Kicker on a CC?

SkaterRace

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Ended up going to talk to my marine mechanic and he said almost never works on a CC and doesn't know how he would install one so would have to bill me to research. I found some brackets that I am going to run by him and we are going to run it as a pull start, and hook up a steering link to the main engine. Will have to sort out controls as we are planning to use a tiller motor. The idea is set a single trolling speed and steer from the helm.

Going with a 6 gallon fuel tank that will replace the livewell (more so go inside it inside another sealed layer). That will be the second fuel source if we can get it to work and if we can not then going to run a hose to the main tank and just run a shut off valve to make it work.

I was thinking I might do some of the work myself but am starting to rethink that with how easy it would be to screw up the transom and fuel lines.
 

JimS123

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Sounds like your mechanic just doesn't want to be bothered with it. He probably never did it before.

The pic in post #4 is a CC. It was taken on the Niagara River, but that boat is also used annually on the St. Lawrence.

The steering rod is a piece of cake. Threaded rod and QD end fittings using existing holes on each motor. The bracket is a fixed mount. When not in use the kicker is tilted up out of the water. Note the access panel above it. That allowed easy access to drilling holes and bolting the bracket on. If all else fails a hole can be drilled and your own access port can be installed.

That whole setup was done in my home garage.
 

airshot

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Being the old guy here, I was raised to be self sufficient, so I apply this to my boating as well. I carry what I need to get me back in case of a failure. In my 60 plus years of boating never needed a tow, always had a way to get back.. I try to think of every scenario I could run into, reading these forums and learning what others have run into has helped me understand what I need to get back or solve an issue on the water. Just me I guess....
 

airshot

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I know more than a couple of guys with over 3,000 hours on their 4 stroke outboards.

What was the life expectancy of a 2 stroke built in 1997? Hint….. replaced my first power head at 1,800 hours as PM
Co
nsider cost to begin with....can't compare a new 20 grand motor to a used two stroke. I can honestly say, in my over 60 years of boating I have never wore out or needed a rebuild in a boat engine. I used my boats a lot, on the water whenever the weather permitted, but also maintained them. My current 1992 has been run a long time by all of its owners, but still runs like new and looks like new. Would be really difficult to justify 9 K for a new one.
 

JimS123

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Being the old guy here, I was raised to be self sufficient, so I apply this to my boating as well. I carry what I need to get me back in case of a failure. In my 60 plus years of boating never needed a tow, always had a way to get back.. I try to think of every scenario I could run into, reading these forums and learning what others have run into has helped me understand what I need to get back or solve an issue on the water. Just me I guess....
I was raised the same way as well, but you know how "best laid plans" go.

Did a tune-up on Friday. Saturday went fishing. Half way there the engine died. No problem, right? Yeah, right. Dropped the kicker in the water and she immediately started spewing gas all over the place. First time needed a tow.

Turned out the brand new condenser failed the first time out. Next week I installed a pertronics electronic ignition that lasted me another 20 years.

The plastic cover on the kicker's fuel filter cracked. It was a hot day. Now I keep one of those as a spare.
 

airshot

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Yessir...." Best laid plans". How many times have we heard that ??
 

SkaterRace

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Sounds like your mechanic just doesn't want to be bothered with it. He probably never did it before.

The pic in post #4 is a CC. It was taken on the Niagara River, but that boat is also used annually on the St. Lawrence.

The steering rod is a piece of cake. Threaded rod and QD end fittings using existing holes on each motor. The bracket is a fixed mount. When not in use the kicker is tilted up out of the water. Note the access panel above it. That allowed easy access to drilling holes and bolting the bracket on. If all else fails a hole can be drilled and your own access port can be installed.

That whole setup was done in my home garage.
I've been around this area give or take 100km for most of my life and have seen maybe 20 in total and all are in the last few years. The marina he is at is 90% aluminum fishing boats and 30-35ft cruisers so while they are around he more than likely has not seen many before and never done a kicker on one. He seemed pretty worried about it. I will probably end up attempting it myself and have a friend of a friend who is a marine mechanic with his own mobile business so give him a call if I mess anything up or am likely to.

The worry is more getting fuel sorted out than anything. Bracket and steering should be pretty easy.
 

racerone

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This why so many experienced people who venture far from home go with twin engines.
 

dingbat

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This why so many experienced people who venture far from home go with twin engines.
Then why is there more and more single engine craft fishing offshore every year?

Why so many single engine inboards on the fishing grounds?

The real answer is you no longer need twin 150 hp to get above 300 hp.
 
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SkaterRace

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This why so many experienced people who venture far from home go with twin engines.
They don't make twins in my size boat. If I go up to a 25ft which has twins then I am in a bigger slip which is harder to get, burns a ton more fuel, and higher maintenance costs.

I'd love a twin boat and my goal of a kicker is partly to close the gap from what I have to a twin. Now there is not much reason to go twins other than redundancy.
 

racerone

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It should be made mandatory to have a kicker at 5 to10% of main power to go far out on the " great " lakes.
 

SkaterRace

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It should be made mandatory to have a kicker at 5 to10% of main power to go far out on the " great " lakes.
Is that really the power I should be looking at for the great lakes? I am on the St Lawerence and Lake Ontario.
 

racerone

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I once towed a stranded 18' boat about 3 /4 miles to a harbor.-----Mother / daughter / boyfriend .----Time was about 7 PM.----Flat calm water.------Was out testing my boat.------They were waving paddles and lifejackets.-----First thing they said was ---" are we happy to see you "-----Their radio did not work , motor had refused to start.----They thought they might have to spend the night out there on Lake Huron.-----So with a kicker you can make progress to shore and I would say that has to be a " good feeling "----
 

airshot

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I once towed a stranded 18' boat about 3 /4 miles to a harbor.-----Mother / daughter / boyfriend .----Time was about 7 PM.----Flat calm water.------Was out testing my boat.------They were waving paddles and lifejackets.-----First thing they said was ---" are we happy to see you "-----Their radio did not work , motor had refused to start.----They thought they might have to spend the night out there on Lake Huron.-----So with a kicker you can make progress to shore and I would say that has to be a " good feeling "----
Unfortunately, there are way to many folks out on the water in boats that are not in proper running order ! In my 60 yrs if boating I have towed numerous boats, lucky for me, never been towed yet ! I never leave the dock unless everything is in proper working order !! At out local launch ramp, about 10-15% of boats being launched, have issues before leaving the dock, but they go out anyway. I often see them sitting a couple miles off shore waving a flag or with their engine covers off !! Makes no sense to me !!
 

airshot

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Then why is there more and more single engine craft fishing offshore every year?

Why so many single engine inboards on the fishing grounds?

The real answer is you no longer need twin 150 hp to get above 300 hp.
Honestly...who can afford twin engines today ?? Just look me Auto's and trucks, these are much more reliable than in the old days, they claim breakdowns are more rare...at our local marina, there are a number of newer boat owners that might argue that point, but that is what the stats show !
 

racerone

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Design / size of the boat comes into the picture.-----In rough weather some boats can survive hrs waiting for rescue.------Others may need the high school wrastling champion and a large bucket.
 
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dingbat

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Honestly...who can afford twin engines today ??
Someone obviously........local marinas are full of twin outboard powered boats.

Pretty much the norm for a 25' (600 hp) outboard powered boats. Triples are common once you hit the 36' (900 hp) mark.

Just look me Auto's and trucks, these are much more reliable than in the old days, they claim breakdowns are more rare...at our local marina, there are a number of newer boat owners that might argue that point, but that is what the stats show !
The commercial guys will be the first to tell you that maintenance, uptime and fuel consumption are all greatly improved with 4 stroke outboards.

Easily put 4,000 - 4,500 hours on a motor. That's an eternity, then some, for a recreational boat owner
 

KJM

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Good idea in principal. However, if you have a fuel problem, neither engine will run. My personal setups have different gas tanks for the main and kicker. Also the mains are electric start, while the kickers are manual. If the battery goes dead, my kicker will always run.
Yeah, one of my tow ins was fuel related, the other was electrical.
 

JimS123

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Show of hands... who wants to trade in their (new) 4 stroke for a 20+ year old, oil belching 2 stroke?
Well, now wait a minute.

My family boat and my fishing boat have 4-strokes. But my old classic woodie sports a 24:1 stinkpot that even uses a pressurized tank because it has no fuel pump.

Surely, I could put a newfangled engine on her, but when she goes to the Antique Boat Shows she would be disqualified because of not having period correct parts.

Besides, being in an old boat smelling all that burning oil reminds me of my youth. Those were the best days of my life.

With the world at war and the US in a civil war, I relish all that stink.....

And as usual, JMPO.
 
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