Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intex Mariner 4 modifications and Tips

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "The leak did cause me to regret the original use of OSB for my flooring material...never dried out, absorbed a bunch of water and nearly doubled in thickness..thus increasing the weight considerably..So I have been there done that badge of honor also!!!LOL"

    Yes I believe it is a very unique pain we share, one that few others can ever comprehend.

    As regards the maintenance hell that is repairs using solvents.

    I grew tired of using PVC solvents that claimed to end my misery of puddles at my ankles. Some would last one or two trips but I always ended up where I started, wet and miserable. In fact if I were out for twelve hours on a long summer day I'd have to set aside an hour half to empty the boat of gear and tip the boat to get all the water out. So I decided to experiment.

    I took one of the inflatable pillows that came with the boat which use the same material as the hull, and dissected it into a variety of patches I might need in the future. Then using a batch of small patches I smeared each in different types of solvent, folded them over, let them dry then left them in glasses of water to gauge their effectiveness. I lost count of how many different types of solvent I bought from my local hardware store, some of them costing £10 ($14) for a small tube.

    What eventually worked perfectly was the one glue I had been avoiding for fear of destroying the boat. Superglue.

    I've been out a dozen times on my superglue patch and it's still solid, but here's the catch. Are all superglues identical? I'm not so sure. Having found a brand that works I would never try another on the boat without first testing it on a patch. Having established a superglue that worked I bought a bunch of that specific brand for future events. (In this case it's cheap generic superglue from my local Asda superstore.) If it works, hoard it, is my motto.

    But on the subject of the floor. In my opinion the floor membrane and the seam attaching it to the boat hull are the Mariner's greatest weakness. In particular the rear half of the floor where most of the weight is usually sitting. I've highlighted this pic so people know what I'm talking about.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	INTEX MARINER FLOOR 01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	55.8 KB
ID:	8855209





    I fish with my Mariner in the glacial lochs of Scotland, which usually means stones, millions of them. From the start I would use a tarp for setting up the boat before dragging it into the water proper.

    But I soon realised the weight at the rear when coming back ashore was creating tiny pin prick holes in the membrane. And while they won't bring too much water in, it does highlight the weakness of the material. So much so I considered buying a roll of grey PVC and covering the membrane at the rear half, either side of the keel's rock-guard strip.

    However I had doubts about whether or not I could glue such large sections of PVC securely without them coming off when the boat was going through the water. In the end I came up with better methods for getting the boat in and out the water to avoid stones causing problems. I repaired the holes I had using transparent bike repair patches placed on the inside of the membrane and they work fine.

    I saw someone asking earlier what was the best method for finding holes. In my experience, if it's an air hole, coat one section of the boat at a time in very soapy water and it should reveal the leak. It helps if you have someone occasionally pumping air into the section to maintain pressure until leak is found.

    If it's a water leak relating to the floor membrane or floor seam, try this.

    Fully inflate the boat in darkness either inside the house or in the yard. Flip the boat and climb underneath. Have someone on the outside use a very powerful torch to highlight the membrane and seal while you push the membrane up and away from you. Work your way slowly section by section to give each section the all clear.

    If there are any holes in the membrane they will light up and look like stars in the night sky. Use a marker pen to circle them for patching later using transparent bike tube patches.

    If there are any weaknesses in the seal, they will show up as brighter sections where it's been stressed. Mark those areas on the outside, taking care to outline the length of the problem. Do this even if you see no actual holes. If the section is brighter it's stressed and will likely open once full weight is applied to hull when boat is in use. Then apply a patch at least two inches wide and as long as the highlighted area. I even considered doing this the entire length of the seam to prevent future problems.

    Best way to apply a patch? You'll need your solvent of choice, a patch, a heavy weight and a Beanie Baby. Yeah, I finally found a use for Beanie Babies. Apply solvent to patch and area to be patched. Once tacky press patch on, ensuring there are no air bubbles etc. Wipe away excess solvent from the edges then lay Beanie baby on patch. Then put heavy weight on the Beanie. The Beanie's tiny beaded innards will spread the weight out evenly over the patch to ensure a good seal. Leave for at least a couple of hours, or twenty mins if using a superglue you know to be safe.

    Over time sand and grit will build up along the seams and under the inflatable keel, so giving your boat a good hosing or pressure wash around the inside seams now and again is a good idea.

    :-)

    Comment


    • Scottish
      Good Post.....distant minds motivated by wet feet and gear seem to think alike. With the trend towards modifying the floors etc(obviously a seller ,as Intex began last year putting slatted floors in their M-3's at nearly double the cost) one would think that they might be open to the suggestion of reinforcing the dreaded floor /side tube seam with higher and better stitching, glue whatever....but as many will attest to in this post,talking to Intex customer service is like yelling at power bait.
      BTW..in in our backwards section of the world(pacific coast America) the word "torch" would be something powered by Propane with a high pressure flame used to cut metal. However, considering the frustration I have felt looking for water leaks, or air pin holes at night ,which I have done, you may have fully intended to use that word, as a final, but satisfying recourse to the inept engineering foisted upon us by some third tier lackey at INTEX, and the resultant encroaching into our personal space ,by water in a supposedly dry and safe inflatable oasis.
      They obviouly don't realize "IT'S NOT JUST A RAFT" to us, more like a user friendly version of the Queen Mary, and should be engineered thus!
      Last edited by flukesofnature; October 23rd, 2014, 09:09 AM.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by flukesofnature View Post
        Scottish
        Good Post.....distant minds motivated by wet feet and gear seem to think alike. With the trend towards modifying the floors etc(obviously a seller ,as Intex began last year putting slatted floors in their M-3's at nearly double the cost) one would think that they might be open to the suggestion of reinforcing the dreaded floor /side tube seam with higher and better stitching, glue whatever....but as many will attest to in this post,talking to Intex customer service is like yelling at power bait.
        BTW..in in our backwards section of the world(pacific coast America) the word "torch" would be something powered by Propane with a high pressure flame used to cut metal. However, considering the frustration I have felt looking for water leaks, or air pin holes at night ,which I have done, you may have fully intended to use that word, as a final, but satisfying recourse to the inept engineering foisted upon us by some third tier lackey at INTEX, and the resultant encroaching into our personal space ,by water in a supposedly dry and safe inflatable oasis.
        They obviouly don't realize "IT'S NOT JUST A RAFT" to us, more like a user friendly version of the Queen Mary, and should be engineered thus!

        I hear you. The real reason to share such horror stories is to spare those starting out with their Mariner's the grief of battling the appearance of interior ankle puddles. There's nothing like experience, and nothing gifts experience like a bad experience.

        Comment


        • Hello everyone. This forum has some really great info so thanks for everyone contributing, read the whole thing. I bought my girl a M4 at the end of September. I live in Jersey so the weather is starting to get cold. Don't have a lot of money so will do these upgrades slowly and in stages. Actually not a bad thing that winter is coming, since can get this thing prepared. I don't expect us to take the boat out very often, a few times a year, but that's why the cost was a big factor.
          I plan on making the wood floor first. It seems like 1/2 inch thickness is a good size. I plan on making a 3 piece as a 2 piece will not really fit in trunk of my car. So roughly 3 pcs, 3 foot by 3 foot, using regular plywood, not OSB after reading Flukes tips/experience. I was also looking at getting some rubber H-channels to connect the pieces but not sure if that's necessary. The aluminum ones looked nice in the earlier posts but metal edges would make me nervous. I have wondered though, since weight is always a concern with a portable boat, can you put holes or slits in the wood to lighten it? I know it was said the floor membrane molds to the floor from the water pressure but wonder if you just use the original floor underneath the wood without the inserts that might work or carpet over all the holes? Anyway thinking out loud there, weight might not even be reduced after that.
          The next thing I would like to do after the floor is complete is to install some chairs. Seems like bolts with wing nuts work out well and help with the portability of them. Do you think putting a seat pedestal in the 3'x3' plywood would be OK since the keel chamber hole would be very close to where it would be mounted? IT would be nice to fit a cooler in the middle of the boat along with the 2 mounted seats. Do you think that's possible? Will likely use coolers for seats at first which is why floor is priority.
          Another thing after reading about tiny holes in the floor membrane, can you put glue and fabric from the inflatable seats on the seams before anything happens as sort of a prevention? I guess I'm buying HH66 as recommended on here but not sure how that really works.
          I also tried inflating the boat to check if it works ok and it was fine but I had a really hard time inflating the keel. The valve on the keel is a pain to try and pinch after the floor is in and keep the pump in. Any tips? Easier to inflate in the water? Couldn't imagine trying to do that alone.
          The engine would be the last thing but don't want to get too far ahead of myself.
          Sorry for so many questions.

          Comment


          • I plan on making the wood floor first. It seems like 1/2 inch thickness is a good size. I plan on making a 3 piece as a 2 piece will not really fit in trunk of my car.
            Avoid anything but 2 piece if you can. I slide mine behind the front two seats standing on their sides and they fit fine.

            So roughly 3 pcs, 3 foot by 3 foot, using regular plywood, not OSB after reading Flukes tips/experience. I was also looking at getting some rubber H-channels to connect the pieces but not sure if that's necessary. The aluminum ones looked nice in the earlier posts but metal edges would make me nervous.
            Two pieces sit just fine once boat is inflated, no idea how 3 would sit, but if you're fitting chairs you simply must go with 2 pieces, read my earlier post on hinged floor sections to learn why.

            I have wondered though, since weight is always a concern with a portable boat, can you put holes or slits in the wood to lighten it? I know it was said the floor membrane molds to the floor from the water pressure but wonder if you just use the original floor underneath the wood without the inserts that might work or carpet over all the holes?
            I always insert original floor with a single slat to level out the two pieces of ply where they meet in the middle. If you're going to make holes to save weight, make them circular and relatively small to maintain floor strength and keep them away from where you intend to fit chair stem. As regards carpeting, I started with carpet then ripped it out. All it does is add weight when it's damp, but then I live in Scotland.

            The next thing I would like to do after the floor is complete is to install some chairs. Seems like bolts with wing nuts work out well and help with the portability of them. Do you think putting a seat pedestal in the 3'x3' plywood would be OK since the keel chamber hole would be very close to where it would be mounted?

            If you make keel valve hole as big as I did you will have no problem accessing the valve. However I do advise cutting a bigger hole in the original slat floor as it can be a pain lining it up sometimes. As I said, I do not advise installing chairs on such small sections of ply. You need at least two sections to properly spread out the weight, otherwise you'll tear the seams from pressure points when you're sitting down.

            IT would be nice to fit a cooler in the middle of the boat along with the 2 mounted seats. Do you think that's possible? Will likely use coolers for seats at first which is why floor is priority.
            You don't have to "fit" the cooler, just sit it on the floor. Or better still build a bow board to get it out of the boat entirely.

            Another thing after reading about tiny holes in the floor membrane, can you put glue and fabric from the inflatable seats on the seams before anything happens as sort of a prevention?
            You could, but it could be a lot of work you never have to do if you avoid some of the pitfalls mentioned by others.

            The valve on the keel is a pain to try and pinch after the floor is in and keep the pump in. Any tips?
            Make hole to access keel valve through ply floor 14x10 and it should no longer pinch when using pump.

            Easier to inflate in the water? Couldn't imagine trying to do that alone.
            I only inflate keel once on the water. Hope this helps.

            Comment


            • Anyone ever heard of/try this patch? The Type B patch works on PVC material I'm told by the company. Watch the video under Video - Application Hints...Link below

              I picked up 10' of 10 AWG wire today to extend the reach of my Minkota trolling motor wires. I'm going to move the battery up to the middle of the boat. I weigh 210 lbs, the battery is close to 70 lbs which means presently I have close to 300 lbs on the stern portion of the floor. After reading the above posts on floor seam issues I'm worried I might blow it out in the rear.
              Last edited by Starkonian; October 23rd, 2014, 06:55 PM.

              Comment


              • starkonian
                I have tried the tear aid and it seemed to work OK. I confess I went back later and put a patch with adhesive on the spot. I think in an emergency the tear aid would be a good first response to the leak. It comes with pretty good reviews. I will say this..find some way to keep it 100 percent dry if you use it as an emergency repair kit item. Carry some alcohol swabs with it( any drug sore or grocery store has them) I never got the type A and B down, B being the underwater? patch..which I don't give a lot of credence to. I blew a hole like that and lost all air once on the keel while rafting a river and hit a rapid sidewise and there was this large stick....but it went PFFFFFFFSSSST..oddly the two side tubes got me to the end of the day..and I patched it all at home I now pull out of the river/lake, dry off the area as best as possible and then wipe down with alcohol pad( twice )from the tear outward in small circles to cover at least an inch on each direction away from the hole, apply adhesive( I carry a small tube of LOC-tite pvc/vinyl cement..7.95 at home depot)let it dry for about 10-15 minutes, apply another coat of the adhesive to the same spot, and to the patch,let both dry 10 more minutes..then press the patch on the hole, use something..the blunt end of a fishing knife, a spoon whatever, and press the bubbles out from the center out ward..re- inflate and be on my way..only a small 30 minute excursion at worst, But here's the rub..At the end of that day, I would go home -reclean the area with acetone,extending out another inch to inch and a half from the edge of the first patch, and then repeat the patch process, this time with the hh66, and let that sit..uninflated( put a weight of some kind on it) and let the whole thing sit for at least 24 hours, reinflate,test the patch spot with soapy water and then I trust it is a done deal...maybe over kill..and maybe the tear aid would hold permanently.....Just sayin

                Bibby
                I have too agree with scottish on the two piece set up...I haven't read too much enthusiasm on the three piece set up...movement,unequal pressures at the joining edges, and a loss of the original intent, which would be stability when standing or moving in the boat.
                I did use carpet, and it did get wet, and stay wet with the wet OSB, but it also has a heat breaking effect( all day long in glaring sun reflecting off of bare wood or worse...wood with shiny polyurethane coating....makes for a really hot floor and boating day.) Scottish hasn't seen the sun for 150 years(LOL) in that lattitude so heat and glare may be foreign concepts to him(LOL) eventually the rug has to be cleaned up..fish blood, power bait, dried ham sandwiches,etc, and it does add extra weight....your call.
                The 3X3 section attached to the swivel chair.....think of leaning back real hard , while setting a hook on a fish, or if the boat hit a swell,etc....is that 3x3 section gonna stay down , secure , under the side tubes, when you put that kind of sudden pressure on it backwards.....?????

                The HH66 is multi purpose...it can be used as above mentioned regular patching with PVC patch, OR( drum roll...) it can be applied directly to a hole where air is leaking out or water is leaking in( after drying, cleaning..as above) as an "adhesive membrane" of sorts, which does provide leak stoppage(sp?)It, in this application should be repeated several coatings( at least three)..with appropriate dry time between coats a necessity, and extending each coat a little farther away from the "centerpoint"where the hole is located. I use it because it probably has the best cost/amount value, and at one time I used about a quart of it to coat an area of blown side tube/floor seam leakage.

                In reference to the difficulty in inflating the keel...I usually inflate my m-3 about 1/2 full in all chambers.with a 12 V coleman pump, from the cigarette lighter...then I carry it like a folded sandwich to the water( have gone 100 yards in this fashion) at waters edge I insert the floor pieces, swivel chair mod , and everything else...motor mount, trolling motor( you will find the motor mount is much easier to attach when the tubes are about 1/2 full) then I hand pump up the two side tubes and the floor, with the boat about 7/8 in the water( Again scottish nailed it when he describes the value of a larger keel hole). Then I shove off.The change from warm air( pump) to cool water usually causes a need to top off everything( the mariner 3 has three chambers)about 15 minutes in the water with the hand pump>NOTE always take the hand pump with you..Always....

                **added note. Some never experienced a pressure drop after entering the water. They may have followed the Intex manual to the tee , by only hand inflating the M3/M4( yes there is paragraph warning not to use inflators battery or otherwise)...and the physics seems to make sense..compressed air is warmer, then cools..thus the pressure drop.I am used to a couple of top offs a day...but the first time I did that , undid the boston valve top to be able to use the hand pump, I thought I would for sure fly around in the air backwards for thirty seconds and be in the center of the lake draped in PVC watching my trolling motor submerged and dragging me farther into the abyss.....but it all turned out just fine.** I even notice a pressure drop when the wind changes, and just before dusk. WHO-KNEW???????

                .The boston valves will allow you to inflate without any subsequent air loss..a nice , handy feature..the keel valve is supposed to allow that also, but even if it leaked a little while you inserted the hand pump, you could make up the difference..don't tempt fate though ..the keel valve is the easiest to unknowingly dislodge, and with a little pressure....PFFFFFFT..just sayin Also, the keel valve cover is the easiest to rip from the base of the valve, and then easy to lose during tear down,when putting the boat away....HMMMM how do I know this????? Pre think what to do and how to re-attach this cover/plug now while you are in the safety of your warm home (LOL)

                The keel is easier to do in the water, yes, but if you don't like that method, turning it on one side will take the pressure of the ground pushing the keel upwards while inflating, and on its side you can pretty much inflate the whole keel no problem. Again..you will find out what works for you after a few set ups..no hard and fast rules...

                Deflating the keel is easier, without having to squeeze it the whole time, by getting a 10 inch length of 8 or 10 guage wire(definitely rubber coated) duck tape the ends, fold it in half, and twist the bottom of the fold on itself about 5 or six turns. then fold down the two duck taped ends( it will resemble a "T") insert the twisted, bottom of the "T" into the keel valve, where it opens the flapper valve. The two ends of the wire( the top of the "T") prevent the wire from falling or being pushed accidentally too far into the valve(ask me how I know this!!!!) The air will rush out on it's own, you can do other things while it deflates. and it will stay in the hole , even while you are doing your final fold up( this helps get all the air out of the keel. Then remove the wire, and replace the valve cover( prevents air from working its way back into the keel..so that you (OF COURSE YOU CAN).....chuckle chuckle....) get the M4 back into its little bag, all folded nice and tight.
                When you are done with the frustration of the fold into the Intex Bag game....get a 8x10 tarp. Fold the M4/M3 as tight as you can without having a stroke, place that folded bundle on the tarp that is folded in half lengthwise. Making it 4x10. Place the m4 bundle about 2/3 down the tarp. take that section ( the 2/3 length) of tarp and fold it to the edge of the M4.fold the short section of the tarp(The 1/3 section)to where is meets the edge of the folded 2/3 section( usually about the center of the M4 bundle. where these two edges of the tarp meet can be easily grabbed , and used like a sling to carry the M4,all bundled up to your car( without the slat floor in it..pack that in a separate area/smaller bag..or even in the "O-SO" useless Intex bag) and then place in your trunk area or back seat or fold down space. This tarp will protect the M4 and it can easily be carried to place of storage or next destination, like a sling,in most cases by one person. The slatted floor is what makes it too bulky and heavy to handle by one person.
                If that doesn't work for you , just use the folded tarp to drag the bundled M4 to where ever you need to pack it into your car/truck....still easier that trying to handle the bundle by carrying like a big sand bag.....
                Last edited by flukesofnature; October 26th, 2014, 12:59 PM.

                Comment


                • Rule 6 - . You may not post in the forum to promote any personal enterprise, advertise a business or product, or to solicit responses for contests, polls, or similar. This includes directing members to social networking sites.
                  Last edited by GA_Boater; October 25th, 2014, 08:02 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Sorry Sadarahu, I would, except I refuse to have anything to do with Facebook.

                    Comment


                    • Sadarahu..A lot of us have had bad bad experiences with Facebook foolishness...........I concur with ScottishScript

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by ScottishScript View Post
                        "Scottishscript~ so what did you end up doing with the floor situation. Greg_S said he uses two unconnected boards and did not report any stress issues with the boat. Was it the hinge which caused the boat to stress and rip? I was thinking of doing as Greg_S advised but don't want to trash the boat."

                        When I used two unconnected sections from day one I had zero problems. Here's a pic of one I made the other day and these work perfect.

                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]n8852165[/ATTACH]

                        It was only once I tried to turn the two separate sections into two sections that folded on hinges that I ran into trouble. The hinges made for easier transportation because I could fold them down, but the boards would never sit flat again when in the boat. This meant the weight of me, my seat and battery where transferred to two acute areas where the hinged sections joined. See photo below.
                        Hey Scottish thanks for the detailed report, I was wondering if you could post a pic of the otherside of the hinged floor if you still have it (would like to see the type of hinge and spacing you used). I was wondering if a piano hinge with ~half inch gap between the boards (to allow swelling) would keep it folding nicely. I feel like the unconnected boards could end up "pinching" a section of boat and wearing it down over time. (but i havent even taken the boat on the water yet so I have no basis for that assumption)
                        You made me realize i cannot store everything under the back seat so im going to make up a centre console to store the battery and mount a fish finder as many others have done. I may try to mount some proper rod holder on it as well. Kudos on trolling 4 rods off this boat!! Ill start with 2 for now, I expect to be fishing solo most of the time anyhow.
                        Just keeping my eye out for a set of seats and a decent trolling motor over the winter to pick up cheap.
                        Im having a hard time resisting buying it all now so i can get out on the water before the ice comes. Luckily the steelhead are keeping me distracted... for now.

                        Comment


                        • Took the M4 out today for what will most likely be the final trip of the year. I was out in Cherokee Marsh on the Yahara River. The wind pick up a bit, it wasn't strong but it was enough to put some light chop on the water and that was pushing me the opposite direction of the rivers current. It also made it a challenge keeping the boat pointed in the direction I wanted once I anchored up in a spot I wanted to fish so I got to wandering if a drift sock would have been useful in this scenario. Anyone out there use one or have experience with one in an inflatable?

                          Also have the plywood to make my floor now and putting thought into that. A lot of new info. posted on that recently. Something that has been on my mind for that, has anyone considered how doing a flat floor can stress the boats seams? Just as an experiment I set up the M4 in my garage with the stock floor but I only inflated tubes 1-4 and left the keel flat. I then walked around the floor. When I stayed in the 6 foot center portion before the ends start to taper I could tell the slates were solidly against the garage floor, but as soon as I stepped into either end of the M4 where the sides taper in and the ends taper up it was obvious that the floor of the M4 was no longer on the garage floor due to the natural upward turn of the tubes. If I now insert a solid sheet of flat plywood in place of the flexible floor that prevents the boat from taking it's natural shape it seems to me that can cause stress the boat is not designed to have or deal with.

                          Just more for me to consider while I decide how exactly I want to build my floor. I cannot do a 2 piece as seems to be the most popular due to the limited cargo space in my vehicle. I am restricted to maximum of 3 foot lengths so a little extra engineering my be required on my part...
                          Last edited by Brusac; October 27th, 2014, 05:32 PM.

                          Comment


                          • I use a small drift sock on my M4 bass fishing, it is an absolute MUST HAVE. It changes everything.

                            I have the "drift control" brand i bought off Amazon. Its very robust.

                            I bought the smallest one, and im confident it is the correct one, i have total control once it deploys and corrects itself/ balloons up with water..

                            The one i have is fabric reinforced blue vinyl, it has a heavy nylon eye loop at the end of the cone, i tie my fish basket here, it is absolutely the very best way i have found to manage and keep fish, days of grab *** with aerators are in the rear view mirror. (The weight of the basket at stopped cont... Well im not going to write a novel, just try itonce you get your sock.. Its awesome..)

                            (Now understand, i pull my boat while fishing, drift sock at opposite end being drug behind..)

                            Honest to goodness, as far as fishing solo, i can thing of no other vessel i would choose to fish from for a number of reasons..

                            Heres the bass i caught Sunday, from a Pelican not my M4,.. With a buddy.. My gosh was that thing squirrley!
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • Same bass with my buddy holding her..
                              Attached Files

                              Comment


                              • Sign up today
                                Brusac
                                I can say from my experience....seams and seam/ floor junction are definitely stressed with wood floor. Without a doubt ...that is where the water leaks started to appear. Centering as much weight as possible( making mod so that , if you are solo most of the time, you can have your seat close enough to the middle to act as a centering balance) and then if you have a friend, mod your boat so that this function can be used to spread the weight fore and aft.
                                Maybe two set of holes where the seat can be moved, and then re- bolted down in second position.
                                I have re-sealed a lot of seam area in the last year....frustration.
                                But the trade off is having the floor, and the resultant stability, as opposed to no floor..or the original slatted floor????
                                I also think that the smaller size of the M3 just increases the pressure in the seams with me and the floor in place, whereas maybe the extra square footage of surface area in the M4 is enough to spread it out and and reduces the pressure just enough at the floor/side tube junction. I also am wondering if some of the original posts....may have been correct to add a PVC pipe frame( 1/2 inch or 1 inch diameter)under the floor may in fact remove the downward stress of the wood against the floor seams. I think if you raised it up( the height of the pvc pipe..say 1/2 inch) you might lose the advantage of having the wood floor "tuck" under the inflated side tubes, and all the stability that that affords. Just sayin
                                Last edited by flukesofnature; October 27th, 2014, 10:44 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X