Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tire pressure

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tire pressure

    Hi all,

    My trailer tires state the following.

    Maximum load 1045LB at 80PSI. My setup is approx 900LB and when I checked the tire pressure it is at 45psi. I feel like if I go to 80PSI that the tires might blow.

    Should I go up from 45 to 80?

    Thanks
    Zipp

  • #2
    Re: Tire pressure

    First, nice musky! If your tires are rated for 80# they will not blow if you max them out. Considering your approaching max load with 900#s, I would put 80#s in the tires......

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Tire pressure

      Ayuh,.... The safest tire pressure is the pressure stated on their sidewalls,....

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Tire pressure

        +1^^
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Tire pressure

          Trailer tires use air pressure for sidewall strength and rigidity.
          If you run low air pressure, you risk a blowout if you hit something, like railroad tracks or a curb.
          Low air pressure also causes the tires to run hot, and can cause premature failure.

          Per TireRack: The stiffer sidewalls and higher operating pressures common with Special Trailer (ST) designated tires help reduce trailer sway.


          From Carlisle Tire:
          Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure. Low
          inflation pressure elevates tread temperature, especially as speed
          increases. Operation of a
          trailer tire that is 30 percent under-inflated can reduce tire lifespan by
          approximately 55%. An underinflated tire creates abnormal tire
          flexing and excessive heat causing the following:
          – Tire damage and failure.
          – Ride and handling disturbance.
          – Reduction of tire life.
          – Decreased fuel efficiency by as much as 10 percent.
          – Maintain air pressure at the maximum PSI recommended on the
          tire sidewall.
          – Check tire pressure when tires are cold and in the shade.
          Medford, WI


          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Tire pressure

            Yes, inflate them to 80# for safety and tire longevity. Note that the weight capacity is per tire, so the set will be good for up to 2090 pounds. Don't worry too much about the increased pressure transmitting impacts to the boat: reducing that is why you have springs on the trailer.
            Bob, Seneca Lake NY
            '88 Bayliner 1700 Capri bowrider, 85 HP Force O/B, "Sea Weasel"
            '94 Grumman Fish'N Fun pontoon, 40 HP Merc
            Want a vessel safety check? Click here. Want to join the Coast Guard Auxiliary? Click here.
            Disclaimer: Although I am a member of the USCG Auxiliary, the opinions and advice in my replies are my own and do not necessarily reflect CG or CG Auxiliary policy or regulations unless so specified.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Tire pressure

              Originally posted by zippy83 View Post
              Hi all,

              My trailer tires state the following.

              Maximum load 1045LB at 80PSI. My setup is approx 900LB and when I checked the tire pressure it is at 45psi. I feel like if I go to 80PSI that the tires might blow.

              Should I go up from 45 to 80?

              Thanks
              Zipp
              Some thing dose not sound right, a 1045 pound load range is a load range C rating and that is normally around a 45 to 50 psi air pressure. a 80 to 90 psi tire is a E load range. Mine are E rated at 90 psi at 1650 pounds. I would take a real close look at the side wall ratings. 80 psi in a C rated tire can blow up in your face.
              Last edited by MH Hawker; March 21st, 2014, 04:58 PM.
              Bad Dog

              If it aint broke your not having enough fun

              my 1988 Riviera Cruzer pontoon rebuild
              https://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=526820

              my pontoon trailer rebuild

              https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...railer-rebuild

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Tire pressure

                I got it now at 70psi. The spare reads max load 845lb at 60psi

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Tire pressure

                  Originally posted by MH Hawker View Post
                  Some thing dose not sound right, a 1045 pound load range is a load range C rating and that is normally around a 45 to 50 psi air pressure. a 80 to 90 psi tire is a E load range. Mine are E rated at 90 psi at 1650 pounds. I would take a real close look at the side wall ratings. 80 psi in a C rated tire can blow up in your face.
                  I have 8" and 12" load range C tires and they are 90psi.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Tire pressure

                    If a tire isn't meant for 80 psi, they wouldn't mention it on the sidewall. He didn't state tire size or brand. The tire manufacturer determines the pressure they need to be run at.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Tire pressure

                      Originally posted by zippy83 View Post
                      I got it now at 70psi. The spare reads max load 845lb at 60psi
                      Run them at max pressure. They will gain some psi anyway during use. I can't see any reason to run trailer tires at anything but the max pressure.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Tire pressure

                        Originally posted by bassman284 View Post
                        If a tire isn't meant for 80 psi, they wouldn't mention it on the sidewall. He didn't state tire size or brand. The tire manufacturer determines the pressure they need to be run at.
                        Pressures are universal based on the load range. The print is real small and the chinacrap tires aren't all that readable at times. Use a mag glass and look again. Then load it to the rated psi.

                        Obviously, the spare is a lesser grade tire. Better be sure it'll handle the load.
                        2019 SeaRay SPX 190 OB & Mercury 150 4-Stroke & Merc 5.0 Kicker
                        2017 Boston Whaler 150 Montauk & Mercury 60 ELPT Command Thrust & Merc 3.5 Kicker
                        2015 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO
                        1964 Sea Nymph 14R & 1970 Evinrude Sportwin 9.5
                        1960 Mulray 100 Dinghy, equipped with Beaver Oars
                        1952 Lyman 15' Mid Steer & Evinrude Big Twin 25
                        69 Outboards: 1919-2019, representing 11 manufacturers
                        -------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Member ACBS, LBOA, AOMCI

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Tire pressure

                          Originally posted by JimS123 View Post
                          Obviously, the spare is a lesser grade tire. Better be sure it'll handle the load.
                          He said the whole shebang weighs around 900 pounds, so the spare is fine.
                          Bob, Seneca Lake NY
                          '88 Bayliner 1700 Capri bowrider, 85 HP Force O/B, "Sea Weasel"
                          '94 Grumman Fish'N Fun pontoon, 40 HP Merc
                          Want a vessel safety check? Click here. Want to join the Coast Guard Auxiliary? Click here.
                          Disclaimer: Although I am a member of the USCG Auxiliary, the opinions and advice in my replies are my own and do not necessarily reflect CG or CG Auxiliary policy or regulations unless so specified.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Tire pressure

                            So two things... First, keep in mind rims have a max pressure also. You do NOT want to exceed that, unless you enjoy metal shrapnel... I've seen rims with max psi less than 80 psi...

                            Second, the OP is less than half the max load. I know people often disagree with this, but give me a second... Imagine your tire at max load, max psi. The angle of sidewall and size of footprint is what the tire is designed for. You want those two variables to be the same, no matter what the load. The only variable you control is the psi in the tire. Running max psi when a tire is loaded to less than half of capacity puts the tire way outside of its design spec. Your footprint on the ground is miniscule, you will wear the center of the tire extremely quickly and the available traction is greatly reduced. (assuming bias ply, radials are actually much more tolerant of higher psi when compared to load.)

                            So i'm curious, why do vehicle manufacturers never, EVER recommend max tire psi on the doorpost placard? Because your ride would suck, tire lifetime would be greatly reduced, and you would not have nearly as much control. But yet for some reason people think it is ok with trailer tires that are at half their max load.
                            Last edited by smokingcrater; March 21st, 2014, 08:23 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              Re: Tire pressure

                              Originally posted by smokingcrater View Post
                              Second, the OP is less than half the max load. I know people often disagree with this, but give me a second... Imagine your tire at max load, max psi. The angle of sidewall and size of footprint is what the tire is designed for. You want those two variables to be the same, no matter what the load. The only variable you control is the psi in the tire. Running max psi when a tire is loaded to less than half of capacity puts the tire way outside of its design spec. Your footprint on the ground is miniscule, you will wear the center of the tire extremely quickly and the available traction is greatly reduced. (assuming bias ply, radials are actually much more tolerant of higher psi when compared to load.)
                              Your theory sounds right, but the problem is figuring out what pressure to use. Is the relationship linear (i.e. half pressure for half load)?
                              Bob, Seneca Lake NY
                              '88 Bayliner 1700 Capri bowrider, 85 HP Force O/B, "Sea Weasel"
                              '94 Grumman Fish'N Fun pontoon, 40 HP Merc
                              Want a vessel safety check? Click here. Want to join the Coast Guard Auxiliary? Click here.
                              Disclaimer: Although I am a member of the USCG Auxiliary, the opinions and advice in my replies are my own and do not necessarily reflect CG or CG Auxiliary policy or regulations unless so specified.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X