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1998 Bayliner Trophy - Why can’t I just plug the scuppers?

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  • 1998 Bayliner Trophy - Why can’t I just plug the scuppers?

    Water is coming into the boat when there is 4 adults and weight shifts to the back. Everyone’s feet get wet, and if someone has a bag on the deck, it’s an issue.

    I see no need for these stupid things. I get their function, but I’d rather just plug them and manually bail out the water with a cut milk jug.

    So I guess my question is - why not plug them From the inside? Alternatively, can I plug from the outside and run the scuppers from the deck into the bilge area and let the bilge do the work?

  • #2
    take a look at T-H marine flow-max-ball scupper or redistribute the weight better?
    Last edited by mike_i; August 2nd, 2020, 11:02 AM.

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    • #3
      You don’t need them 99.9% of the time...but it’s that 0.01% chance that gets people in trouble or killed.

      Look into the ping pong balls noted above
      ....

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      • #4
        Thanks guys. Dingbat - what’s the source of the danger? Boat filling with water and sinking? Where I am and how I use the boat, a ton of water in the boat is highly unlikely to happen (usually only go out on small inland lakes, minimal waves, never go out when raining).

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        • #5
          Golly.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tassie 1 View Post
            Golly.
            ????

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            • #7
              Your boat is. ( presumably ) a large boat, used on a freshwater lake in flat conditions yet is taking on enough water to get feet wet and also your friends possesions,

              We have three boats in the 23- 30 ft range, used in coastal/ ocean waters, upto 45 knots and 3.5- 4 mt waves/swell/chop
              Have never had anywhere near that amount of water come aboard in those conditions.

              Hence the golly comment.

              I think l will stay away from lakes.


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              • #8
                I have the same issue. A boatload of people or a full fuel tank and water will get onto the deck and wet your feet. It is real bad when the air or water are cold.

                I plug the scuppers with rubber crutch tips, while underway, but close to the fishing spot. They keep the water out while drifting or anchored.

                They are easy to kick out of the scuppers if any water gets into the boat And we kick them out, after leaving for home.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dahlbergdriver View Post
                  Where I am and how I use the boat, a ton of water in the boat is highly unlikely to happen
                  So is getting hit by lightening yet people still run for cover....

                  I've had standing water in the cockpit 3 times.

                  The first time I took a wake from what I assume was a passing boat (never saw it) over the windshield of a 20' cuddy cabin.

                  I got the bow swung around to take it head on but it rolled up and over the windshield filling the bilge to floor level. Shorting out the bilge pump and submerging the starter in the process. Shaken, I sold the boat soon there after for one with a self bailing cockpit.

                  The other two times I buried the bow in a following sea. Conditions where actually good. We ran 25 miles down Bay to "catch a bite" earlier in the day. In the mean time, the tide turned and rollers started to build for the trip home.

                  My bow is a good 50" above water line.... obviously not high enough to deal with steep, 6 to 8 foot rollers we encountered on the way back.

                  No matter which way you go, plugs or ping pong balls, keep in mind that water weighs #8 per gallon..... It doesn't take much to push a boat over it's weight capacity and swamp.
                  ....

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                  • #10
                    if you have water coming in the scuppers, your boat may already have compromised (water soaked) foam.


                    the scuppers should be far enough above the water line, that everyone should be able to stand in the back of the boat and you not take on water.


                    weigh the boat
                    Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scott Danforth View Post
                      if you have water coming in the scuppers, your boat may already have compromised (water soaked) foam.


                      the scuppers should be far enough above the water line, that everyone should be able to stand in the back of the boat and you not take on water.


                      weigh the boat
                      I was thinking the same thing, sounds like the boat is overloaded. Either a lot of wet foam/wood or some very large friends!
                      1978 Grew 194 with Merc 165 inline6, MC1 drive

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KJM View Post

                        I was thinking the same thing, sounds like the boat is overloaded. Either a lot of wet foam/wood or some very large friends!
                        Flooding scuppers is the result of a pretty common design flaw". Some boats/brands are notorious for it.

                        https://www.boatus.com/seaworthy/mag...boats-sink.asp

                        The American Boat & Yacht Council (ABYC) has recommended standards for the placement of scuppers, scupper sizes, and the minimum heights above the load waterline of scuppers both while the boat is static and at maximum heel. Time and time again, we see scuppers that are right at the waterline and often well below the waterline due to poor design. An immediate sign of a pending problem is a boat with float-ball-style scuppers to prevent back-flooding; if you're considering such a boat to buy, don't walk away from it — run. Cockpit decks are supposed to be designed to be a minimum of four inches above the waterline but aren't always. Even when a slight amount of water drains into the bilge, the result is disaster because the boats may be designed on the edge with little safety margin.
                        ....

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                        • #13
                          Wow, you would think that builders wouldn't be allowed to build boats with scuppers below the water line! Thats crazy! Good information to keep in mind though, thanks!
                          1978 Grew 194 with Merc 165 inline6, MC1 drive

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                          • #14
                            Which model Trophy? I had a 1996 WA and never had that issue. I think we need to know more to better advise you. Plugging them is not ideal. Is the water coming in while you’re on plane? Have you looked at trim tabs?
                            "If it ain't broke....don't worry, 5 minutes with me and it will be!"

                            2000 Angler 204 F - '00 Yamaha 150
                            1994 Tremblay Custom Flats - '94 Merc 90 hp (SOLD)
                            1988 Sunbird SWL 200 - Evinrude 130 hp Looper (SOLD)
                            1996 Trophy 1802 - 120hp Force (SOLD)

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                            • #15
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                              Originally posted by KJM View Post
                              Wow, you would think that builders wouldn't be allowed to build boats with scuppers below the water line! Thats crazy! Good information to keep in mind though, thanks!
                              The height of the scupper is not the problem. It’s the height of the floor above the water line.

                              The scuppers are just the means of the water seeking equilibrium with the surface of the water.
                              ....

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