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14' "TomBoy" restore

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  • 14' "TomBoy" restore

    2 weeks ago I bought this 14' TomBoy fishing boat for $400. Of course when I got it home I discovered that under the little cracked area in the deck was rotten wood, saturated foam and about 40 gallons of water. My 1st thought was to take it to the dump but after finding iboats I decided to tackle the project. I have built a plywood canoe before with fiberglass and Raka epoxy so I think that experience should help me some. I will attach pics of the 'TomBoy'. I don't know much about the boat other than it may have been built in Huntsville, Alabama in the 60s & 70s. The owner told me the outboard is a "1956" Evinrude (15hp). So far I have ripped out most of the deck, all of the foam and vacuumed/drained out all the water. This weekend I am going to attempt to:
    1. Remove the rest of the floor and stringers
    2. Remove the transom from the inside
    3. Grind & Sand
    4. I also have an oops in the hull where the circular saw cut it. Don't know if I will get to it this weekend though.
    Last edited by Trapper55; July 30th, 2009, 11:47 AM. Reason: Add Pictures


  • #2
    Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

    Questions??
    1. Polyester resin is a lot cheaper than Epoxy. Is the coverage the same as Epoxy or do you have to use more of it? Should I buy 5 gallons of Polyester or would 2 gallons of Epoxy suffice?

    2. Foam: I have seen some projects where construction foam is used instead of the expensive pour and mix foam. Does the construction foam have the same floatation properties? Density?

    Comment



    • #3
      Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

      Check this thread out, should have everything you want to know about Epoxy or Poly

      http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=286013

      Comment



      • #4
        Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

        Here are some better pictures.

        [IMG][/IMG]

        [IMG][/IMG]

        [IMG][/IMG]

        [IMG][/IMG]

        Comment



        • #5
          Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

          Last Weekend's Progress. Removed seats, seat pedestals, live well, fire extinguisher & most of the deck. Still haven't decided about the casting deck upfront. Depends on what kinda shape the stringers are in when I start working on them.

          [IMG][/IMG]

          Friday's 7/31: Worked on the transom

          [IMG][/IMG]

          Removed the transom end cap by drilling out the rivets.

          [IMG][/IMG]

          It took all day to get the transom out. Used circular saw, reciprocating saw, hammer and chisel, pry bar and 4 1/2" grinder.

          [IMG][/IMG]

          Anyone have ideas on how to get the last couple of inches of deck out on the hull sides? I was going to put the new deck on top but I don't think the wood is in as good of shape as I thought. I need to able to cut as close as I can to the side so I can avoid spending 2 days grinding.
          Last edited by Trapper55; August 1st, 2009, 07:04 PM. Reason: Added more text

          Comment



          • #6
            Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

            To get the last couple inches of floor: I would use the sawzall with a long blade, put several wraps of duct tape on the end of the blade so it won't cut and just flex it up against the hull while trimming it will offer a lot of control,conversely, you could use a air powered die grinder( or electric dremel type tool) with a cut off wheel and trim it. My first option would be the sawzall tho'. In the same train of thought; you could just trim one side and pop the floor in from just one side if ya wanted to . I would use polyester, it is cheaper and epoxy is really for more exotic stuff. ( unless you just want to try it ) Good job so far. Advice: buy only fresh materials, csm over one year will give you trouble ( the glues that binds the fibers together does not want to dissolve from the styrene in the polyester resin), resin over 6 months old can be difficult to work , mekp over 6 months may not activate. another reason to use poly is csm is cheap and cannot be used with epoxy. ( epoxy does not have the styrene that dissolves the binder glue) Have you looked at us composites.com for your materials? they even have the 2 part foam
            my thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread....ighlight=terry

            Comment



            • #7
              Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

              Thanks for the input. I think I'm going to try your sawzall idea 1st. I might use it on the stringers too. I found a local boat repair shop that will sell me 5 gallons of polyester Marpro pretty cheap ($137) but I'm not sure of the brand name. They also will also sell me CSM. It's what they use and they have to order it so I guess it would be fresh. At least I can save on shipping if I find a local source. They don't have the 2 part foam so I will be checking at the US Composites site you mentioned.

              Comment



              • #8
                Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                Have you asked them if the resin is waxed or unwaxed ? this is important. check out us comp's resin too. -no relation> blah-blah-blah..
                my thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread....ighlight=terry

                Comment



                • #9
                  Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                  I'm behind on pics but I have made some progress. I think hell is grinding on fiberglass in a tyvek suit when it is 90 deg in the shade. Stringers are out. I bought 3/4" marine grade plywood for the transom and the deck. I know it is expensive but the transom is 3/4" and I had to buy a whole sheet so I decided to use it on the deck also and buy a 2nd sheet. The deck was originally only 1/2". I didn't like the idea of voids in the layers and I thought it would be stronger. I am going to use 1708 Biaxial mat from US Composites. The Biaxial is a combo of woven roving and CSM. I am thinking I can:
                  1. coat all of the wood with 1 coat of resin
                  2. add a layer of Biaxial with more resin.
                  3. and then use the 12" wide roll of biaxial for the stringers and where the deck and hull meet. Also at the transom

                  I don't care if the deck is perfectly smooth. I am going to paint it with a non skid paint. Does anyone have any comments on using biaxial instead of CSM and roving?

                  US Composites Order List
                  435 standard Polyester Resin: 5 gal $121
                  1708 Knytex Biaxial 17oz; 50" Wide: $8.50 yd
                  1708 25yd Roll Biaxial; 12" Wide: $55
                  Phenolic Microballons for gap filling.

                  Comment



                  • #10
                    Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                    The 1708 biaxial is actually csm and cloth sewn together-no woven roving in there. As far as working glass, the difficulty of working it should be a secondary factor as to what it is intended for Ie; is it needed for strength/structural concerns ? or basically cosmetic? . Biax is a little more difficult to work in than csm due to getting the material wetted out quickly enough ( a factor in hotter weather) but it does look nice and strong. A roller( not a paint roller) to remove trapped air is neccassary for the biax. Woven roving is more difficult to use than either biax or csm, Only in the sense that it does not fit into corners near as well ( if at all) . I would get some csm also as there will be places it is needed as well and can be utilized first for build up and then a layer of biax for strength. Csm is better for certain situations like build up/final layers on cosmetic repairs ( but use the biax for the backside of the repair) where the material will be sanded /shaped. Because the biax is sewn, it tends to show the threads when sanded down/shaped. I used only csm to build the area up on my keel that was no longer there( damaged and then had to grind past damage and previous repairs) and built up probally 40/50 layers of csm to rebuild those sections of keel. You will need a torch,oxy actylene or even a propane one will do fine to burn the resin off the roller tool in that seems to always somehow stay on despite your best efforts.
                    my thread http://forums.iboats.com/showthread....ighlight=terry

                    Comment



                    • #11
                      Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                      I installed the new transom, stringers & flotation foam. Working on fitting deck pieces. Transom has been fiberglassed with CSM and sanded to get ready for paint.

                      [/IMG]

                      [/IMG]

                      [/IMG]

                      [/IMG]

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                      • #12
                        Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                        Hey Trapper,
                        Do boats really need flotation foam? I ask this in somewhat of a rhetorical manner given the two projects I have been through that I have removed waterlogged foam saturated to various degrees. Maybe it is a component of where you boat (ocean, river or lake) to offer some type of protection if a boat is swamped. My two project Century inboard boats (1968 and 1995) both rotted from the inside out. Without this foam, I am sure the stringers and wood floor and structure would have naturally dried out and limited the rot. I pulled the foam out of the 68 and now the 95 (which the moisture was literally locked in by the carpet and soaked marine plywood) with no plans to do any new foam work on either. I see the amazing job you are doing and wonder if the new foam will start the rot process again once wet either by rain or wave.
                        Just a thought.

                        Steve B
                        Steve B
                        72 Slickcraft SS165
                        95 Century Resorter

                        Comment



                        • #13
                          Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                          I don't remember the exact spec but I know the coast guard requires flotation foam on boats up to a certain length (16 ft?). The foam I put in has 60 lbs of flotation per cubic ft. I used enough for 8 cubic feet so I have enough flotation for 480 lbs. Plus I added some pink foam board for extra. The dry weight of my boat is 400 lbs plus you have to add the weight of the out board etc. so my boat should float if it is swamped. If you can't add enough foam to keep your boat & equipment floating if it gets swamped then I probably wouldn't put it in. Keep your restored boat covered and maintained and you won't have to worry about rotten wood and saturated foam. Do a search on foam in the forum for lots of info and opinions.

                          Comment



                          • #14
                            Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                            I finished the project in March but I have been fishing a lot so I didn't post the final pictures. I enjoyed the project but I don't think I would do it again.
                            I have learned to "Never say Never Again".

                            Comment



                            • #15
                              Re: 14' "TomBoy" restore

                              Originally posted by Trapper55 View Post
                              I finished the project in March but I have been fishing a lot so I didn't post the final pictures. I enjoyed the project but I don't think I would do it again.
                              I have learned to "Never say Never Again".
                              Hmmmm, have you been listening to me mumble in my yard I know exactly how you feel. Restoration is allot of work and commitment.
                              This is a great link to boat specifications http://boatspecs.iboats.com/
                              Please, shop iboats first!!

                              Comment

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