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Popular Mechanics 1962 PM38 Build [SPLASHED 2017]

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  • Popular Mechanics 1962 PM38 Build [SPLASHED 2017]

    Hi All,

    This past summer the wife and I decided that a little boat would be fun to tool around the lake we have nearby. While shopping around for a small used boat I came across some information about the PM38 published in Popular Mechanics back in August of 1962. Both of us liked the design so I got this crazy idea of trying to build one. I have never done anything like this before, although I did take wood shop back in school many years ago. From the start I decided to take it slow and possibly have it ready by summer 2016.

    For anyone not familiar with the PM38, you can look here to see information about it.

    So far I have the transom, frames #2 and #4 as well as the stem ready. I have also prepared the keelson and the A-frames so the next step is to start assembling those parts. Once that is complete the chines are next. So I haven't made it too far yet. I am building it in my garage and because the temperatures are dipping down around freezing I have to take a break until it starts getting warm again. The glue needs at least 55F.

    In the meantime I am shopping around for the items I will need to be able to take her out once she's finished. So far I have the following:

    - A Kainer steering wheel from the 1950's with the drum for pulley/tiller type steering.
    - A set of pulleys for the steering system.
    - A 1980 25HP Mercury outboard with electric start and the MerControl remote control.

    I still need a pair of control cables for throttle and shift and a few other minor items that I will pick up as I find them.

    My plan is, once the hull is ready, to cover it with a few coats of epoxy resin and then a couple of coats of a nice marine paint to protect the resin from the sun.
    I also decided to thicken the transom a bit by adding an extra sheet of plywood. Other than that I am trying to stay as true to the original plans as I can. The wood I am sourcing from a local lumber yard who carries marine grade plywood. They don't carry Fir lumber so I have opted for Ash which is nice and strong.

    Well, that's it for now. As I progress I will add updates here but for now I don't expect to continue with the build until March or April time frame.

    Transom:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Transom_1.jpg Views:	2 Size:	180.5 KB ID:	10096948

    Frame #2:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Frame-2.jpg Views:	2 Size:	238.9 KB ID:	10096950

    Frame #4:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Frame-4.jpg Views:	2 Size:	232.2 KB ID:	10096952

    Testing how the pieces fit together:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	TestAssembly.jpg Views:	2 Size:	229.3 KB ID:	10096954

    Steering Wheel:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	SteeringWheel.jpg Views:	2 Size:	186.6 KB ID:	10096956

    Mercury Motor (needs new decals):
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Mercury.jpg Views:	2 Size:	205.9 KB ID:	10096958
    Attached Files
    Last edited by jbcurt00; January 6th, 2018, 09:51 AM.
    Current project: (none)
    Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
    Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
    Neat process for steam bending in place
    Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

  • #2
    Looks like a fun project ! I'll tag along for the ride !
    Good luck !
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    '64 MFG Rebuild
    MFG forum thread https://forums.iboats.com/mfg/64-edin...ay-524708.html
    https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ve-the-manatee
    https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...at-restoration

    Comment


    • #3
      Is the 80s Merc setup to use cable/pulley steering?

      Otherwise, nice looking 60s plans, great for 2 up cruising.

      Look forward to seeing progress
      Money spent @ Boat Restoration should be measured in Smiles & Pride SHOP IBOATS-BOAT SPECS-FORUM HELP-REPAIR/RESTO

      Comment


      • #4
        Good start on a boat you will call all your own. She is gonna be a nice little speedster. Good to another woodie project, we don't have many.

        iboats has all the pulleys and springs you need. The only thing you might have trouble finding is the bracket for the steering arm on the Merc. You have time to find that or easy enough to fab up if you can't find one.

        We have threads with diagrams of how to rig the cable/pulley steering, too.
        BOAT SPECS FORUM HELP STARCRAFT FORUM SHOP iboats
        Please, no PM's (Private Messages) regarding boat/engine problems.
        That is what the forums are for.
        Only forum/moderator issues will be answered in PM's.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, the motor has the bracket in the front where the cable/pulley connector attaches. So it is all ready for it. Now I just need the boat finished.
          Current project: (none)
          Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
          Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
          Neat process for steam bending in place
          Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

          Comment


          • #6
            Very nice!!!

            A couple of things. Nothing wrong with traditional cable steering, just be sure to through bolt all the associated hardware, pulleys etc (NO wood screws).
            Do you still have a chance to make a change on your plywood?...... Ash is not all that rot resistant (a bit surprised you were able to find ' ash marine ply'). I personally would go with just Doug fir ACX over the ash.
            You have a good start on it,.. Enjoy!
            As for covering it with epoxy, you will need to incorporate some glass cloth in there, 4 or 6 oz cloth set in the epoxy would be fine.
            Last edited by Ned L; January 1st, 2016, 10:24 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Now that will be cool. My very 1st boat was a 12' plywood runabout that had a late 50's 18hp Evinrude with cable steering. Gee, that was way back in 1966-67.


              1984 Lund S14 DLX, 35hp Evinrude on a Spartan Roller Tilt trailer. Sold to little brother.
              1988 Alumacraft Classic 16 under reconstruction.
              1984 Sea Nymph FM144 Pike Attacker, 1994 Johnson 30hp

              195? Rich Line 14', the stump bumber

              Comment


              • #8
                Ned L, I had pondered how to anchor the pulleys etc. and you confirmed what I thought would be stronger and better. I don't think I will go through the hull but definitely the frames and I may go through the transom to make sure the pulleys stay in place. Also, I am using Ash for the non-plywood parts inside the boat. Come to think of it, I don't actually know what the plywood is made of. I do know it is marine grade so it should be good. You think glass cloth will be needed? I have seen others not do that and still get a good results.

                Thanks everyone for the kind words! I'm looking forward to take the wife out for a ride and the kids to fish.
                Current project: (none)
                Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
                Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
                Neat process for steam bending in place
                Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

                Comment


                • #9
                  IMO, you could probably just use cloth across the corners and joints as a compromise between total coverage w cloth and not using any cloth.

                  Thats the only place I used cloth on my small knock down kayak/canoe project. I wasnt using epoxy though:
                  http://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...started-it-all

                  Adding cloth to the epoxy will make it a more rugged boat in general, plus it will resist bottom damage more then epoxy alone would.

                  Last wood boat I followed during construction used fairly lightweight cloth everywhere but the bottom and up about 6in above the chine. There he used a couple layers of a heavier weave.

                  The bottom was painted up to the waterline, so any hint of the cloth was well masked. The lighter cloth everywhere else went clear w epoxy, so after multiple coats of varnish/poly/spar it you couldnt see it either. Just the nice mahogany planks.

                  I dont recall how Sean handled the epoxy w or w out cloth, but it was a fantastic build:
                  http://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ild-crackerbox

                  Warning: be prepared for the ending, Sean's project was lost at sea.

                  How are you sealing the frames and etc that make up the framework?
                  Last edited by jbcurt00; January 1st, 2016, 02:46 PM.
                  Money spent @ Boat Restoration should be measured in Smiles & Pride SHOP IBOATS-BOAT SPECS-FORUM HELP-REPAIR/RESTO

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    jbcurt00, I may reconsider on the cloth then. I'll take a look at those other threads you included the links for. As far as sealing the internal frames etc, I had planned to just use epoxy resin and then paint over that to add UV protection. Is there a better way I should consider? I have also planned to make some flooring out of some 3/8" or 1/2" plywood so we're not stepping directly on the inside of the hull and the battens.
                    Current project: (none)
                    Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
                    Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
                    Neat process for steam bending in place
                    Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Epoxy and paint sounds good for the frames and etc

                      If you dont have 100% of the lumber for the structure yet, might consider white oak instead of ash. But it has to be white oak. Lots of genericly described oak, is red oak because it tends to finish better. Red is not a good choice for boat building.

                      If it was mine to build and I could afford it, a slat deck out of mahogany would be my 1st choice.
                      Money spent @ Boat Restoration should be measured in Smiles & Pride SHOP IBOATS-BOAT SPECS-FORUM HELP-REPAIR/RESTO

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When I got started and couldn't find Fir I had read Ash was suitable for boat building and went with that. What is your main reason for suggesting I use White Oak? Is it durability (as in rot resistance etc) or is it that the hull wouldn't be strong? I have bought some of the lumber and will need more. I have a piece of Ash for the keelson but could get Oak instead if that would help make the hull stronger. I also need lumber for the chines and could go with white oak there as well. How does it bend? It is fairly easy to steam bend?
                        Current project: (none)
                        Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
                        Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
                        Neat process for steam bending in place
                        Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Does the plan suggest steam bending?

                          White oak steam bends into a much tighter radius then ash would, w fewer fracture/failures.

                          White Oak is more rot resistant then the ash, and for parts and pieces that will be buried in the structure of the boat (hard to remove/replace) I'd use it over ash.
                          Money spent @ Boat Restoration should be measured in Smiles & Pride SHOP IBOATS-BOAT SPECS-FORUM HELP-REPAIR/RESTO

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ash is NOT all the bad for boat building. Just depends on where you'll be using it. I think you'll find this an interesting read...https://www.glen-l.com/wood-plywood/bb-chap5c.html Since all the wood will be epoxy encapsulated it's almost a moot point nowadays. As long as your joinery and building techniques are sound the boat will be a seaworthy vessel that will last for a good long time as long as you exercise proper care and maintenance.

                            What part of the country do you live in? What are your most common Native types of wood? Do you have any local sawyers/mills where you can get quartersawn lumber?
                            Last edited by Woodonglass; January 1st, 2016, 05:31 PM.
                            1961 Lonestar Flamingo - SPLASHED...Kinda!!
                            Fabricating Decks, Stringers, and Transoms
                            Paint Your Boat with Tractor Paint...Say What!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
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                              Yes, the chines need to be steam bent as well as some of the plywood in the front and the sheer and spray rails. So based on what you are suggesting I may use white oak for the chines, keelson and bottom battens for sure. They would be difficult to replace later. Thanks for the tips and information!
                              Current project: (none)
                              Scrapped project: Glen-L 20' 6" Party Boat (Glen-L Listing)
                              Previous project: 1962 PM38 Build [Splashed in 2017]
                              Neat process for steam bending in place
                              Paint your boat with Tractor paint!

                              Comment

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