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When to use Bilge Blower/When Not to use Bilge Blower

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  • #16
    Am repowering boat , looking for the correct way bilge blower hoses are to be installed , mine are badly torn and just laying in the both sides of the engine in the bilge

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    • #17
      min. 24 inches apart and just above water getting into them in bilge area lowest part
      project: https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...r-2159-hardtop
      Previous project https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...rint-bass-boat
      Previous previous project/conversion https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...rsion-splashed

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Lou C View Post
        I have the simplest Xintex one that does not turn the blower. I did test the sensor with an open gas can and it takes a surprisingly high level of fumes to alarm it. The sensor had to be nearly in the neck of the open can to set it off. That’s why I said earlier your nose will detect far below the level that would cause an explosion.
        is exactly right , i used a sniffer on my boat to check for any leaks around the fittings and tank sadly sniffer went nuts next to poly tank on hi sensitivity lol but fittings were fine and i can still detect a faint gas od0r when its been shut for awhile so i installed a solar fan to keep that gone.
        project: https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...r-2159-hardtop
        Previous project https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...rint-bass-boat
        Previous previous project/conversion https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...rsion-splashed

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        • #19
          I get to the staging area and I turn it on, I then only turn it off after 5 minutes of running on plane. If I am putting along I will turn it on since you can't hear it over the engine.
          2018 Glastron GT 185 | Mercury 4.5L 200HP
          1977 Crestliner Crusader 550 | 1977 Mercury 850 [SOLD to my father]
          1962 Scott unknown model | 1977 Mercury 50 HP [SOLD]

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          • #20
            Definitely learning a lot from this thread alone. Thank you very much!

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            • #21
              Oh god help me...I’m going to be controversial here. I’ve an MPI and a large sun pad full width engine bay. I never use my blower.
              If I had a carb and especially on a boat with the small compact engine hatch with jump seats at both sides...I’d certainly just leave it on all the time. I’ve personally seen a bayliner 175 with this set up explode and also years earlier a fletcher too. Both had a carb 3.0 and the literally engine sized right box section surround hatch.

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              • #22
                "I never use my blower."

                Can you post your full name, address, next of kin phone ,contact number , personal mortuary because MPI`s do blow up and we need a way to notify your next of kin
                NO PERSONAL QUESTIONS, THIS IS WHAT THE FORUM IS FOR.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bt Doctur View Post
                  "I never use my blower."

                  Can you post your full name, address, next of kin phone ,contact number , personal mortuary because MPI`s do blow up and we need a way to notify your next of kin
                  I knew I’d get grief for this. I probably should use it...but it’s true that they don’t have the same residual vapour linger that a carb open system does.
                  Point taken though and I’d never advise others to follow suit.

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                  • #24
                    While MPI's don't have as much of a chance to emit fuel vapors, there is always a chance of a leaking fuel line (tank to pump/filter) and don't forget, gas fill lines can leak as well. On multiport systems, the O-rings for the injectors can also leak, its a well known problem on certain systems. You have a gas inboard, you should have both a blower and gas vapor detector and USE BOTH. Once your boat reaches about 10 years old or so..look for cracks in the fuel lines...if you have to use ethanol fuel...that can degrade fuel lines..in fact...I've seen the metal cannister of a water separating fuel filter rust, left too long that will leak too. You should also open up the gas tank hatch or circular cover and check the lines where they connect to the tank and the gasket for the fuel sending unit, check once at the start of each season. There was a post on the Sea Swirl board of a boat that had a flash fire because the sending unit bolts were loose, allowed fuel vapors to build up and caused a fire. And it was an outboard boat!
                    1988 Four Winns 200 Horizon
                    4.3 OMC Cobra

                    98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0 Selectrac
                    07 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 5.7 Quadradrive II

                    "While air doesn't freeze....rust never sleeps"

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                    • #25
                      one crack in the fill hose or in the vent hose from the tank an enough fuel vapors fill the bilge that you become a 5 minute story on the 6pm news.

                      just the act of filling fuel at the dock is enough for vapors external to the boat to enter the boat and fill the bilge.

                      use your blowers, or at least list me as beneficiary.
                      Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                      1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                      Past Boats
                      1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                      2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                      1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                      What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

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                      • #26
                        https://www.fireboy-xintex.com/gasol...ume-detectors/

                        Yes, your nose is more sensitive, but these should be standard equipment on gas inboard boats, I added one about 6 years back. The older your boat gets the more important it is to have one.

                        Your house has smoke and CO detectors, right? Your inboard should have this....
                        1988 Four Winns 200 Horizon
                        4.3 OMC Cobra

                        98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0 Selectrac
                        07 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 5.7 Quadradrive II

                        "While air doesn't freeze....rust never sleeps"

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                        • #27
                          The Xintex manual says: "Due to the harsh environmental conditions in marine applications, it is recommended to replace the Gasoline Fume Sensors every 3-4 years."
                          Worse than no detector at all is a detector that may not work.

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                          • #28
                            We used to have a '98 Stingray I/O, and now have an '07 I/O. The blower in the '07 works so much better(more powerful and moves much more air).
                            If I'm under 20 mph I'll turn it on. Even while cruising I'll turn it on every few minutes for about a minute. Although the air intake on the engine is probably doing enough for the work.

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                            • #29
                              Sign up today
                              I don't shut a blower off.

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