1981 Citation Marquis restoration...

Luposian

Petty Officer 2nd Class
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
103
When I de-capped mine, it seemed like the hull bowed outward coming from near where the floor attaches (at the chines). I did not build a cradle or do internal bracing - just crossed my fingers and restored the hull on my bunk trailer. I did take width measurements every foot immediately after decapping and when I was glassing in stringers, bulkheads, and the floor, I would use 1-2 ratchet straps to bring the boat back into shape before starting the glassing...even over-tightening the ratchet straps to make the hull about 1/2" narrower than the original dimension to counteract any spring-back. The most splay I ever saw was a little over 1 inch, I think. After glassing in the floor and letting it cure, I removed the ratchet straps and the hull held it's shape and was within 1/8" of where it started at each width measurement.

All that to say, I would listen to the other members and not worry so much about placement of the bracing...just make sure you brace the hull somehow, and you'll likely be fine.
Thanks. That gives me the confidence I need to proceed. With the braces screwed in from the outside, the hull won't be able to bow out (screws holding it against the wood) or flex in (the wood pushing against the hull). That was the intended outcome. I just needed enough reassurance it was truly good enough to work as intended.
 

Luposian

Petty Officer 2nd Class
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
103
I've started removing the rubtrail aluminum track before I've installed the interior bracing. Any idea why? I was looking under the gunwale and suddenly noticed a lot more rivets poking through, than there were rivets on the rubrail track... the rubrail isn't holding the cap to the hull! There are rivets under the rub rail track holding the cap to the hull! I've finished removing the two transom quarter pieces. Now drilling out the area where the rivets were and discovering some don't go all the way through the cap and hull lip... or I can't seem to drill all the way through. And the rivets seems to be placed all over the place (even very close to the cap edge, like they were used to just tack on the cap). Can't make much sense of this boat's design/assembly. Very crude in places. Maybe that's why the company (Citation Boats) is no longer in business, while others are? Ugh! I've made a bit of a mess with some holes, but I'm filling them in with Marine Tex epoxy (or similar) anyway, later on, so not a big deal.
 

Baylinerchuck

Commander
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
2,616
Yep, welcome to boat repair. Most boats are put together this way, regardless of the brand.
 

buxmj

Petty Officer 1st Class
Joined
Jun 9, 2018
Messages
258
I haven't put my rubrail back on yet to tell you how many rivets connect it to the boat but I can tell you there are 100 rivets between the cap and the hull on my 14' boat. Also, the hull rivets are smaller than the rubrail rivets. The rubrail rivets pass through rubrail, cap and hull.
 

Luposian

Petty Officer 2nd Class
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
103
I wanna know who the (!!!) did the cutting on this boat cap! I assume the cap is supposed to be even with that hull lip (see the thin glossy white line below the cap?). But the cut is so uneven, like it was done with a lousy jigsaw or something! This is one of about three of the worst sections. Ugh! I'm debating on patching the cap lip, so it's even. Or am I being too much of a perfectionist about it? Also, I'm not worried about any rivet holes being drilled out over size. They're all getting filled in anyways. The crazing (spider cracks) on the cap is ridiculous. No way to fix it. They're everywhere. I figure the most obvious ones can be rattle canned. The lost gelcoat (chips and pieces) can be filled in with a little epoxy and spray painted over. At the end of the day, "good enough" really will have to be good enough! :)
 

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Luposian

Petty Officer 2nd Class
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
103
Well, got rid of all the cap rivets that had a little aluminum "pin" in them (which filled the little hole in the rivet). Made HUGE holes, to remove those buggers, having to go in at weird angles to get them drilled out. Those pins are impossible to get out, aren't they? My drill bit kept sliding off center while trying to get those rivets out What are those pins for anyways?

Then started cleaning out the space between the cap and hull with my wide metal spreader, removing dirt and silicone sealant. Had a couple places I had to hammer the blade against some remaining pieces of drilled out rivets. Fun! FUN! F U N !!! No, seriously! I'm loving every minute I work on my boat. Even being annoyed like crazy by things like aluminum rivet pins and remaining bits of aluminum rivets is fun. Because I'm getting closer and closer, step by step, to the next goal... which is cap removal!

Hose blasted the space between the cap/hull, to clean out any remaining dirt and loose detritus. So, now we can get back to measuring the hull for three more 2x2 braces! Yay!

Thankfully, I have the rubrail insert all in one piece. So no need to try and measure 5 individual pieces of aluminum rub rail track and add them up! :)

BTW, any suggestions as to what brand/kind of rub rail I should go with, when I come back to that point in this reconstruction? This was just a 5-piece aluminum rub rail track with a rusty brown-colored insert. So very 80's. :) It's about 1.25" wide and I don't think depth (how far it sticks out from the boat) really matters, but I think it was around 1" or so (track+insert).
 

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todhunter

Canoeist
Joined
Sep 15, 2020
Messages
1,030
The "pin" in a blind aluminum rivet is the steel core used to mushroom out the back side of the rivet when you pull it to set it. The reason the drill bit walks off is because it's a steel pin inside of a soft aluminum rivet. Usually I take a small drift punch and a hammer and knock the pins out before drilling.

I'd probably look at Taco Marine for rub rail - they have a pretty extensive selection.
 

Luposian

Petty Officer 2nd Class
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
103
The "pin" in a blind aluminum rivet is the steel core used to mushroom out the back side of the rivet when you pull it to set it. The reason the drill bit walks off is because it's a steel pin inside of a soft aluminum rivet. Usually I take a small drift punch and a hammer and knock the pins out before drilling.

I'd probably look at Taco Marine for rub rail - they have a pretty extensive selection.
Ok, thanks for clarifying that to me. That pin looked the same color as the aluminum rivet, so I assumed it was aluminum as well, and figured maybe it was harder aluminum than the rest or something. Yeah, if I knew what to use on those "pinned" rivets, I'd have done so, but I made do with what I could and got them out regardless... and will just fill in the holes with epoxy of one type or another, later on.

Yeah, kinda figured Taco Marine would be a go-to answer on Rub Rails (done enough research to see that they pop up alot on searches). How closely should I match the dimensions of the original aluminum rail track? That little L-shaped "lip" on the bottom, goes under the edge of the cap, but is that ever longer in some cases than others or is it a pretty standardized length, old or new, regardless of material used?
 
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