how to correctly daisy chain grounds under console for 1979 Ranger boat

RebelAggie

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I had a 85hp Force motor put on the boat about three years ago. Boat shop that did the work replaced all the steering mechanisms under the console also. But during the course of all of this, wires were removed (or just simply cut off) from their connections.
I have replaced all of the toggle switches with new ones, but need help trying to figure out how to properly chain hot and ground wires from lights, to speedo, to fuel gauge switches, as well as from aerator switches to livewell timer.
This is the only diagram I have/can find, but either I'm missing something, or just don't understand the diagram correctly, but I still don't have power to anything on my console.
 

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alldodge

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For grounds on gauges just go from one gauge to another. Its always good practice to install a negative buss when several connections are needed. Most power should come from the battery (+ & -) using 10 awg wire. Here is pic of typical install using Blue sea equipment.

Gen Wiring Diagram.jpg
 

RebelAggie

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Thank you for the information. Would it be better to try and use the existing fuse panel, or just simply rip everything out and start all over with new stuff? This is also the first boat I have ever owned, and I really am not wanting to have to get rid of it.
 

alldodge

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Would it be better to try and use the existing fuse panel,

If the current stuff is in good shape or can be cleaned up, I don't see any reason to change it. This is your call as to the shape it's in
 

rlb81

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Is is truly common practice to run all of the switched accessories from a single circuit as shown on that diagram? I'm not super familiar with boat wiring but that surprises me.
 

RebelAggie

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I really don't know if the fuse block is any good anymore. It may be, but with all of the previous wiring being disconnected from it in one form or the other, I have no clue as to whether I have it all hooked back up right.
 

Grub54891

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I'd assume its an old glass type fuse panel. I'd upgrade to the new style, and at that point you will know the panel is not the problem.
 

Scott Danforth

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I prefer separate grounds vs daisy chaining. Daisy chaining is done because it saves labor and wire, making a bit more profit for the harness manufacturers
 

Grub54891

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Scott is correct, I just repaired one that had constant gauge issues. The daisy chain grounds kept cutting out randomly, I cleaned them up but it still would act up. Once seperated, they worked fine. I was beginning to think it was a bad gauge, till I fixed the grounds.
 

RebelAggie

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Okay, Thank you all for your advice and input. I think I will go ahead and upgrade the fuse panel anyway. I am also thinking of running all components independently from one another as far as the wiring is concerned. It should not be to hard to find the connectors I need to hook everything up separately to the batteries, then run to each component and then to fuse panel.

Thanks again everybody. here is a few pictures of the boat I am working with.
 

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gm280

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In "my opinion and experiences", daisy chain works equally well with any other ground setup. If you use a grounding block, there is zero difference between such a block distribution and proper daisy chain configuration. DOD aircrafts used daisy chain in all their aircraft panels and there is ZERO issues doing that. However, with that stated, the daisy chain wires have to be clean and shiny metal to metal connections. Any corrosion at any one of the jumper chained connections, and that includes tarnished copper as well, makes for a problem circuit(s). But if all the connections are clean, shiny metal and tight, there will be no difference between a ground distribution block configuration and daisy chained connections. You can just as easy have a corroded grounding block connection issue as well. So the key is clean shiny tight connections which ever setup you chose. JMHO!
 

RebelAggie

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gm280 Thank you for that information and advice. I will surely keep that at the forefront of my mind while doing the wiring set-up
 
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