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Baitcasting to Spincasting

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  • #16
    I will use either depending on what and where. Most of time use baitcaster with 4 to 10 oz weight pluss bait. With 10 foot rods can anchor in one spot and cast to many others. If in not so fast current and targeting smaller kitties will use spinners. Yes, do tangle once in awhile. Can feel it coming on thumb. Alot of baitcasting is learning controll. And yes, as mentioned, matching rod and reel. Line matching is another aspect.

    There are many baitcasters out now with fantastic free spool drags. Some are not that high priced either. Lasting ability or quality unknown.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by prlwng View Post
      With 10 foot rods can anchor in one spot and cast to many others.
      Somewhat confused.

      Are you using a 10' rod as the "anchor" in a trolley rig type setup or are you fishing 10' rods from an anchored boat?

      What rods and reels are you using to throw 10 oz.?



      ....

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      • #18
        Anchored with very good anchor setup. Ussually if you let boat drift with current will travel at 5 to 7 mph. GPS. Poles are bnm 10 foot heavey , penn 309 reels, being replaced with abu 6500 c3s. 50 lb braid , 2 foot leader of 40lb mono. 5ott circle daytime with cut bullhead or creek chub. Small pieces. Nitetime will move to a diffrent area above snags. Then 8ott circles with live bullheads, fins trimed.

        Did just get a new Wiskerseeker 9.5 foot spinner rod, heavey. Mounting my D.A.M. quick super on it. Same line ussage. That reel is kind of an antique. Very heavey duty tho. Tryed casting it with 8oz and kinda hard to cast accuratly.

        When up on Red river of ND current not as bad. Drop to 4 to 6 oz.

        There are alot of newer style reels that will give you better controll and accuracy. Kinda old foogy tho. With what it sounds like you are casting there are some light duty poles with a good free rooling caster is needed. Even I will use a spinner for bait catching.

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        • #19
          I agree that bait casters have their pluses and minuses. Plus is the ease and accuracy flipping and target casting, they hold more line and the drag systems are superb if you spend the $$ on a premium reel. The minus is they make a mess of your line if you have continuous back lashes and good reels are 300 or more Samolians. Many just quit using one, like I did for 30 years then they put the reel and rod away or hang them on a wall. Like I said in an earlier post if you don't want problems with them spend the money for a premium reel. There are many manufactures out there but I prefure Shimano. With the long line trolling we do here on the Great Lakes I use downrigger type rods and reels 99% of the time I fish so didn't spend the $$ on a new premium Shimano I once used all day with zero back lash

          . An excelent tip I was given that did help me avoid Carbuncklements (back lash) was to take the rod and reel and put on the hardware you are going to use that day, if changing weight you can do this on shore or in the boat. Put on your lure and let it drop to the ground. If it over spools adjust the brake and tension slowly until when the bait hits the ground there is zero backlash. When set properly it will over spool just a tad. If that isn't working for you leave the dang thing at home or break open the piggy bank and buy a good quality bait caster and match the rod for your quarry. As far as your spinning rod and reel problems I have never heard of such trouble with the bend in a spinning rod. The scientific fancy name for the bend in a rod is "Parabolic curve." A spinning rod matched to the weight it says on the side of the rod as well as what test line you should use usually in Mono, there are charts available that will translate Mono to other types of line we have today. Your Parabolic curve or bend should be an axis of no more than 50%. Some guys use rods so stiff they hardly bend at all, usually Bass Pros. If your rod bends as much as yours does that rod may have a break in the inner graphite. Unless one is a very avid fisherman there is no need to spend more than 100 bucks for a spinning rod, I know guys that have $300.00 rods and can't catch a cold but can tell anyone that will listen they have 300 buck rods and 300 buck reels. Buy a new rod and go fishing, please.
          Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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          • #20
            I As far as your spinning rod and reel problems I have never heard of such trouble with the bend in a spinning rod. The scientific fancy name for the bend in a rod is "Parabolic curve." Your Parabolic curve or bend should be an axis of no more than 50%. Some guys use rods so stiff they hardly bend at all, usually Bass Pros. If your rod bends as much as yours does that rod may have a break in the inner graphite.
            One of the most understood things about fishing are rod ratings.

            Blank designer use tapers, sometime multiple, hoop strengths (thickness) and materials (graphite, fiberglass and hybrids) to control where (action) and how much (power) a blank deflects under load. From there, it's up to the skill of the rod maker to design and build a rod to met the customer's expectations.

            I keep no less than 10 blank manufacturers catalogs on-hand when selecting the right blank for a customer. More times than not, you can find a suitable blank off the shelf but there are times when the best you can do is get close, then modify accordingly. Trimming from the tip of a blank the rod makes them "faster". Trimming from the butt makes them "slower". You can affect a rod's action and power using guide selection and placement as well.

            On spinning rods, I use "Concept" guides and placement exclusively unless asked otherwise. I got to chuckle when I see "Concept" rods sold in stores. How do you mass produce a rod where guide size and placement is determined by a reels up sweep (angle between spool and blank) and spool diameter? Yes, they do vary greatly even within single manufacturer's product line.

            A spinning rod matched to the weight it says on the side of the rod as well as what test line you should use usually in Mono, there are charts available that will translate Mono to other types of line we have today.
            Not sure how this would work. Tensile strength is tensile strength.

            The line ratings do not indicate how much weight the rod will lift or suitable line weight directly. The rating on the rod indicates the most suitable breaking strength line to use on the rod, assuming the drag is set correctly (25-30%) on the reel. The rating is specifically designed to achieve a working curve in the rod, without reaching the rod's "lock-up" point.

            To determine the "working strength" of a blank, run some line through the rod and attach a scale to the end of the line. Pull down on the scale until the rod has a good working curve. The weight on the scale gives you the drag setting for the reel.

            Working out the line to use on the rod is simple. Multiply the working curve weight by four. For instance, if the working curve weight is #5, then you should be using #15 to #20 line with your drag set to #5.

            ....

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            • #21
              I think if you try for years to use a casting reel and can't, stick with the spinners that work and be happy. When I use the casting reels I set the drop from the spool to the weight of the lure that I am using lure almost free falls tiny bit of resistance
              as the lure falls. Plus you got to use your wrist when casting not your whole body like I see a lot of people trying to do and most important must have thumb control on the spool at all times. Here are the reels I am fishing now one is 40 yr.s old the
              other not sure but at least 30 yr.s just change drag washers every few years and lube up. Take a licking and keep on fishing
              they look awful but work great for me any how.

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              • #22
                MRS. Yep they sure are oldie reels. But I bet they work for you and that's all that counts. I like to "palm" the reel and those knucklebusters you have wouldn't feel right in my hand since I am use to smaller palmable (is that a word?) reels. But my Shimano Bantam is over 30 years old. It usually finds itself used as a trolling reel. If I use it to cast I need heavy hardware at the end of the line and can cast it all day without getting carbuncklements.

                dingbat , you know your stuff. I understood some of it but it sure is far beyond Rod Making 101.

                Johnny D/Selkirk ON. Canada
                Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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                • #23
                  Sixty Five years ago (when I was a widdle kid) my Dad gave me an old Shakespeare bait caster mounted on a 4.5" steel rod. It was Grandpa's. I guess from the 1940's. It worked OK for me and I caught a lot of fish. It didn't take too long to figure out how to not tangle it.

                  Back then, my Mom used a newer Pflueger bait caster that my Dad bought her when I was still in short pants. She loved that reel, worked it like magic, and would never let anyone touch it but her.

                  In the 1960's my Uncle retired and he had no house or any interests at all, so he decided to go fishing. Until he passed, he literally went fishing every single day, rain, snow or shine. I went with him when I didn't have school (or later a girlfriend) and soon he bought me a closed face spinning reel, and then later an open face. When I got past being a teenager and got my first boat I took HIM along.

                  Four years ago, after my own retirement, and with a brand new Whaler fishing boat in tow, my wife bought me a newfangled bait caster for Christmas, along with a new 5 1/2' Ugly Stick. It was a Pflueger as well.

                  Now when I go fishing in the Niagara, I most often use the Pflueger. It's not hard to operate. But more than that, its just simply a lot of fun, and it brings me back to my humble roots.

                  Mom's, Dad's, Grandpa's and Father-in Law's old stuff now hold a prominent place on the wall of my boathouse. When I get too old to trail the boat anymore, maybe I'll just resurrect them and try them again on the shore.


                  2019 SeaRay SPX 190 OB & Mercury 150 4-Stroke & Merc 5.0 Kicker
                  2017 Boston Whaler 150 Montauk & Mercury 60 ELPT Command Thrust & Merc 3.5 Kicker
                  2015 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO
                  1964 Sea Nymph 14R & 1970 Evinrude Sportwin 9.5
                  1960 Mulray 100 Dinghy, equipped with Beaver Oars
                  1952 Lyman 15' Mid Steer & Evinrude Big Twin 25
                  69 Outboards: 1919-2019, representing 11 manufacturers
                  -------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Member ACBS, LBOA, AOMCI

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Old Ironmaker;n10821200

                    [quote
                    dingbat , you know your stuff. I understood some of it but it sure is far beyond Rod Making 101.
                    I got into rod building out of necessity when I took up surf fishing in the 80’s.

                    At the time, there where not factory rods and the blank companies had just started getting into the surf market. My first surf rod was built on a blanked designed for sturgeon fishing.

                    I was very fortunate to have two very skilled veteran builders take the “new kid” under their wing and show me the tricks of the trade.

                    From there I expanded into inshore/offshore trolling rods (my second passion) and eventually into spinning, casting and light tackle jigging for inshore use.

                    Most, if not all the rods I build anymore are application, method or tackle (reel or lure) specific rods.

                    Customer specific builds only. Don’t make 25 rods of a given design in different colors and market them as “custom”. All signed.....
                    Last edited by dingbat; January 12th, 2020, 08:57 AM.
                    ....

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                    • #25
                      [QUOTE=dingbat;n10824926][QUOTE=Old Ironmaker;n10821200

                      I got into rod building out of necessity when I took up surf fishing in the 80’s.

                      At the time, there where not factory rods and the blank companies had just started getting into the surf market. My first surf rod was built on a blanked designed for sturgeon fishing.

                      I was very fortunate to have two very skilled veteran builders take the “new kid” under their wing and show me the tricks of the trade.

                      From there I expanded into inshore/offshore trolling rods (my second passion) and eventually into spinning, casting and light tackle jigging for inshore use.

                      Most, if not all the rods I build anymore are application, method or tackle (reel or lure) specific rods.

                      Customer specific builds only. Don’t make 25 rods of a given design in different colors and market them as “custom”. All signed.....[/QUOTE]

                      Excellent dingbat. I know some "custom" rod builders where I am in Ontario. Most are more works of art than fishable rods. I personally have never bought one of their "custom" rods. #1, I would be afraid of scratching one. #2 based on the price I would always be afraid to scratch one. I do know guys that have them and actually use them. One gent I know had to have one to go along with his $80,000.00 European luxury 4X4 he needed to get to the water with class. The thing is he is always getting someone else to drive to the water in their Silverado, Ram or F-150.
                      Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        [QUOTE=Old Ironmaker;n10825470]
                        Originally posted by dingbat View Post

                        Excellent dingbat. I know some "custom" rod builders where I am in Ontario. Most are more works of art than fishable rods. I personally have never bought one of their "custom" rods. #1, I would be afraid of scratching one. #2 based on the price I would always be afraid to scratch one. I do know guys that have them and actually use them.
                        Most of the cost is in the blank and handle assembly. Unless you damage the blank, its far too easy to “refresh” a rod not to use it. Some of mine have been stripped and rewrapped more than once.

                        Restorations are my favorite projects. Restoring someone’s Dad or Grandpa’s rod back to new is both challenging and rewarding.

                        Currently restoring an early, split bamboo St. Croix spin cast rod for a neighbor. It was his dads.
                        ....

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          [QUOTE=dingbat;n10826454]
                          Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post
                          Most of the cost is in the blank and handle assembly. Unless you damage the blank, its far too easy to “refresh” a rod not to use it. Some of mine have been stripped and rewrapped more than once.

                          Restorations are my favorite projects. Restoring someone’s Dad or Grandpa’s rod back to new is both challenging and rewarding.

                          Currently restoring an early, split bamboo St. Croix spin cast rod for a neighbor. It was his dads.
                          I collect antique rods and reels. Some I pick up at yard sale and flea markets some anywhere else I can find them. They made rods by the millions even 100 years ago. Many are not rare or expensive. I actually like them as they are, worn and with a story to tell. My price possessions are a few Halibut rods I got in Nova Scotia and a home made cane rod from the South Pacific my Uncle brought back after WW2.
                          Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Sign up today
                            I think Mav6759 went home; the thread took off on a life of it's own, but reading through provokes me to add my 2c.
                            I believe MANY would be bait-caster-ers get whacked right out of the gate because they don't know anything about the centrifugal brakes, as stated by one, if need be, just put all the brakes on and back off as necessary. I also keep my thumb over the spool almost constantly, just not necessarily touching. I do believe braided line is easier to un-flumox than monofilament though if you do backlash (maybe just me), but I also have no issue casting a 3/8 - 1/2 oz rubber frog with my baitcaster - and with fair distance. I love my Lew Childers speed stick, Garcia 5600 and braided line in the pads. I also do not believe you have to spend major bucks to have a good time with a baitcaster. The reel is just equipment, the operator is the talent. As most tradesman will tell you, you blame the operator, not the equipment. Lance Armstrong could beat me on a Mongoose if I was on a Cervelo S3.

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