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1963 LoneStar El Dorado Restoration

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  • 1963 LoneStar El Dorado Restoration

    Greetings, I found this website while researching information related to Lone Star Boats. I purchased a 1963 Lone Star El Dorado in August of this year with great anticipation of restoring her. As of today, I have all but stripped this vessel down to bare metal, should be completed today.

    There are several minor issues as one would expect with such an old boat, but only a few of concern. As a retired Coast Guard Veteran, I have many years of experience working with metal boats, in regards to the cosmetic aspects. (never could get a grip on engines lol), so prepping the hull has been pretty routine. However, there are several loose (Spinning) rivets on the bottom that I would like to replace. Being new to riveting I am wondering if any of you have restored a similar vessel and if so, what size blind rivets should I use for replacement? I realize too, that I will probably get twenty responses telling me about the wonders of "Gluvit", and I know that it will have its place in this restoration. But, I would really like to do this properly so any input regarding rivet size and where to purchase them would be greatly appreciated.

    Hopefully I have attached the photos correctly to give an idea of what I bought and where I am in the restoration process for your review. Thanks in advance, I look forward to sharing more soon.

  • #2
    Welcome to the forums.

    Rivets on the bottom will be solid rivets, not blind and will require 2 people to install. Watermann is the guru for rivets. Might want to read up here https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owne...nd-more-rivets

    He'll most likely chime in soon.

    Looks like a fun project.
    - Eric

    Somers, WI

    Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice boat you have there and good luck. the 2 fellows above mentioned will definitely set you in the right direction!
      Most times I'm wrong, Most times I stand corrected..But...Sometimes I'm right.
      1983 SportCraft Deep V OSFF 222 Cuddy Rehab
      https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ddy-walkaround
      https://forums.iboats.com/forum/engin...-new-fuel-pump

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, and yes you are correct, not sure why I posted blind rivets. Really interested in length and diameter, hope to hear from him. In the mean time I will go check out the link you shared with me.

        Yes, she is a nice boat, tons of character for sure. Only wish previous owners had not taken shortcuts and used crap materials on her in the past. Getting freaking carpet glue off of her has been my biggest nightmare lol. Add to that somebody's incessant need to drill holes and use crappy screws and it's been quite the hoot! Thankfully no serious electrolysis from dissimilar metals.

        Today I am finishing cleaning up her bottom, nothing like dealing with Zinc Chromate dust! This is another thing that made no sense to me. The boat was always trailered, according to the past owner, so why Zinc Chromate? There was no bottom paint, seems to me a two part epoxy barrier coat would have done the trick. But I digress lol.

        Comment


        • #5
          Aluminum needs either a zinc chromate or self etching primer prior to a base primer or peeling is pretty much guaranteed
          - Eric

          Somers, WI

          Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Eric,

            I respectfully disagree. As a retired Bosun, I worked with Aluminum and Steel vessels most of my life. Zinc Chromate does have exceptional adherence, but is generally put down prior to a bottom painting to deter electrolysis caused by the cuprous oxide (copper). Any good two part epoxy polyamide marine primer will have exceptional adherence so long as you properly prep the surface and wash with an etching solution. To boot, Zinc Chromate is a known carginogen and is becoming more and more difficult to obtain. I would agree with you, if this were going to be a boat that would sit in the water for season on end, but for a boat that will be trailered, I see no need to use it. That's just my opinion, but it is an opinion based on years of maintaining Coast Guard UTB's.

            Comment


            • #7
              Interesting. I think most of us use SEP anyway instead of ZC before base priming.
              - Eric

              Somers, WI

              Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

              Comment


              • #8
                Welcome aboard

                Nice LS, glad you saved the old gal and are going to restore her. Luke did a great job on his "Texas Tornado" and I look forward to seeing yours being brought back.

                Yeah just be happy if that's ZC rather than alodine.
                1979 V5 SS140 HP Merc ...... 1970 18' Chieftain IO restoration
                1978 16' SS160 SeaNymph .. 1978 14' Seafarer

                Comment


                • #9
                  I wasn't trying to be rude, hope I didn't come off that way. I was just saying there are safer alternatives. The more than one way to skin a cat approach if you will. All of those years working with high VOC paints and solvents caused my disability. For many years I could barely hold a coffee cup without spilling the entire contents due to the neurological damage. Red Lead primer, Green Death Wash Primer, they gave that crap names for a reason apparently lol. We used to bathe in MEK lol!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No offense taken. At almost 70, I'm still learning a lot every day. With all the chemicals I've dealt with without protection in my life I'm surprised to still be living and in decent health.
                    - Eric

                    Somers, WI

                    Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Okay, so let me throw this out there. I have all of the original badging, brochures, and goodies that came with this boat originally to draw from for her restoration. I'm struggling with whether to restore her to vintage, with some modern conveniences, or to do something similar to what the previous owner had. I kind of like having the steering outside of the cabin so that the cabin can be utilized for over-nighters. Opinions please.

                      Oh and I have a name for her.

                      Wait for it. Wait for it. " The AlumiNaughty". Already have the vinyl cut to lay down on her port and starboard sides upon completion lol.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JSnooky View Post

                        Oh and I have a name for her.

                        Wait for it. Wait for it. " The AlumiNaughty". Already have the vinyl cut to lay down on her port and starboard sides upon completion lol.
                        That is great.
                        Dance with the waves,
                        move with the sea.
                        Let the rhythm of the water
                        set your soul free.

                        1987 Four Winns 170 Horizon.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Truly original - I like it
                          - Eric

                          Somers, WI

                          Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If the bimini will protect you sufficiently from weather, I'd leave the steering where it was. My old Carver had a hard top over the helm section.

                            Click image for larger version

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                            - Eric

                            Somers, WI

                            Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              Originally posted by oldrem View Post
                              If the bimini will protect you sufficiently from weather, I'd leave the steering where it was. My old Carver had a hard top over the helm section.

                              [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"large","data-attachmentid":10684448**[/ATTACH]
                              Eric,
                              That's a nice boat what happened to her? Bump, sorry..
                              Most times I'm wrong, Most times I stand corrected..But...Sometimes I'm right.
                              1983 SportCraft Deep V OSFF 222 Cuddy Rehab
                              https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ddy-walkaround
                              https://forums.iboats.com/forum/engin...-new-fuel-pump

                              Comment

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