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Rotting transom

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  • Rotting transom

    Does anyone have experience in rebuilding the transom? I can see the transom is pulling away and the screws have come out from the rotted wood.

    I'd like to rebuild it - and was told it's a matter of getting the old wood out, laminating a new piece of wood to shape, and sliding it in.

    Does it get more complicated than this? Any help would be great, thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Rotting transom

    I just did mine about 2 months ago. Post a picture of both the inside and outside of your transom. If your trim pieces are all in good shape then it makes it easier to rebuild. The basics are as you stated. Remove all screws/bolts/rivets from inside and outside of the transom. Remove the old wood, hopefully you will have enough to use as a template. Laminate two pieces of 3/4 exterior ply together with epoxy. Cut wood to shape and apply two coats of epoxy. Slide new wood into transom and re-attach top cap. Drill all screw holes and fill with either epoxy or 3M 5200. Attach screws/bolts etc. Done.
    Geeco
    1988 Blue Fin Sportsman 1700
    1988 Force 85 hp
    Restoration Thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=383916

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    • #3
      Re: Rotting transom





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      • #4
        Re: Rotting transom

        Here's the pics of the transom. I'm about the take the motor off but do I need to keep it upright?
        I don't many rivets its mostly screws.

        What was the final cost of your transom repair? I'm thinking of using Seacast as it seems it would save me a lot of time and effort.

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        • #5
          Re: Rotting transom

          My transom repair probably cost me in the neighborhood of $150. About $30 for the plywood, $50 for the epoxy, $25 for the aluminum for new top cap, $30 for new aluminum skin inside, a few bucks for misc screws, 3M 5200, etc. If you can salvage your top cap (mine was cracked) and you don't have to replace any other aluminum, then you can get by for around $100.

          I don't think that Seacast is used much in tinnys... more for fiberglass. But you are sure free to ask around. Go to the Restoration Forum on this site and do a search.
          Geeco
          1988 Blue Fin Sportsman 1700
          1988 Force 85 hp
          Restoration Thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=383916

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          • #6
            Re: Rotting transom

            I called the company and looked through the restoration forums - and Seacast seems to work great for aluminum boats. Also people who have used it seem to love it. And the nice thing is the transom lasts longer than the aluminum.

            Why did you need aluminum skins? And about how long did it take you to do the job?

            My top cap is good, I'm worried about getting the wood out.

            Seacasts recommends using a chain saw and says the wood comes out no probs.

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            • #7
              Re: Rotting transom

              I had to replace my inner skin because the previous owner tried to weld the splash well to the inside of the boat. It was done so poorly that by the time I ground out all of the welds, the skin was distorted and full of holes.

              It took me about 1 month but that included removing the skin and grinding welds, cleaning up the splashwell, making a new top cap, etc. Keep in mind that I was only working on it in my spare time. If you don't have to do all of that, then your time should be shorter. I have heard that some complete it in a long weekend.

              Other things that take time.... build engine stand, remove engine, paint, etc. If you have the proper tools, then that helps too. I didn't have an engine hoist, so I had to devise something haning from my attic scuttle hole in my garage, etc.

              I have heard the chainsaw tecnique also. Just make sure you don't cut too deep.
              Geeco
              1988 Blue Fin Sportsman 1700
              1988 Force 85 hp
              Restoration Thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=383916

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Rotting transom

                I have a 19' Bluefin that I have been restoring. I repaced the decking, built new consoles, new windshield and now about to put in the new transom. Nida Bond is a lot less expensive then Seacast, but from what I have heard is that shipping is expensive as it is considered hazardest waste. I decided to go with marine plywood and expoxy as shipping from Florida to Washington State make it very expensive.
                Here is a link to my restoration of my Bluefin.
                http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=376040
                1991 Starcraft
                Take Risk Not To Escape Life, But To Prevent Life From Escaping.

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                • #9
                  Sign up today
                  Re: Rotting transom

                  no Seacast is not considered a haz-mat and shipping is not that bad try getting anthing shipped these days. nida bond uses ceramic in its formula while seacast has fiberglass. There were some talk in the past about customer support but there is a new crew there now. Ms. Unger took over for her father and the time they spent with me was great. i hope your repair goes well but give the crew at Seacast a call on the shipping. You will never have to worry about that transom again

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