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Help me understand ACR

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  • Help me understand ACR

    Good morning everyone,

    I have a Four Winns I/O which came with a marine starting battery. I had a one year old deep cycle battery so I added a second battery with an isolator switch that allows to run off of battery 1, 2 or combined.

    When we go out for the day I turn the battery selector switch to 1 or 2 and try to remember to use a different battery every time.

    The reason for adding the battery was backup and try to avoid being stranded.

    I'm looking at adding a stereo to the boat (the one in it is shot) that would run off of the deep cycle battery.

    Help me understand how an ACR helps my situation. How does the ACR interact with the battery selector switch?


  • #2
    The only reason your flipping back and forth between batteries is for charging.

    An ACR (automatic charge relay) keeps the starting battery at full charge then diverts the excess to house battery automatically.

    The switch has on/off/both.

    I turn the the switch on in the morning and off when I get back. Both is to combine batteries for those tuff, cold morning starts
    ....

    Comment


    • #3
      In looking at the diagram again, it looks to me like the purpose of the ACR is to charge both batteries whenever the alternator is charging?

      This makes sense but in order to really take advantage of this system I'd need to separate house and starting loads. Currently the battery selector switch is connected to the large positive cable going to the motor and the "house" loads come off of the motor wiring.

      I'd need to isolate those to the house battery to really have the advantage of the system pictured right?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by suds1421 View Post
        In looking at the diagram again, it looks to me like the purpose of the ACR is to charge both batteries whenever the alternator is charging?

        This makes sense but in order to really take advantage of this system I'd need to separate house and starting loads. Currently the battery selector switch is connected to the large positive cable going to the motor and the "house" loads come off of the motor wiring.

        I'd need to isolate those to the house battery to really have the advantage of the system pictured right?
        You are correct.
        The only thing connected to my starting battery is the motor, chart plotter and vhf. Everything else is powered by house battery
        ....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dingbat View Post
          You are correct.
          The only thing connected to my starting battery is the motor, chart plotter and vhf. Everything else is powered by house battery
          Thanks! The ACR would still help me without separating loads because it would ensure both batteries are getting charged. Boat is in storage but I'll have a look when I get it out and see how easy it would be to separate the house loads from the motor.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by suds1421 View Post

            Thanks! The ACR would still help me without separating loads because it would ensure both batteries are getting charged. Boat is in storage but I'll have a look when I get it out and see how easy it would be to separate the house loads from the motor.
            It only transfers the charge when the starting battery is fully charged and the line voltage exceeds x volts for a time period.

            If demand is close to supply on the starting battery, you may or may not charge the house battery at any given time
            ....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dingbat View Post

              An ACR (automatic charge relay) starts
              That helps. Learn something new everyday.

              I always carry a fully charged good quality battery booster. Not just for our boat many times someone needs a boost out on the water. I've been caught with a dead battery because I had too many accessories on without the engine running. Luckily there was just enough juice to start the kicker when we were 10 miles offshore and not another boat within sight. .I buaght a battery booster the next day.
              Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post
                always carry a fully charged good quality battery booster.
                I carry one as well, it’s called the house battery. Can’t forget it at home. Always charged when I go to use it

                Sizing the battery to the load is the key. I ran a starting and deep cycle for a number of years. Worked well until I added a backup chart plotter and upgraded to a 1kW sounder. After 6-7 hours of trolling the sounder would start acting weird and or shutdown.

                Long story short, now running two grp. 27 deep cycles with an ACR. I can go 10 hours w/o an under voltage alarm. Simplified battery management tremendously
                ....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dingbat View Post
                  I carry one as well, it’s called the house battery. Can’t forget it at home. Always charged when I go to use it

                  Sizing the battery to the load is the key. I ran a starting and deep cycle for a number of years. Worked well until I added a backup chart plotter and upgraded to a 1kW sounder. After 6-7 hours of trolling the sounder would start acting weird and or shutdown.

                  Long story short, now running two grp. 27 deep cycles with an ACR. I can go 10 hours w/o an under voltage alarm. Simplified battery management tremendously
                  How do you recharge all that capacity?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    2/3 bank battery charger would be my bet. Plug it in when you get to the dock and let it charge overnight.
                    2017 Chaparral 19 H2O Ski & Fish w./4.3L 180HP Merc Alpha
                    2005 Four Winns 200Le x/5.0L Volvo SX-M (270HP - FI) - ordered new, traded in on Chaparral
                    1999 Bayliner Capri 1800LS w/2000 Honda 115HP - ordered new, traded in on Four Winns
                    1956 MFG 15' w/matching Evinrude Big Twin 30HP - presumed to be a sandbox somewhere


                    Tow Vehicle:
                    2017 Toyota 4Runner SR5 Premium 4x4

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dingbat View Post

                      It only transfers the charge when the starting battery is fully charged and the line voltage exceeds x volts for a time period.
                      If demand is close to supply on the starting battery, you may or may not charge the house battery at any given time
                      ACR's only understand voltage, not state of charge of the starting battery. At least in my experience on my hard-to-start 1985 Ford 460 RV, the ACR will kick over to both battery banks a minute after starting the main engine, even if the engine was finicky and the starting battery is near dead.

                      My ACR has a minimum of 1 minute delay, and needs 13v. The required minimum to charge a battery is 12.9 volts, so unless the demand on the starting battery is equal or greater than the alternator, it is going to flip.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by drunkenWaterRat View Post
                        My ACR has a minimum of 1 minute delay, and needs 13v. The required minimum to charge a battery is 12.9 volts, so unless the demand on the starting battery is equal or greater than the alternator, it is going to flip.
                        Blues Sea add a battery spec
                        • Closing voltage: 13/26V (2 min.) or 13.6/27.2V (30 sec.)
                        • Opening voltage: 12.75/25.5V (30 sec.)
                        ....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by briangcc View Post
                          2/3 bank battery charger would be my bet. Plug it in when you get to the dock and let it charge overnight.
                          Well, you lost that bet.....lol

                          Apparently I’m one of the few that uses their boat
                          enough that the dedicated onboard charging system, aka alternator, does the job.

                          I’ll throw a charger on them maybe 2-3 times a year to top them off if I think about. Connect my vintage 1989 Craftsmen battery charger (6/12V - 2/10A) and forget about (sometimes literally, oops) it until the green light comes on.

                          Primitive by modern expectations but it works for me Currently working with battery date codes of 2010 and 2011
                          ....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sign up today
                            Originally posted by dingbat View Post
                            Well, you lost that bet.....lol

                            Apparently I’m one of the few that uses their boat
                            enough that the dedicated onboard charging system, aka alternator, does the job.

                            I’ll throw a charger on them maybe 2-3 times a year to top them off if I think about. Connect my vintage 1989 Craftsmen battery charger (6/12V - 2/10A) and forget about (sometimes literally, oops) it until the green light comes on.

                            Primitive by modern expectations but it works for me Currently working with battery date codes of 2010 and 2011
                            Thanks for the reply.

                            Comment

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