Charging trolling motor batteries

livinitlovinit

Recruit
Joined
Jun 22, 2022
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2
I'm new at this game. I'd like to add a trolling motor to my Carolina Skiff 218 DLV. I know I'll need at least 24 volts. I keep the boat in dry storage and there is no option to plug into battery chargers. Short of removing the batteries each time to bring home and charge, what are my options? Thanks.
 

JASinIL2006

Vice Admiral
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,173
If there is no way to get power to batteries while the boat is stored, I don't see any option besides lugging batteries.
 

ThomW

Chief Petty Officer
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Aug 8, 2016
Messages
513
I may be mistaken, but I believe that the onboard chargers take power from the motor--either an alternator or stater--depending on the motor-- and convert that AC power to DC power to charge the batteries while you would be under way and using the motor.

Again, this is only my assumption and I stand to be corrected.
 

JASinIL2006

Vice Admiral
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,173
Most of the onboard chargers I've heard about (for example, see link below) use 110v AC to power the charger. It doesn't sound like you have access to that, unless there is some way to hook up solar panels.

Depending on what kind of motor you have, you might be able to use the current generated by the alternator to charge batteries, but I would think that would only be practical if you weren't discharging the trolling motor batteries very much.

 

Scott Danforth

Grumpy old guy who plays with boats
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
40,262
there are DC to DC converters. these can provide X amps at 24 volts from 2.25X amps at 12 volts. these basically turn 12 volts to AC, then AC back to DC all within its self. however these would require you to ride around in your boat for a really long time to charge the batteries. lets say you are fishing for 10 hours, expect to have to drive around for 4 hours or more to charge the batteries back up

Solar Panels were brought up. there are 24 volt 10 amp solar panels that you could have rigged up in your storage area that would charge the batteries. most dry storage units would not allow you to install and wire a solar panel to their facility

however the safest bet is to pull the batteries at the end of the night, bring them home and charge them
 

Silvertip

Supreme Mariner
Joined
Sep 22, 2003
Messages
28,662
$300 gets you an inverter generator. Charge the batteries at the storage facility when you get home (not before you leave). It is a bad idea to leave the batteries even partially discharged for long periods of storage. You can also charge the batteries from the tow vehicle on the trip home. May not fully top them off but better than leaving them deeply discharged.
 
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