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Reel oil (recommendations)

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  • Reel oil (recommendations)

    Baitcasting Reels . I use Remington gun oil but does anyone know of a good reel oil ? I ordered some on line for about $10.00 a ounce did'nt work very good and cost too much .Years ago used 3 in 1 oil but they changed it and it's too heavy now .

  • #2
    I use Hoppe's #9 gun oil
    San Diego, CA "The 619"

    "Nemo" (since Jul 2004): 1978 StarCraft 15' TriStar, 1978-88 "FrankenMotor" Mercury 70
    Unnamed (since Dec 2016): 2000 Sea Hunt Triton 172 CC, 2014 Mercury OptiMax 125

    "It's always easier to ask forgiveness than permission" -Colin Powell, et.al.

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    • #3
      +1 on the gun oil.

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      • #4
        I use Rocket Fuel on my conventional reels. Yellow on competition reels. Red on everything else.

        Super Lube on gears. Cal's Drag grease on drag washers, if needed
        ....

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        • #5
          If gun oil works for you jut keep using it. I use to use gun oil with no problems. Now I use Reel Butter. It's great stuff. It's made to lubricate steel, brass, steel, everything you find inside a reel.

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          • #6
            I use the inexpensive Berkeley oil and haven't had any issues. I talked to the guy that reconstructs reels at EJW and he said it was just as good as the more expensive stuff.

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            • #7
              Did not somebody say any oil is better than no oil at all?
              most folks never oil there reels at all. I still use 3 in 1 for most things reels included.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MRS View Post
                Did not somebody say any oil is better than no oil at all?
                Judging from the reels I get in for repair, most would be better off not using any oil at all. .

                Contaminated, oil soaked drag washers are common place. Side covers and bridge assemblies gumed up with oil turned to varnish is pretty much the norm.

                Grease on gears...oil on bearings.

                ....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dingbat View Post
                  Judging from the reels I get in for repair, most would be better off not using any oil at all. .

                  Contaminated, oil soaked drag washers are common place. Side covers and bridge assemblies gumed up with oil turned to varnish is pretty much the norm.

                  Grease on gears...oil on bearings.
                  What brand oil and grease do you recommend dingbat? I use my wife's sewing machine oil on my good reels, I'm not one to spend more than 150 bucks on a reel as we don't cast much for Bass and Musky much these days. If she runs out I use 3 in 1. My level winds for trolling Walleye and Salmonids aren't expensive either, smooth drags bit not heavy duty like you Salt guys use. It's not like I am likely to set a reel on fire out freshwater fishing here unless I am lucky enough to hook into a 40 lb King. The average Walleye here On Erie is 5 or 6 lbs. They fight like a rubber boot anyway. We hunt them for meat only here on Erie.
                  Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post

                    What brand oil and grease do you recommend dingbat? I use my wife's sewing machine oil on my good reels, I'm not one to spend more than 150 bucks on a reel as we don't cast much for Bass and Musky much these days. If she runs out I use 3 in 1. My level winds for trolling Walleye and Salmonids aren't expensive either, smooth drags bit not heavy duty like you Salt guys use. It's not like I am likely to set a reel on fire out freshwater fishing here unless I am lucky enough to hook into a 40 lb King. The average Walleye here On Erie is 5 or 6 lbs. They fight like a rubber boot anyway. We hunt them for meat only here on Erie.
                    Super Lube is my go to grease for reel lubrication. A full synthetic grease that doesn't turn to varnish, melt or separate.

                    Oils are different because I want an oil of certain viscosity. While Remington and 3:1 oil may have good protective qualities, but that's not the attribute that's important to me. I look at viscosity because its primary means of controlling the friction (speed) of the spool bearings of a casting reel. Too little friction and the reel becomes uncontrollable, i.e. bird's nest. Too much friction and casting distance suffers. Therefore it's a balancing act between control and performance. As an avid Surf fisherman, I carry Rocket Fuel, yellow and tournament for my conventional reels.

                    Trolling wise, we probably use similar equipment. For Stripers, I run a mix of Penn 320 and 330 GTi level winds on IGFA #20 and #30 blanks. Stripers are not much for fighting either but they average #20-25 and #50+ are certainly possible so drags are important. I've modified the drag stack by adding an additional drag washer to each. I also run them "wet" (lithium drag grease) to reduce contamination and over heating that leads to sticky drags.

                    As noted earlier, people over oil reels to the extreme. Oil and grease once, maybe twice a year tops. All my reels are torn down, cleaned, inspected and lubricated every winter. They will not be oiled or greased the entire season.

                    The only exception are my conventional surf casting reels ($$$$). The combination of salt and sand plays havoc on them. They are cleaned, inspected, and oiled at the end of each day.

                    Spinning Reels: A drop the size of a pin head on the bail pivot points, the articulation in the handle (if applicable) and the shaft thru the knob on the end of the handle is about it. No oil on the spool shaft or drag knob/adjuster.

                    Casting reels: a drop in each bearing, a wee bit on the level wind mechanism and the shaft thru the knob(s) on the end of the handle(s)...that's it.

                    As a saltwater guy, everything get hosed down with freshwater at the end of the day and gets a light misting of WD 40 which is them wiped of with a clean rag and left to dry.
                    ....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dingbat View Post

                      Super Lube is my go to grease for reel lubrication. A full synthetic grease that doesn't turn to varnish, melt or separate.

                      Oils are different because I want an oil of certain viscosity. While Remington and 3:1 oil may have good protective qualities, but that's not the attribute that's important to me. I look at viscosity because its primary means of controlling the friction (speed) of the spool bearings of a casting reel. Too little friction and the reel becomes uncontrollable, i.e. bird's nest. Too much friction and casting distance suffers. Therefore it's a balancing act between control and performance. As an avid Surf fisherman, I carry Rocket Fuel, yellow and tournament for my conventional reels.

                      Trolling wise, we probably use similar equipment. For Stripers, I run a mix of Penn 320 and 330 GTi level winds on IGFA #20 and #30 blanks. Stripers are not much for fighting either but they average #20-25 and #50+ are certainly possible so drags are important. I've modified the drag stack by adding an additional drag washer to each. I also run them "wet" (lithium drag grease) to reduce contamination and over heating that leads to sticky drags.

                      As noted earlier, people over oil reels to the extreme. Oil and grease once, maybe twice a year tops. All my reels are torn down, cleaned, inspected and lubricated every winter. They will not be oiled or greased the entire season.

                      The only exception are my conventional surf casting reels ($$$$). The combination of salt and sand plays havoc on them. They are cleaned, inspected, and oiled at the end of each day.

                      Spinning Reels: A drop the size of a pin head on the bail pivot points, the articulation in the handle (if applicable) and the shaft thru the knob on the end of the handle is about it. No oil on the spool shaft or drag knob/adjuster.

                      Casting reels: a drop in each bearing, a wee bit on the level wind mechanism and the shaft thru the knob(s) on the end of the handle(s)...that's it.

                      As a saltwater guy, everything get hosed down with freshwater at the end of the day and gets a light misting of WD 40 which is them wiped of with a clean rag and left to dry.
                      Thank you very much, great info. I'm using too much oil it appears. For trolling I am running Okuma and Shimano. All Shimano baitcasters and spinning set ups. I have never lost a fish because of a Shimano reel. I can't say the same thing about others.
                      Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post
                        I have never lost a fish because of a Shimano reel.
                        Not a fan of Shimano's "not so long" long term support policies...

                        Okuma's parts support is horrid but some of their spinning reels (Avenger series) offer a lot of value for the dollar. Use them, abuse them and throw them away cause you can't get parts.

                        All my trolling reels have "Made in the USA" stamped in the bottoms of the reel seats. All my conventional reels have "Made in Sweden" stamped on the side plates. Unfortunately, Abu Garcia no longer markets the entire Ambassaeur series in North America. You have to go to Europe or Australia to pick them up.

                        Parts are readily available from both manufacturers going back 50 years
                        ....

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                        • #13
                          I use this for all my down rigging needs now and totally love it.The only thing I don't like is that I have to reel in with my right hand and though I'm right handed on all my reels for ever ive reeled in with my left hand .Is it hard to change over to left hand reeling dingbat?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 82rude View Post
                            Is it hard to change over to left hand reeling dingbat?
                            The instructions to change from right to left hand reeling are here

                            http://www.daiwa.com/us/service/manu...UTD200-400.pdf
                            Last edited by dingbat; February 15th, 2018, 01:00 PM.
                            ....

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                            • #15
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                              Originally posted by dingbat View Post
                              The instructions to change from right to left hand reeling are here

                              http://www.daiwa.com/us/service/manu...UTD200-400.pdf
                              Thanks dingbat.Me I use rem action cleaner and rem oil sparingly.
                              Last edited by 82rude; February 15th, 2018, 06:41 PM.

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