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Charging boat battery with truck while driving

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  • #16
    This is a popular DC to DC charger used for RVs. You can get the 20A or 40A model. You want this mounted as close to your boat batteries as possible.

    https://www.amazon.com/Renogy-Batter...s%2C212&sr=8-1

    Put in a dedicated wire with an Anderson connector. I would wire up with at least 8 awg wire. The DC to DC converter will allow some voltage drop but you still want it as low as possible. 40A on a long run can have a lot of voltage drop if you chose the 40A model. Use one of these:
    https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power...0&pageNumber=1
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    • #17
      It would be easier and a lot cheaper to buy a pound of dry ice for the trip.

      Have used dry ice for years to store and transport fish home after a trip.
      ....

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      • #18
        Originally posted by dingbat View Post
        It would be easier and a lot cheaper to buy a pound of dry ice for the trip.

        Have used dry ice for years to store and transport fish home after a trip.
        Not a bad idea, I use dry ice keeping bait frozen in 100*+ weather, and it will keep anchovies rock solid for a day. I don't keep the dry ice cooler inside the boat while sleeping, as it will give off CO2. I toss the cooler out onto the swim platform, so (hopefully) CO2 goes overboard.

        The OP said he was stopping over at WM parking lots for the night, and sleeping in the boat? That and dry ice in the fridge could be a bad combination...

        2001 Crestliner SuperHawk 1800, Mercruiser 140HP
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        • #19
          As someone that is Electrically challenged to the point I need an Electrician to change the batteries in my flashlight is all sounds Greek to me. However what I love about this site is one can learn something everyday. A DC to DC charger is a great advantage for trolling motor batteries forguys I know that do very long isolated Northern Ontario fishing trips where there isn't any Hydro locally. Nothing for these young lads to drive 12 hrs. from one lake to the next. They need to use a generator in the back country to charge the trolling batteries. However if they are 24V not 12V, still doable? Charge 1 at a time perhaps?
          Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by fishrdan View Post
            That and dry ice in the fridge could be a bad combination...

            CO2 isn't CO. CO2 isn't the silent killer like CO, you will wake up gasping and coughing if the concentration gets high enough. Did some really quick envelope math, but a couple of pounds of dry ice in a boat wouldn't be an issue. 10+ pounds would be if the boat was well sealed.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by dingbat View Post
              It would be easier and a lot cheaper to buy a pound of dry ice for the trip.

              Have used dry ice for years to store and transport fish home after a trip.
              I was going to suggest something equally as simple. This is a 26ft boat. I don't know what is being kept in the fridge, but why not just throw a couple of milk jugs filled with ice into a big cooler that sits in the boat during transit? When you put the boat in the water, transfer everything to the fridge and move the cooler to your truck bed while on the water. This avoids the CO/CO2 issues and re-wiring your tow vehicle.

              We have a water-access only property that is 4hrs away and go up multiple times per month throughout the year. I just throw a big cooler in the boat with ice jugs and everything stays fridge-cold until we get to the cabin.

              My neighbor drives from Minnesota to the FL Keys every winter. On the way back, he packs two Yeti coolers full of fish and food and drives home over a few days. All of the filets are still frozen.

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              • #22
                @Scott Danforth; yes 10awg is less expensive, and if I start with a completely charged batteries the current draw will be a lot smaller.
                Those DC connectors are nice. It's the first time I see them at this low price.

                @dingbat; dry ice won't work in my case since the 2 fridges are full of food and there is no more spare. Also, here dry ice is quite expensive, I don't know why.

                @Captain Caveman; yes, transferring my meat and frozen stuff in a cooler with dry ice and put it in the truck would be a solution. But again, dry ice is like $80 for a 18'' X 6'' piece. My friend said he paid that some years ago, and he was not impressed with the time it lasted, he said it was colder though.


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                • #23
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                  Originally posted by Wave34 View Post
                  @Scott Danforth; yes 10awg is less expensive, and if I start with a completely charged batteries the current draw will be a lot smaller.
                  Those DC connectors are nice. It's the first time I see them at this low price.

                  @[B]dingbat; dry ice won't work in my case since the 2 fridges are full of food and there is no more spare. Also, here dry ice is quite expensive, I don't know why.

                  @Captain Caveman; yes, transferring my meat and frozen stuff in a cooler with dry ice and put it in the truck would be a solution. But again, dry ice is like $80 for a 18'' X 6'' piece.
                  Dry ice is -109F. Doesn’t refrigerate per say. It will freeze everything in the cooler to a solid block. The “ice” will be gone but you’ll have no problem storing meat for 3-4 days in a good quality cooler from reside cold.

                  10” x 10” x 2” = #10

                  I buy #5 of dry ice at the local tackle shop for about $7. Can get it for $1 pound with a #10 minimum from local ice house.

                  Local Costco carries it as well.
                  ....

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