1989 Johnson 60HP J60ELCEA VRO

Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
11
Looking for help in validating that the pickup assembly in the tank has failed. I've read the articles, and no I'm not interested in pre-mixing my gas. That being said, the alarm sounds continuously when the key is turned on. Disconnecting the wiring to the VRO tank, the alarm stops. I see there's a small metal washer on top of a pin on the pickup assembly, which goes through what I believe to be the float assembly. Seems odd that the washer is metal and not some better flotation device. When the washer sits across the contacts, I get a read across the side arms, and when the pin/wash rises the circuit is open. So I'm thinking the problem is at the top of the sending unit where the wires go in. That circuit it closed in the off position, causing the alarm to sound. Does anyone know if that circuit is suppose to be open or closed in the off position? I'm thinking is should be closed by default, then when oil level is good and pressure is good, that circuit would then open, meaning that the alarm would sound until the motor was running and creating a vacuum on the sending unit. A detailed description on exactly how that unit works would be most appreciated. Thanks!
 

emdsapmgr

Supreme Mariner
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Dec 9, 2005
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11,551
You may be trying to fix the wrong problem. The service manual or the owner's manual for your engine should identify the types of warning horns for your engine. Usually, the warning horns (on a 1990 model, for instance) are: Overheat: constant horn. Low oil in tank: horn sounds intermittently: for 1/2 second, every 20 seconds. No oil at pump: horn sounds rapid beeps: on-1/2 second, off 1/2 second. Check the overheat cyl head temp sensor, then make sure the horn itself is not malfunctioning. The only time I've heard of a constant horn for low oil is when you have a mismatched oil tank (wrong year tank) with that year's engine. I have that issue with my 1992 70 hp engine with the wrong year tank. I get a constant horn when the oil level is below 1/4 full. The low-level oil sensor shorts to ground, setting off the horn. Filling the oil tank silences the horn for the whole summer's running.
 

boobie

Supreme Mariner
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Nov 5, 2009
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20,808
Prior to '96 OMC had trouble with the oil tanks giving off false signals due to the electronics in the oil tank sender .When you say you disconnected the tank wire and the alarm shut, that's a good clue. Sounds like EMDS has a tank made after '96.or else his is working properly.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
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When reading through the manual, there were different warning sounds listed, but none listed a constant alarm. Given the single wire connection to the thermostat, I assume that once it reaches temperature that it would create the ground and give a constant alarm. The manual says the way to test it, is to put a jumper wire from ground to the wire connection just before the thermostat. Sure enough it alarms. This test was done with the oil sender disconnected, so the circuit had no other grounds available. I also took the thermostat out and heated it up to test, but I don't remember now if I put it to ground. Also, with the VRO disconnected, when you turn the key to the on position, it alarms and quickly dies, making me think that validates the diode in the circuit. The dealer says he would need the whole boat, not just the tank & sender unit, so I'm gambling if I do that. I was hoping for a simple ohm test across the oil sending unit circuit would validate, because I'm showing closed by default. I'll grab some more oil and fill the half-filled tank up and see what happens. I'm also investigating weather I have the right tank or not.
 

Bosunsmate

Admiral
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Apr 7, 2012
Messages
6,129
When reading through the manual, there were different warning sounds listed, but none listed a constant alarm. Given the single wire connection to the thermostat, I assume that once it reaches temperature that it would create the ground and give a constant alarm. The manual says the way to test it, is to put a jumper wire from ground to the wire connection just before the thermostat. Sure enough it alarms. This test was done with the oil sender disconnected, so the circuit had no other grounds available. I also took the thermostat out and heated it up to test, but I don't remember now if I put it to ground. Also, with the VRO disconnected, when you turn the key to the on position, it alarms and quickly dies, making me think that validates the diode in the circuit. The dealer says he would need the whole boat, not just the tank & sender unit, so I'm gambling if I do that. I was hoping for a simple ohm test across the oil sending unit circuit would validate, because I'm showing closed by default. I'll grab some more oil and fill the half-filled tank up and see what happens. I'm also investigating weather I have the right tank or not.
Thats not the thermostat, thats the overheat sensor
 

Bosunsmate

Admiral
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Apr 7, 2012
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6,129
Thats how it should be a quick chirp then silence so it sounds like you are on the right track, dealer would require a full wallet too
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
11
I ordered the VRO Oil Tank kit. Shopping around, I found it on eBay and made a bargain offer that was accepted. What's interesting, is after all was settled, I realized it was from a heating/air supply house 1500 miles away, and 2 minutes from my old house. With those odds, I'm glad I bought a couple powerball tickets.I'll double-check the overheat sensor as well, thank you for the correction.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
11
Got the "NEW OMC EVINRUDE JOHNSON 175954 OIL PICK UP KIT 5008618" and it worked. My suggestion to the next person who has a problem with the constant alarm, turn the key on to activate the alarm, then disconnect the tan wire at the motor which comes from the oil tank. If the alarm turns off, the oil pick-up is the issue. Take the pickup unit out of the tank and make sure there's no obstruction at the float pin, both top and bottom (could hang on filter). If that's ok, then the problem is in the head of the pick-up kit. Of course I read the installation instructions last, which I wish I had read first. I know I'm not alone. Thank you to those that responded, always appreciate a second pair of eyes.
 
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