Can Rollers Damage the hull?

PRC7020

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  1. I am considering a 2022 Bulls Bay 230 and heard that if I put it on a trailer with rollers that it could cause dimples in the hull. Is this accurate information or an indication that the boat is made with a thin hull and lacks quality?
 
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stresspoint

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yes and no ,
rollers can cause indents in a hull if the rollers are not correctly placed to even the load .
also if the roller set is placed where there are weak areas in the hull , like for instance between stringers you will be sure to get some abnormality's in the hull over time.

a properly set up trailer and you will not have any problems.
 

racerone

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Also think about hitting bumps or a railway track.----The more rollers ( in the correct place ) the better in supporting the load.-----Bunk trailers do a better job on rough bumpy roads.
 

WIMUSKY

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The rear roller should be as close to the transom as possible so the hull doesn't develop a hook.... The transom needs to be properly supported.. Bunks or rollers...
 

JimS123

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In my 55 years of boat ownership of countless boats, wood, glass and aluminum I have never had a dent in the hull, or any other damage for that matter. I will only own roller trailers.

There are roller trailers and there are roller trailers. The "good" ones carry a small amount of weight on each roller. The cheepies carry a LOT of weight. You get what you pay for.

Many years ago the spec was (boat weight / number rollers) = max 125. I have seen some of the cheap ones carry over 200 pounds. My current trailer was a custom setup and I carry 85 pounds per roller. I can literally turn each roller by hand.
 

airshot

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Yep....if you have enough rollers you wont have a problem. My 22' Islander (aluminum) has set on a roller trailer since new in 1983 and still to this day. No dents or humps in the hull !!
 

kenny nunez

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I have been told that Boston Whaler will not warrant a hull if it is on a roller trailer. I have no problem with them but needless to say they make it easy to accidentally launch the boat on the ground if you are not careful.
 

WIMUSKY

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I'm a big shoreland'r roller fan.... That's all I've owned. Had a big 24' 'glass cuddy too... Maybe they're considered cheap, but I and 3 family members like them... And were all into Crestliners. Never owned anything else....😊
 

JimS123

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I have been told that Boston Whaler will not warrant a hull if it is on a roller trailer. I have no problem with them but needless to say they make it easy to accidentally launch the boat on the ground if you are not careful.
Never believe what you are "told". Do your own research. The valid info is provided on the manufacture's web site.

I HAVE a Whaler, so I have their Owner's Manual. They will permit bunk trailers, but their #1 recommendation is full keel rollers and side bunks. The spec is to alleviate a delamination between the hull and the inside structural foam. The keel is several inches thick, so rollers aren't an issue in that location.

As such, my custom made Whaler trailer has self-centering poly rollers on every cross-member, and EZslides on the bunks. People are in awe how easy I launch and load, all by myself.

There is a manual (or "book" if you read) that details how to launch and retrieve a trailer boat. You don't have to be "careful", you simply need to read the manual. After backing in the launch ramp until the tires are barely in the water, then and only then do you release the winch cable and safety chain.

It is literally impossible to launch a boat in the parking lot unless you didn't read the directions.
 

flashback

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Any way you cut it, bunks distribute the load over a much larger area and both need to be set properly.. roller or bunk.
 

kenny nunez

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No doubt about bunk style trailers, almost every boat I have owned over the last 45 years have had them and the last 3 I added the plastic slides.
In the 30+ years that I had a stern drive repair shop I saw my share of dimpled hulls from not enough roller support. Another cause of hull damage is when the leaf springs become rusted and no longer flex making the trailer‘s tires the only suspension. You cannot beat “torflex“ axels for a smoother ride.
Also at least 2 instances where the drive was damaged when the owner‘s friend unhooked the bow eye thinking he was helping and the boat “pre launched” on the ramp. Human error, not the trailer’s fault.
 

bruceb58

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You cannot beat “torflex“ axels for a smoother ride.
I own both leaf spring trailers and a torsion axle trailer. There is no difference in ride. Personally, if I had a choice, I would never own a torsion axle trailer.

 

airshot

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I own both leaf spring trailers and a torsion axle trailer. There is no difference in ride. Personally, if I had a choice, I would never own a torsion axle trailer.

I would tend to agree, from those I know that own them, the ride might be better but issues developed with age. They are more expensive to repair/replace when the time comes.
 

bruceb58

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I would tend to agree, from those I know that own them, the ride might be better but issues developed with age. They are more expensive to repair/replace when the time comes.
Too may bent spindles on torsion axles. Very common issue unless you never drive a road with potholes LOL.
 
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