New to iboats hello..

powers55

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Aug 1, 2020
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18
Hello to all, just trying to find a good site to share knowledge and maybe (just maybe) learn a thing or two.
I recently purchased a vintage 1968 Evinrude Big twin 40 hp outboard for my 15 foot StarCraft Nova. It was stored inside for over 20 plus years, and is in excellent shape. The previous owner did the points and condenser, it has close to 127 lbs. of compression, and very strong spark, and starts right up.

I've heard many great things about these engines, are they truly bullet proof ( if taken care of?)
thanks Chris
 
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dwco5051

Commander
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Messages
2,098
I've heard many great things about these engines, are they truly bullet proof ( if taken care of?)
thanks Chris
Pretty much so. Find an old factory service manual on the internet. Easy to work on and parts are available and not that expensive. A little thirsty on gas but if you life cycle the cost of a new one against it you will still be way ahead. Anyone with average mechanical skills can fix them which is good because most shops don't work on old motors so it is mostly a DIY project. Thirty bucks will buy a new set of ignition coils. Shop repair of ignition problems on today's motors can easily run up to a grand. That will buy a lot of fuel.
 

powers55

Cadet
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
18
Pretty much so. Find an old factory service manual on the internet. Easy to work on and parts are available and not that expensive. A little thirsty on gas but if you life cycle the cost of a new one against it you will still be way ahead. Anyone with average mechanical skills can fix them which is good because most shops don't work on old motors so it is mostly a DIY project. Thirty bucks will buy a new set of ignition coils. Shop repair of ignition problems on today's motors can easily run up to a grand.

Pretty much so. Find an old factory service manual on the internet. Easy to work on and parts are available and not that expensive. A little thirsty on gas but if you life cycle the cost of a new one against it you will still be way ahead. Anyone with average mechanical skills can fix them which is good because most shops don't work on old motors so it is mostly a DIY project. Thirty bucks will buy a new set of ignition coils. Shop repair of ignition problems on today's motors can easily run up to a grand. That will buy a lot of fuel.
They built real engines back in the day, this engine was built when i was three years old, and is still around 54 years later, and that to me means a lot! it also brings back fond memories of when my father took us out on the water, and how much fun we all had. There's just to much emissions junk and technology on these engines of today, be lucky if they even last 5 to 7 years i tell ya
 

powers55

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Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
18
First thing you Must do before running it, is to drop the Lower Unit and replace the Water Pump Impeller
View attachment 367374
Great advise, thank you! I'm pretty mechanically inclined I've been a GM guy since i started driving back in 79 and I'm 57 now, is this task that difficult? I only ask because i haven't worked on hardly any marine engines at all. i was also thinking of rebuilding the carburetor as well, i spoke to a gentlemen from MarineEngines.com here in Vermont there based out of Brandon VT i think, and he told me just to stay away from the China rebuild kits and other parts from them for that matter, and go with TRUE OEM parts when servicing this unit. also i did order a service manual for this engine i have as well as a parts manual to.
 

jimmbo

Supreme Mariner
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
10,895
Once you rebuild and reinstall the Carb, you have to make sure the Synchronization between the Timing Advance and Carb are correct. These are from a 50 yr old 3rd party Service Manual, one of the better 3rd party manuals

img178.jpgimg179.jpgimg180.jpgimg181.jpgimg182.jpgimg183.jpgimg184.jpgimg185.jpgimg186.jpgimg187.jpgimg188.jpg
 

ski2rule

Seaman Apprentice
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
49
Great advise, thank you! I'm pretty mechanically inclined I've been a GM guy since i started driving back in 79 and I'm 57 now, is this task that difficult? I only ask because i haven't worked on hardly any marine engines at all. i was also thinking of rebuilding the carburetor as well, i spoke to a gentlemen from MarineEngines.com here in Vermont there based out of Brandon VT i think, and he told me just to stay away from the China rebuild kits and other parts from them for that matter, and go with TRUE OEM parts when servicing this unit. also i did order a service manual for this engine i have as well as a parts manual to.
Not hard to do the impeller, make sure you have the shift linkage in the same position when reconnecting, water tubes line up, and don't lose the key on the shaft.
 

airshot

Commander
Joined
Jul 22, 2008
Messages
2,207
Those were good motors, as a kid I remember skiing behind one on my Das old 16' Lyman, in fact it pulled two of us without a problem. Today they claim you need at least a 75 hp to get a skier up....not built like they used to be....
 

powers55

Cadet
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
18
Not hard to do the impeller, make sure you have the shift linkage in the same position when reconnecting, water tubes line up, and don't lose the key on the shaft.
I did just receive the correct shop manual, so i will be doing the impeller as well, i was lucky to find such an engine like this in the condition for short money. I beet 4 other folks to the sale, almost a 400 mile round trip but worth it.
 

powers55

Cadet
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
18
Those were good motors, as a kid I remember skiing behind one on my Das old 16' Lyman, in fact it pulled two of us without a problem. Today they claim you need at least a 75 hp to get a skier up....not built like they used to be....
Agreed!! I'm 57 years old, and that engine was built when i was 3 years old, in my opinion, any engine that that runs 53 years later (if taken care of) certainly was not built from cheap engineering or cheap parts such as the junk being made today!!
 

JimS123

Admiral
Joined
Jul 27, 2007
Messages
7,315
Agreed!! I'm 57 years old, and that engine was built when i was 3 years old, in my opinion, any engine that that runs 53 years later (if taken care of) certainly was not built from cheap engineering or cheap parts such as the junk being made today!!
I'm 72 and the Evinrude Big Twin on my Lyman was built when I was only 3 years old as well.

My first OB was a '68 40 hp Lark. Similar to yours but with electric shifting.
 

powers55

Cadet
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
18
I'm 72 and the Evinrude Big Twin on my Lyman was built when I was only 3 years old as well.

My first OB was a '68 40 hp Lark. Similar to yours but with electric shifting.
basically the same engine? right.. just electric shift? I'm going to post some pictures of mine, and you'd think it came right off the showroom floor.. and the guy who sold it to me, has almost 50 years in the marine engine business, and he seems to think that it has no more then 100 hours on it. How he would know this i don't know this? anyway to tell?
 
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