1973 Starcraft SuperSport 16ft. restoration questions

MNhunter1

Lieutenant Junior Grade
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May 12, 2014
Messages
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Seriously, new holes sounds like the best way to get the new marine plywood attached. Here is the plan: drill a new hole for the rivet, brush the 3M5200 onto the rivet shank and bottom, push the rivet into the hole (some of the 5200 will fill the void between the new rivet and wood), attach pop rivet tool and “fire away!”. Wipe off all excess 5200 from top of flooring. Repeat as required.

Safe boating,
Joe
Yes, drill a hole or two and install the rivet. Only way to ensure everything stays aligned and doesn't shift if you go through and drill them all. I always start with the stringers and do the rib ends last. Put some tape or a stop collar around the bit so you don't drill them too far and hit the actual hull. Pre-mark the center location of your rib ends on the hull side with a sharpie(if going to get covered) or some painters tape so you know where they are after the decking is placed. I also mark the stringer locations with a sharpie line for ease of installation.

I typically use a popsicle stick to spread on the 3M5200, and countersink my rivets in the locations where they will be walked on or may leave a small bubble under the Nautolex, then fill over with 5200 or MarineTex. Depending on what your plan is for the deck covering and installation method (covered rivets or exposed), you'll need to determine what is best for you.
Deck2.jpg
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
We are definitely on the same page, my friend, including the rib position marking, drill bit stop and countersink on the flooring tops. I really appreciate the photo you posted, too.

One of the thoughts crossing my mind goes hand in hand with your photo: should I be cutting an access opening in the plywood? I don’t plan on storing anything under the flooring, as I would rather have as much floatation foam under the flooring as would be practical.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

MNhunter1

Lieutenant Junior Grade
Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
1,025
One of the thoughts crossing my mind goes hand in hand with your photo: should I be cutting an access opening in the plywood? I don’t plan on storing anything under the flooring, as I would rather have as much floatation foam under the flooring as would be practical.

Safe boating,
Joe
Mine is a center console, so the holes in the center are for the steering, controls, wires/cables, and livewell plumbing to run under the deck and back to the transom. This model has an aluminum tray that rivets to the stringer to hold all the cables. The livewell plumbing just rests on the bottom of the hull, and runs below my floatation foam

You will typically find the cutout at the transom for most of the OB Starcrafts. All three of mine had it, but generally only cut out on one side of the knee brace where the drain plug is. I always found it useful for placing/checking the bilge pump/float switch and visual inspection to see if any water is in the hull. My current MR180 has it cut out on both sides, which allows for access to the bilge pump, float switch, livewell pump/hose fittings, and the port side has an aluminum shelf that secures to the transom and rests in the void to hold the battery.

I've attached a photo(not mine) that shows the aluminum storage tray, plumbing, and the battery tray of a similar center console Starcraft. Obviously looks much better once things are renovated and the deck is in place, but still allows quick access to everything in the event it is needed. I have also attached another example where the area was completely enclosed(center console configuration again), with an access hatch added. Much less to worry about with the console configuration of the SS models and the ability to run everything under the gunnels and/or behind the side panels, but somewhat necessary for the center console set-ups.
photo322806.jpgkicker1.jpeg
 

piperjoe

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Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
Once again I thank you for the explanation and photos. The explanation is greatly appreciated and goes a long way towards helping to keep us on the restoration path.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
More floatation foam pieces into the boat today. Getting into the front ribs now and they present a bit more complexity as far as the pattern work but I will get it worked out and the new foam installed.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

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piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
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More floatation foam pieces into the boat today. Really enjoyed the sunshine and Fall like weather while working on the boat with the Admiral. We feel like progress is being made and that’s a good thing. 🙂

Safe boating,
Joe
 

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piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
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By this time you all are probably aware that when I stop to ponder something 🤔, it likely results in a question. I was looking at the transom area inside the hull and am wondering if I should consider installing a single, large, fuel cell with an external gas filler tube and gas gauge, or should I use multiple 5 gallon gas containers (which should not be filled to capacity due to gas expansion) that would hold 4 gallons or so each? Separate 5 gallon containers would require more “fill and use” action, and I would probably need at least three of the containers on board (12 - 13 gallons on board) for use with the big 85hp Johnson outboard bolted to the boat. Our lakes around here are generally large and I really do not have the experience/knowledge of changing over gasoline containers while on the water, i.e. , how do I know when to change tanks so as not to run out of gas on the container in use? So…I welcome your thoughts and comments on the subject. 🙂

Safe boating,
Joe
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
No boat work today…yet….was yard work time instead. And I think I will ask the Admiral if she would like to go out for dinner. She has been a big help with the boat work and today’s yard work! I think a show of appreciation is important as we continue on with this boat restoration journey. 🙂 Tomorrow I can do some additional foam installation if it doesn’t rain. And perhaps get those screws into the transom wood, on the inside of the hull, that I noticed I have not got to yet. That’ll make for one less zip bag to attend to.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

piperjoe

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Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
More floatation foam work this afternoon for a few hours until the rain clouds came into our neck of the woods. Have to make continual adjustments to the foam patterns to accommodate the bow area hull and rib curvature, however, that’s kind of fun in its own way. And onward we go! 😁

Safe boating,
Joe
 

MNhunter1

Lieutenant Junior Grade
Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
1,025
I've alw
By this time you all are probably aware that when I stop to ponder something 🤔, it likely results in a question. I was looking at the transom area inside the hull and am wondering if I should consider installing a single, large, fuel cell with an external gas filler tube and gas gauge, or should I use multiple 5 gallon gas containers (which should not be filled to capacity due to gas expansion) that would hold 4 gallons or so each? Separate 5 gallon containers would require more “fill and use” action, and I would probably need at least three of the containers on board (12 - 13 gallons on board) for use with the big 85hp Johnson outboard bolted to the boat. Our lakes around here are generally large and I really do not have the experience/knowledge of changing over gasoline containers while on the water, i.e. , how do I know when to change tanks so as not to run out of gas on the container in use? So…I welcome your thoughts and comments on the subject. 🙂

Safe boating,
Joe
I've always ran portable tanks with any outboard running mixed gas. I just like having the ability to access everything, empty tanks, swap tanks, remove tanks to fill at a local gas station without having to tow the boat there or pay the premium prices at the marinas. A 6 gallon tank or two tends to work fine for a day on the water with these smaller boats. I'm doing a 12 gallon on my 18ft with a gas thirsty 115hp. I'd prefer to go bigger, but the 12 gallon just works best with the space and my intended use. I also plan to incorporate a storage space for an extra tank for those days I feel I may need a little extra fuel.
On multi-day vacation trips, with my old 16ss running a 45hp, I just brought two 6 gallon portables and would swap them out and fill as needed.
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
Thanks for your valued comments regarding my fuel tank post. Here’s my questions: a 12 gallon tank sounds good, however, I wonder if I can lift that full tank of gas into the boat each time it needs refilled as the small stroke I had made my left arm weaker (and I am left handed). Also, with the individual fuel tanks, do you just keep an eye on the fuel level for a given tank and then stop the boat to change over to another tank as needed? Is there a way to gang the tanks so the fuel is drawn from the extra tanks to one tank and then to the motor? Embarrassing for me have to ask but that’s the lot of a snuffy’s life! 🤣

Safe boating,
Joe
 

MNhunter1

Lieutenant Junior Grade
Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
1,025
Thanks for your valued comments regarding my fuel tank post. Here’s my questions: a 12 gallon tank sounds good, however, I wonder if I can lift that full tank of gas into the boat each time it needs refilled as the small stroke I had made my left arm weaker (and I am left handed). Also, with the individual fuel tanks, do you just keep an eye on the fuel level for a given tank and then stop the boat to change over to another tank as needed? Is there a way to gang the tanks so the fuel is drawn from the extra tanks to one tank and then to the motor? Embarrassing for me have to ask but that’s the lot of a snuffy’s life! 🤣

Safe boating,
Joe
Yes, you can gang two tanks together, or just swap the fuel line from one tank to the other when the one gets low/empty. Several tanks have fuel gauges, but with the ebb/flow of these boats and the smaller tanks, I always just found it best to judge by the feel of the tank. If it is easily accessible, a quick little grab will give pretty good feedback on how much is still sloshing around in there. My spare tank was a fill tank with the gas/oil already mixed, so I typically just top off the main tank each morning and never had to worry about it for the rest of the day. Really boils down on how you intend to use the boat and the daily fuel consumption for that intended use. I also don't like old gas sitting in my tanks, so the smaller tanks and portability give me more options for fuel management between outings as well.
 

piperjoe

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Messages
556
I can understand how the method you use can be a good way to go. Actually, I am finishing the boat with my wife as she has early dementia and some days are rougher than the day before. We have many beautiful lakes within our neck of the woods and the Admiral agrees with me that some boat rides around the area would be nice along with some fishing. Can’t see that I will be making rooster tails often. Just thinking that a gas pull from a single tank, along with a gas gauge mounted with the running gauges would be nice.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
More floatation foam pieces went into the boat this afternoon. Primarily I put what I could into a given area and kept checking that the bottom of the new flooring would rest upon the flooring rails and the rib end.
Getting there…

Safe boating,
Joe
 

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piperjoe

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Forgot to mention that I discovered we have “someone new” on board to keep us going forward….Mr. Tiki will be making sure the Admiral keeps an eye on me while I keep my eyes on the boat. Found him lurking about as I trimmed a foam piece for the boat. He was cut out just like you see the piece, which caused me to chuckle when I saw the “scrap piece” laying on the table. Who says we aren’t having fun here? 😁

Safe boating,
Joe
 

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piperjoe

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Two young ‘uns showed up this morning and want to crew on our boat. They already picked out their quarters in the tube framework piece so they can stand lookout duty on the tire. Those two have been around us all summer and often come within a foot or so of us without being afraid. First time I have seen them on the boat and going in and out of the tube though so I guess I’ll have to address the situation.

Safe boating,
Joe
 

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By this time you all are probably aware that when I stop to ponder something 🤔, it likely results in a question. I was looking at the transom area inside the hull and am wondering if I should consider installing a single, large, fuel cell with an external gas filler tube and gas gauge, or should I use multiple 5 gallon gas containers (which should not be filled to capacity due to gas expansion) that would hold 4 gallons or so each? Separate 5 gallon containers would require more “fill and use” action, and I would probably need at least three of the containers on board (12 - 13 gallons on board) for use with the big 85hp Johnson outboard bolted to the boat. Our lakes around here are generally large and I really do not have the experience/knowledge of changing over gasoline containers while on the water, i.e. , how do I know when to change tanks so as not to run out of gas on the container in use? So…I welcome your thoughts and comments on the subject. 🙂

Safe boating,
Joe
Well Joe, if I may share my thoughts on your fuel tank choice. Stick with the factory (or similar) 6 gal tanks and don't worry about expansion--with 6 gal of gas plus oil, the manufacturer has designed that in. Its a bit inconvenient, and plan ahead so you don't run dry in front of a sea going ship, but do eventually run each tank DRY!!! That way you are assured of the proper and THOROUGH gas/oil mix ratio. That is imperative. Stay away from the built in tanks. They are great, just not so much for 2 cycle outboards. It seems the correct oil/gas ratio and the thorough mixing just don't seem happen. Everything it seems from plugged up fuel/water separators (sucked up straight oil) to total engine destruction (straight gas). I doubt if you and Joyce will be hotdoggin all the time at wide open throttle (that 85 Johnson will be thirsty like that), but at planing speeds, 2/3 (?) throttle it'll be thriftier. 2 or 3 6 gal portables should do just fine. And at the end of the season you won't a bunch of gas going stale, just a gallon or 2. Anyway, just my 2 cents worth. Pete
 

Wildey

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Messages
202
I'd like to add 2 things.
1, the plastic 6 gal. tanks I use have a small "hump" partition that is there to give you a little reserve. If the motor dies from no fuel, tip the tank towards the pickup and you've got just enough to get you out of trouble ...... hopefully.
2, them little critters "walk the plank" if caught around my boats, or other vehicles !
Enjoying your trek, keep up the good work !
I didn't read the entirety, but am wondering if anyone suggested pour foam instead of the sheet stuff.
Thanks !
 

piperjoe

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
556
Thanks Pete and Wildey for the additional comments regarding the fuel tank as it’s all useful information for me. As for them critters…I have prepared a nice last meal for them in a 5 gallon plastic bucket; they just have to come and get it.

Safe boating,
Joe
 
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