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  • Floor replacement.

    So I am taking on a project that I know some of you will think I would be better off getting rid of and buying a newer boat, but i like putting in the work. It makes it that much more enjoyable once it's done. I picked up an 85 bayliner capri 18' at some point someone half *** patched the floor. Over time it worsened. I have been a big car guy over the years. Done body work/painted for 15 years. Never done a floor on a boat though. Anyway I started ripping out the old wood. My question is what is the best way to get the panels out from where the steering wheel is and on the opposite side? Once panels are out dies the upper part just hang there?

  • #2
    Probably a dumb question but what is the purpose of the oval shaped hatch in between seats on the floor? Checking to see if water drains? Storage for something? 85 bayliner caprice 18' bowrider. Thanks.

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    • #3
      Ayuh,..... Welcome Aboard,..... Could be to get at the gas tank, or maybe just to reach the nuts holdin' the seats in,.....

      Open it up, 'n look,.....

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      • #4
        Thanks for the reply. I wish I could. Whomever tried to patch the floor at one point covered it. Carpet was still cut for it but no compartment. It should look like this picture.

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        • #5
          If I remember right some manufactures called them ski lockers if they were big enough for such an item, otherwise just a wet storage area.

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          • #6
            So it's not something that's needed? When I put the floor back in if it's not needed I don't think I will put it back in

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            • #7
              It's a nice place to stow wet things because it drains down to the bilge. eric102 is right, it's typically called a ski locker - stick your waterskis and tow ropes in.

              It's not essential in and of itself, but watch how the stringers are built around it. They can be kind of "structural" for the deck.

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              • #8
                Slayze Moved you over to the restoration forum. You'll get some more interest and answers over here.

                I'd tell ya', I think that you're gonna' have to take the windshield off, and then plan out the rebuild of the helm and passenger console. I think those were kinda' molded into the top cap. BUT ... someone who knows will come by and let you know for sure.

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                • #9
                  Thanks I appreciate the input as well as moving the post.

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                  • #10
                    first, why on earth would anyone buy a 33 year old bayliner..... especially with a rotten floor.

                    the build quality being as low as it is, the boat was rotten 15 years ago. the last thing to rot is the floo

                    to fix, you will need to uncap.

                    not sure if the port and starboard consoles are part of the cap or separate parts. if separate parts, you have a lot more work, including removing the windshield and rebuilding the consoles and front bow area

                    then you need to cut out floor, stingers, transom, etc. all down to bare hull then you need to build back up

                    you will spend between $2-3K alone on just the hull, expect to pay about $1-$2k on the interior, then the remainder of things you found broken.

                    It will take you a minimum of 4 weeks straight if that is all you do, 6 weeks if you have to rebuild all the consoles and seating in the bow..... or if you have a life outside of restoring boat hulls, about a year or more of weekends and evenings.
                    Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                    Past Boats
                    1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                    2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                    1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                    What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

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                    • #11
                      start by reading the links in the DIY sticky at the top of the page. start with link 14, then 15, then 18, then 2, 3, 4a, and 4b
                      Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                      1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                      Past Boats
                      1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                      2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                      1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                      What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

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                      • #12
                        Floor patching indicates soft spots on the floor. The floor is usually one of the last things to get soft. If you can open it up, drill some 1/4" holes into the sides (the stringers). If anything but dry wood comes out, the boat is no longer structurally sound and needs a rebuild. If the wood is dry, fill with 5200 and you are good to go.

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                        • #13
                          Hi, well for the most part post 4 is accurate this is a lengthy and expensive project to do that will exceed the future resale value when you want to upgrade. Sadly Bayliner did create some very nice looking and user friendly boats when you look at them but that is where the quality ended for most. Great gel and fiberglass but everything hidden under it was questionable. If you lived close enough to central florida I would gladly come help asses some of the work needed otherwise lots and LOTS of photos from LOTS of angles showing the damage and a few true level shots from the front to see condition of consoles. If they are still even that is great it will help a bunch but if the port is sagging a bit like most do when the floor begins to go will make it a little harder. Redoing both floor and stringer would properly be done uncapped and with a level hull and use a level at all times. Not having the hull 100% supported like when it was in the mold is also a problem for times you have to get inside to work it will distort some so most work and measurements need to happen from outside. Not impossible but very aggravating work. Let me know what you want to do and I will help any way I can.

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                          • #14
                            Oh yeah the floor and some stringers need redone. I am currently ripping it all out.

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                            • #15
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                              Thanks for the replys. I know some would question why? Well I like to do it that's the why. It just makes it that much more enjoyable to me sitting out there fishing while looking at the boat and saying "I did this". To each his own I guess. Yes I do have a life so it will definitely take some time to do. I know I may run into some costs that will end up being more than what I may get if sold, but if I can get it right I don't plan on selling it. Maybe when I can't use it anymore I will give it to one of the kids who knows.

                              Rot seems to be the worst up front. Further back it seems to get better. I do have fiberglass experience and have all the resins and glass I need to do the job. Just need some marine wood once I'm ready. Port and starboard consoles are part of the cap. I have never done a floor in a boat, but I do have a friend who has and has even more fiberglass experience than I do. Other than the floor and stuff under that can't be seen the upper was in decent shape. Seats do need new wood under, but that's the easy part. RE2new Thank for offering to help me, but I am in Ohio.

                              I also picked up a 71 C10 I will be restoring to haul it with. Already have a nice tri-coat Red that I will be eventually painting the truck with. Maybe I can get them done around the same time 😉.

                              Guy I got the boat from had it out on the lake plenty of times, but I wanted to get it right before taking it out.

                              I will see if I can get a few photos uploaded, but the size limit on uploads is pretty small.

                              Again thanks for any and all the help. I have been watching a ton of videos and reading as much as I can. I'm definitely trying to research as much as I can and will be looking at the post you are recommending. I haven't seen a lot of videos of people removing panels under consoles. Usually they are already out or the are doing it without taking them out.

                              What about the seat boxes? What's the best way to get those out of there? Can I do so with them being reusable? Also once I get stuff out of the way I will be removing all the wet foam. Already have access to 2lb 2 component foam when it comes time to put it back in.

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