Painting tube trailer frame

Lowlysubaruguy

Chief Petty Officer
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Messages
500
I’m replacing pretty much most of my brother in laws drift boat trailer. Anyone have a better idea than I have to get paint down the tubes after its built. This trailer rotted out from the inside.

After its assembled i will drill some holes so water drains make them large enough for this middle of each length of tube.

I was thinking I’d thin out some rustoleum put it in one of those garden wand sprayers and try and fog the tubes as well as possible and maybe roll the trailer round and round a couple times its small and light. Longest tube will be about 6 feet.

But thats just my idea For the moment. Any ideas that might be more effective.
 

matt167

Commander
Joined
Sep 27, 2012
Messages
2,539
There are fogging attachments to do this. as well as products..

I am not affiliated with Eastwood, but a quick google search shows their product
 

robert graham

Admiral
Joined
Apr 16, 2009
Messages
6,761
I use spray white lithium grease on trailer springs, shackles, outboard trim motor pump and motor, etc., etc…..it sets up wherever it’s sprayed in a thin layer, never seems to wash off and does a great job of protecting parts from water/ corrosion…..if you can get the spray grease inside the tubes it will give great protection….
 

JASinIL2006

Rear Admiral
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
4,734
Another option would be to looking into FluidFilm or WoolWax and their application gear. They have applicator wands built to get into frame tubing. Works great on truck undercarriages, I think it would work fine for a trailer frame. The stuff does need to be reapplied from time to time, but I think it would work better than paint. They are lanolin-based, so you won't be putting petroluem-based stuff in the water.
 

JimS123

Admiral
Joined
Jul 27, 2007
Messages
6,624
Rustoleum is a fine topcoat, but it really isn't the ultimate for rust protection.

Prime with "Rust Reformer", second coat of Rustoleum fish oil primer and topcoat with Rustoleum in the color of your choice.
 

bruceb58

Supreme Mariner
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
29,531
Lesson number one. Never build a trailer with enclosed tubes.

For some reason, trailers on expensive boats insist on using these types. My new to me Cobalt is one of them. I would never buy a trailer on purpose that had this and if I was rebuilding a trailer, I sure wouldn't use it.
 

jhande

Petty Officer 1st Class
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
277
Let's take a look at how rust forms; basically metal needs both water/moisture and air/oxygen to form rust.

If the tubes are totally sealed the insides shouldn't rust in theory.
Adding drain holes would allow both water and air to come in contact with the insides of the tubes. Just what metal needs to start rusting.

Using one of those rust converting products won't be as effective as a primer sealer since there's no rust to form the chemical reaction.

Getting a good bond between the processed metal and paint would be a crap shoot. For paint to bond degreasing and sanding would need to be done. Without doing so the paint would/could fail and start peeling or flaking off the metal.

Personally if I really had no choice but to use tubes, I'd look for galvanized metal.
 
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