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Baitcasting to Spincasting

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  • Baitcasting to Spincasting

    I have a small problem I hope someone can help me with..I primarily bass fish and I am having the worst time with baitcasters.. I have try the baitcasting setup and I find myself spending more time digging out bird nest and being accurate with the dogon thing not to speak of distance, then I am fishing.And to be honest, I gave baitcasting reels the benefit of the doubt for last 2 years. I worked and worked with it and I worked with it and I just can't get the hang of it..i was brought up on spinncasters and that all i know...here is my problem, no matter what oz. bait I throw with a spincaster, I find my rod with an incredibly large bend and having a very heavy draw with the bait as I am reeling it in. It takes great effort to reel in the bait. I see my rod bending, and I'm thinking it's going to brake, and with the heavy draw my hands and arms are getting tired very rapidly..when it come to spinning rod, can anyone advise me on what type of spinning rod I can use that would eliminate the heavy bending.

  • #2
    Sounds like you are not matching your setup to the type of lures you are throwing.
    You need a stiffer rod.

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    • #3
      Mis-matched tackle combined with poor technique account for 90% of newbie casting issues.

      The other 10% is improperly tuned or to put it nicely “under performing” tackle.

      How much weight are you throwing? What rod and reel are you using?

      Must be some pretty wimpy rod if your bending it that bad with bass tackle.
      Last edited by dingbat; November 30th, 2019, 12:20 PM.
      ....

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      • #4
        Thanks for your response, I am using Lew's Baitcaster matched with a 7ft med action X20xpress, I like to throw 3/8 to 1/2.Over the 10 - 12 years I have been using baitcasters, it his been awful, its getting to the point, I don't want to take my boat out anymore and fishing is beginning to be no more fun..I have tried everything from different lines, to different baitcasters, I don't know what the issue is, I own 12 baitcaster and no matter what I do, I cant get the distance I wamt or stop the back lashing...i have had read my articles and seen thousand of videos and the same issue.. My spinning rods are all med action, they should not be bending like that..

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        • #5
          Specifically what spinning rod and what spinning reel are you using? What type and weight of line? I’ve used spinning outfits for everything from trout to king salmon and striped bass, never had the rod bend too much. If the rod is bending so much with 3/8 to 1/2 oz lures (no fish on) then the rod is too light. I can retrieve a 3/8 oz lure on a light weight trout rod and not experience what you described.

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          • #6
            Cant help with you without watching your technique, but I have to question the use of a bait caster, particularly a 7’ rod, to throw such light baits.

            In that weight range, I use a Penn Slammer 360 on a “Concept” built, North Forks composites, 78” blank (MB665-1), using # 10 Sufix Performance braid.

            https://northforkcomposites.com/

            Over runs are the result of the spool running at a higher speed than the bait in flight. Most are technique problems, a jerk or snap type release or failure to follow through on the cast.

            It all starts with the back swing. I can call a “professional over run” before the weight leaves the end of rod
            ....

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            • #7
              I reread your post and here’s my modified response. I’ve been an avid fisherman for 60 + years and consider myself expert in many areas of fishing. Here’s a few thoughts. First the bait caster back lash problem. You are getting back lashes because the tension and brake are not properly adjusted and you aren’t using your thumb properly. If the tension and brake are too tight then you can’t cast very far. If they are too loose then you get back lashes. Start by tightening them up till no back lashes when casting. Slowly loosen them until you start to get a backlash, then tighten a little and try casting. Next you need to use your thumb to slow down the reel just before the lure hits the water. Also use monofilament line as braid and fluro will backlash more easily than mono. Finally I suggest you spend a day fishing with a good bass fishing guide. He will quickly spot what’s wrong and hopefully get you casting like a pro.
              Regarding your problems with the spinning gear what you describe is too light a rod and reel for what you are doing. Still need to know specifically what rod and reel you are using. If you are having problems reeling in just a lure then a fish on the line must be impossible.

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              • #8
                I just watched three videos on how to set up a casting reel. Goes against everything I know about tuning casting reels and proper casting technique.

                I’m swap out stock bearings for ceramics to reduce spool friction. Some of the guys in the videos are telling people to tighten down on the centering adjustment to control speed......wth?

                Spool should be centered (if adjustable) with roughly 0.003” of end play. Spool speed is adjusted using brake blocks, mag adjustment (if equipped) and or weight of oil used in bearings.

                On a different video, the guys technique was horrible. Either doesn't know how or can’t load the rod to save his life. Cranked the “tension” down trying to compensate for his “stop and jerk” back swing motion.

                I’ve taught a number of people how to cast using equipment setup for tournament casting. It all starts with proper rod technique. Practice, practice, practice. Then more practice.

                When you think your good....try casting while blind folded. Better yet, fish a night session in a tournament on a moonless night.
                ....

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                • #9
                  FWIW, for the weight of lures you're throwing, I prefer a spinning reel. I have use bait casters for that size of lure, but spinners seem better suited for light lures, IMHO. Though, most of my fishing in the last 10 years has been with baitcasters and conventional reels, heavier lures...

                  Originally posted by dingbat View Post
                  Spool should be centered (if adjustable) with roughly 0.003” of end play. Spool speed is adjusted using brake blocks, mag adjustment (if equipped) and or weight of oil used in bearings.
                  Bingo! Read the docs for your reel to see if it has centrifugal brakes or mag braking.

                  If centrifugal braking, you'll have to open the reel and click the brakes "on", or add plastic brake sleeves. Since you're having overrun problems, enable all the brakes, then you can click them off as you get proficient. Mag braking should have an external adjustment, set it to max, then back it off as you get proficient.

                  Not sure how others cast, but I have my thumb hovering over the spool, with spool of line ever so lightly ticking my thumb during the cast, not so much during the initial release, but probably the last 1/2 to 2/3 of the cast. Larger reels, I'll lean my thumb over onto the spool's side. Then again, I run my reels pretty darn lose, so I'm controlling the overruns manually...

                  Tip: it's easiest to pick a backlash out of the back side of the reel... Don't try to pull through the levelwind, pull/pick from the back side of the spool.
                  2001 Crestliner SuperHawk 1800, Mercruiser 140HP
                  2007 Tracker 1436 jon boat, 7.5HP Force

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                  • #10
                    Doubt I'll try one again, the last time I used one was 40 some years ago. I use open face reels and there is no issue and even a no-nothing guy like me won't mess them up.
                    94 Formula 27PC Custom 509MPI MEFI3 , B3 XR
                    95 Rinker 232 w/ 7.4L Carb 0F425011 B1 0F486471
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                    G-Dad always said "First Liar doesn't stand a chance"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AllDodge View Post
                      Doubt I'll try one again, the last time I used one was 40 some years ago. I use open face reels and there is no issue and even a no-nothing guy like me won't mess them up.
                      In reality, bait casting setups are not the best tool for most applications.

                      They do two things very well, they hold a lot of line and are more efficient at casting and retrieving larger payloads. If you don't need either attribute, I see no reason to use one.

                      Had I not gotten so heavily into Surf and Jetty fishing, I probably wouldn't use one at all.
                      ....

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                      • #12
                        But I do like the drag system on the casting reels so much better the spinning reels. But that is just me if I have a big one on.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MRS View Post
                          But I do like the drag system on the casting reels so much better the spinning reels. But that is just me if I have a big one on.
                          I agree to an extent that conventional reels can have better drags than spinners although the gap narrows significantly, or disappears altogether when comparing reels of equal quality and price.

                          A number of spinning reels now being offered have higher drag capacities than their casting counter parts
                          ....

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                          • #14


                            They do two things very well, they hold a lot of line and are more efficient at casting and retrieving larger payloads. If you don't need either attribute, I see no reason to use one.

                            That is exactly why I love them when fishing heavy lures or deep bait they have there place at least for me but that is what I like to fish with. Just saying to each he's or her own not arguing I just grow up fishing them and very comfortable with them.
                            To each there own.

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                            • #15
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                              I just came across this thread. I tried my baitcaster for over 30 years and I think I spent 29 of those years picking "carbuncklements" out of my reel. That word was coined by a very good fisherman I worked with early in my Blast Furnace years with, Oswaldo Giacomelli RIP Ozzy. 5 years ago for my 60th my wonderful lady bought me a day fishing for Musky on Lake Nippising in central Ontario Canada with a fantastic guide. I had caught a total of 1 Tiger Musky in 40 years of fishing. My guide handed me a baitcaster and I said to myself this isn't going to turn out well. It was a Shimano Stratos if I can remember 5 years ago. I casted that thing for hours and had exactly ZERO carbuncklements to my amazement and did not get arm weary. I told him of the struggles I have had for the previous 30 years using the Shimano I had.No one would let me try thiers as they knew I was going to waste a spool of line of thiers. Dany explained the reason I was having problems. It was the $300.00 that would have saved me all those disappointments for the last 3 decades. That was the difference in price for the old Shimano Bantam I was given as a gift and the new rather expensive Shimano I had in my hand.

                              If you want to be successful tossing a baitcaster you need to spend the $$$ and get the best that is sold. It is as simple as that. You get what you pay for. Dany Columbo is a guide that fishes for Muskellunge primarily on what's called "The West Arm" of Lake Nipissing. I highly recommend him. I caught 5 Musky that day under the tutelage of Dany. 1 was 44", that's a nice Musky.
                              Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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