winterizing question

rutherford75

Recruit
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Oct 31, 2021
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Hello this is my first year getting my 2015 Bayliner Bowrider ready for the winter. I watched some videos that show boat owners buying a fogging oil spray as part of the winterizing process. They seem to spray the fogging oil into the carb until the engine stalls. This seems a little strange to me since I want to keep my carburetor clean and not sure why a modern engine without poor leaky head gaskets would need to worry about cylinder walls rusting? With modern synthetic oils, why would cylinder walls need to be coated with a heavy oil to protect them. Another concern of mine, wouldn't this process eventually speed up the need to rebuild my carb due to oil fowling up the jets on the carb? As someone who works hard to keep the cylinder head and carbs clean of carbon, the fogging process really bothered me.

I love working on engines and have never done this process to a modern motor. I can understand the process for my old flat head Straight 8 that I own on my Packard but wouldn't fogging cause more harm than good?

I would love to hear comments on this. Also any other suggestion of preparing the motor for winter is appreciated. I plan on changing the engine oil and lower gear oil for the prop. Thank you.
 

Scott Danforth

Grumpy old guy who plays with boats
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Jul 23, 2011
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37,045
condensation doesnt need a motor, just a big old chunk of iron (or concrete, etc) and a temperature change

if you store your boat (or car or machinery, etc) in a 0% humidity environment, then you would get no condensation (internal and external) and it wont be a problem

however since we do not live in a 0% humidity environment, suggested fogging where ever you cold-store anything as condensation will form when ever the air temp rises faster than the object temp. that condensation will happen inside the crank case, inside the cylinder walls, outside the block, in your fuel tank, etc.

change oil
fog if you want or not
drain engine/manifolds/hoses (probe all plugs). if you have a v6, dont forget the thermostat housing drain
remove drive, check alignment, gimbal, u-joints and bellows
change gear lube
trailer maintenance
rodent/insect abatement methods of your choice
block up trailer (plug out of boat)
cover
 

alldodge

Supreme Mariner
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Mar 8, 2009
Messages
34,526
Fogging a carb motor wouldn't cause an issue with the carb because the oil goes down the throat and not inside. All the oil is inside the intake and block

Your motor (don't know which one) being a 2015 might be a MPI. If it is, then fogging is done differently. No oil should be sprayed inside the intake because it will coat the sensors. Need to mix up a small batch of 2 cycle oil and gas. Fill the gas filter or aux tank and run the motor on it
 

Lou C

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Nov 10, 2002
Messages
8,489
What you're trying to protect is the upper engine area, the cyl heads and valves. These will not have a coating of oil and when damp air migrates in and the cast iron cools off the moisture will condense on them and cause corrosion. The cyl walls have some coating of oil but it helps them too. If I open up the engine hatch of my boat after the temp drops at night, the engine may be covered with condensation. The same thing happens inside and it sits for months unlike most cars. Now if you can store it inside in a dehumidified environment its not such a big deal. Outside, damp environment like I have to, for sure fogging is a good idea.
But make sure you actually have a carb, if you have throttle body or MPI you have to do it differently as described above.
 

Lou C

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Nov 10, 2002
Messages
8,489
Just did mine yesterday, changed oil & filter, fogged with 2 cans of fogging oil spraying at the same time to stall it, drained everything manually and back filled with Sierra PG antifreeze…
 

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racerone

Supreme Mariner
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Fogging oil just goes inside the motor.----Does not cause problems with carburetion at all.
 

saaristo

Petty Officer 2nd Class
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Sep 22, 2017
Messages
131
If in doubt pull the plugs and fog the cylinders that way.
Just to be sure, I did mine the same way - sprayed a bit of oil into cylinders and turned the engine by hand. Now that was hard and I'm not sure if I managed to get even one full round. Would have been much easier and better result if done with starter. But I read from somewhere that if you do that while plugs removed from cylinders and harness you could damage electrcal system, is that true?
 

Lou C

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Depending on which ignition system you have that could be true. If you want to do it that way you can ground the high tension lead from the coil to an engine ground to prevent damage (on my old points system). I’d advise following the manufacturers procedure for doing a compression test with respect to disabling the ignition system.
having said that the point of fogging is to coat the upper area of the engine with fogging oil so doing it as I do (carbed engine only) by using 2 cans at the same time and stalling the engine is better. EFI engines require the pre mix cocktail fir fogging.
 

saaristo

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Sep 22, 2017
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Depending on which ignition system you have that could be true. If you want to do it that way you can ground the high tension lead from the coil to an engine ground to prevent damage (on my old points system). I’d advise following the manufacturers procedure for doing a compression test with respect to disabling the ignition system.
having said that the point of fogging is to coat the upper area of the engine with fogging oil so doing it as I do (carbed engine only) by using 2 cans at the same time and stalling the engine is better. EFI engines require the pre mix cocktail fir fogging.
Thanks for input. Regarding manufacturer procedure it says only to drain the water from seawater side (its a half closed system) and you're good to go. Nothing about fogging or mixing fuels. What I've done myself is mixed a 50:1 fuel with 2T oil, filled fuel filter with that and external tank and run for 5 mins. And then sprayed a bit of fogging oil into cylinders and maybe managed to turn it for one round (I hope). Is that enough...I don't know. Some are saying the fuel mix should be 20:1 some say 10:1, mine was only 50:1. It's a 2008 4.3 gxi-jf VP.
 

tpenfield

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Keep in mind that you can read just about anything on the Internet. . . much of it is just a mashing of opinions.

Your engine service manual should be your guide.
 

saaristo

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Keep in mind that you can read just about anything on the Internet. . . much of it is just a mashing of opinions.

Your engine service manual should be your guide.
Thats true. However, considering the official numbers here say that we have an average of 200, yes thats 200 freeze-melt cycles per year I'm thinking just draining isn't going to cut it. So you het the idea about condensation and all in this kind of weather.
 

Lou C

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I'm surprised that Volvo didn't have a procedure for fogging EFI engines, is this their manual or aftermarket?
If I were doing it in that situation I might just follow Mercruiser's procedure which is to use a 6 gallon outboard tank, fill with 5 gallons of fuel, 2 qts of TCW-2 two stroke oil and an appropriate amount of stabilizer. Run the engine on this mix (make sure to not let it run out of gas) then drain manually and back fill with -100.
I've always back filled with either -100 or a 50/50 mix of Sierra PG antifreeze. I got an antifreeze refractormeter to make up accurate mixed jugs of Sierra, it is a lot cheaper than the -100, and much better than the cheap -50 or -60 stuff.IMG_3316.jpg
 

ejnichol

Seaman
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May 28, 2002
Messages
67
The Volvo Penta owners manual with my 2007 5.0 GXI says nothing about winterizing. More about standard care ie when to do what oil change etcc. I think have to get a shop manual etcc. Otherwise these guys have good recomendation.

You can remove your gas filter, empty and add same volume of 2 stroke and gas. Run engine for 5 - 15 seconds and that should coat cylinder wall and lube fuel pump if its hp electric.

I sprayed fogging oil into metal air filter but that probably wasn't too effective. Should have removed assembly prior.
 

Lou C

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There you have it!
If the boat is stored in a dry area indoors it may not be so critical to fog it but if it’s stored outside in a damp climate all winter as it is here fogging is recommended
 

saaristo

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Sep 22, 2017
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Interesting, my manual from 2008 doesn't say a word about this. Maybe there are regional differences between the books, who knows.
And, if we really are talking about condensation and not "relatve air humidity" then 50:1 mix really isn't going to protect anything...or will it? I did it myself, who knows why, but it sure doesnt look much of a protection if you stick your finger into this mix and rub your fingers...no oiliness whatsoever.
 
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