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Volvo penta aq211 swapping 1pc to 2 pc rear main seal block

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  • Volvo penta aq211 swapping 1pc to 2 pc rear main seal block

    Doing some trading with the race shop next to my shop (trading a built/modded 268 husqvarna for a 350) this flyweel on the back of my AQ211A NO CU76064


    14893627 is the block stamp

    i believe this is a 2 pc rear main. They mostly have the newer 1pc. Will my splined coupler assembly fit on a newer style block with a std 153 tooth flywheel? Or must i stick to a 2 pc 350

  • #2
    If your coupler is the one that looks like a clutch disk then it will bolt up to the earlier flywheel that goes on the 2 piece rear main seal model. The crankshaft flywheel bolt pattern for the later 1 piece style seal is different than the earlier 2 piece style seal if I read your post right.
    Kenner, Louisiana 1980 Donzi 18'. 2+3 6.2 MPI Alpha 1

    Comment


    • #3
      Let me try to rephrase this

      Yes my current motor has a sprung coupler that looks like a clutch that bolts to the flywheel in bolt holes that look identical to that of a standard car/truck flywheel that would hold the pressure plate.

      Are the is the volvo penta a standard auto flywheel? If so, do would the clutch looking coupler(stock volvo part) bolt to both a 1pc and 2pc rear main flywheel?

      Comment


      • #4
        your coupler will bolt to ANY 153 tooth GM flywheel. and you can only run a 153 tooth flywheel in the AQ series PDS hoursing (flywheel housing) for GM motors. a 168 tooth flywheel will not fit (I know, I tried).

        the flywheel is a stock GM manual truck flywheel (Volvo Penta and Mercruiser bought the motors from GM)

        so get the appropriate $75 flywheel for your crank,damper,engine balance and bolt your damper plate (coupler) to it and install the PDS hoursing. however you may want to install new bearings and seals in the PDS housing since you have that off.

        the motor you are getting will need to have brass core plugs, a marine cam and marine head gaskets prior to you bolting all you stuff up to it.
        Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

        1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

        Past Boats
        1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
        2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
        1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

        What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

        Comment


        • #5
          Are you swapping just the bare block, or a short block?

          Comment


          • #6
            A whole block. Putting in closed loop cooling (although the shop has uses brass freeze plugs for years now) i have a parts 5.7 mercruiser ill be taking the 4bbl marine carb off of. I'll have to see if i can find a linkage adapter for the volvo as i believe they are different.

            Its a .030 bore 9.5 comp dished piston 4 bolt, vortec heads. Im not sure the cam will work for me. It already has a carb intake. Ill put my starter, alternator on it. Being it will be closed loop ill keep the stk thermostat and water pump i believe.

            I got this boat for fishing out of murrels inlet and the keys so i figured closed loop cooling is a must.


            Im having issues finding oem volvo penta transom sealing ring and doughnut o rings. I also need a new exhaust o ring (sp290a) ill do the bellows while in there too. I have the bellhosing off, my dad is going by the bearing warehouse this week to match up quality timken or kkb(?) Bearing and seals. I've just gotta get around to removing them.

            We have highs in the 60s now so im putting in my new transom this weekend. I want it installed by Xmas so i can start on the cabin, interior and top at the start of the year when it really gets cold. All these heat lamps overnight are going to kill my electric bill.

            Comment


            • #7
              sorry for all the typos. My phone screen is cracked and not only am i terrible at touch screens but the cracked screen plus auto correct makes the phone have a mind of its own.

              Comment


              • #8
                Turn off the auto correct....it helps

                Follow the links on the iboats site to OEM volvo parts and get the appropriate transom ring, donuts, o-rings, etc

                Since your getting the motor from a race shop, most likely you can not use the cam and will need a marine cam. Most cams in race motors will hydrolock in a marine environment

                If your running a heat exchanger, you can use a non-marine circulating pump and non marine head gaskets

                Throttle bracket, etc for volvo was set up for a holley carb. Wont work with the Rochester/Weber/mercarb that you are pulling from the mercruiser. You will have to get creative

                Recommend a remote oil filter and a remote oil drain to make maintenance easy
                Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                Past Boats
                1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                Comment


                • #9
                  You have 3300 style control cables which should not be a problem to connect to the carburetor.
                  As Scott mentioned about marine cams verses auto. Marine cams put the power band in the 35-4500 rpm range. Also a high overlap cam in a boat has to idle too high which can cause some interesting docking fun. Also causes carburetor problems because the throttle plates will be open too much to compensate for the low vacuum signal to cause the off idle circuit to start cutting in and mixing with the idle circuit, or even worse the power valve. You want to stay with the original marine carburetor that matches the throttle bore of the manifold it was on.
                  Kenner, Louisiana 1980 Donzi 18'. 2+3 6.2 MPI Alpha 1

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    most importantly.....marine cams have minimal overlap to prevent reversion (which in a boat will suck up water at idle causing hydro-loc). in a race cam, you want reversion to help with scavenging for more power.
                    Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                    Past Boats
                    1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                    2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                    1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                    What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dohcdelsol93 View Post
                      A whole block. Putting in closed loop cooling (although the shop has uses brass freeze plugs for years now) i have a parts 5.7 mercruiser ill be taking the 4bbl marine carb off of. I'll have to see if i can find a linkage adapter for the volvo as i believe they are different.

                      Its a .030 bore 9.5 comp dished piston 4 bolt, vortec heads. Im not sure the cam will work for me. It already has a carb intake. Ill put my starter, alternator on it. Being it will be closed loop ill keep the stk thermostat and water pump i believe.

                      I got this boat for fishing out of murrels inlet and the keys so i figured closed loop cooling is a must.


                      Im having issues finding oem volvo penta transom sealing ring and doughnut o rings. I also need a new exhaust o ring (sp290a) ill do the bellows while in there too. I have the bellhosing off, my dad is going by the bearing warehouse this week to match up quality timken or kkb(?) Bearing and seals. I've just gotta get around to removing them.

                      We have highs in the 60s now so im putting in my new transom this weekend. I want it installed by Xmas so i can start on the cabin, interior and top at the start of the year when it really gets cold. All these heat lamps overnight are going to kill my electric bill.
                      Vortec heads require less total timing advance than regular SBC heads. Be conservative on the cam..too mild is better than too aggressive. Can't help on outdrives.

                      Make sure of the engine balance..internal or external. Flywheels are different.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's a 1 pc 350, ill verify if its an internal or external balance since the rebuild. It was built for a daily driver years ago but was quickly pulled for a big block.

                        I've asked him a few times about the cam, he says it's a good cam for a boat but im sure im his mind he's thinking good for a 5000 rpm go fast boat. I dont want to sacrifice the hull speed permanence. This is a mini cabin cruiser so lots of time will be spent cruising. I will pull the timing cover to ID the cam before install and replace with a slightly better than stock boat/rv cam if it's not suitable.

                        It's not currently closed loop cooling, im adding new manifolds and the closed loop cooling. Im assuming these are original 1988 manifolds.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by aimlow View Post

                          Vortec heads require less total timing advance than regular SBC heads. Be conservative on the cam..too mild is better than too aggressive. Can't help on outdrives.

                          Make sure of the engine balance..internal or external. Flywheels are different.
                          Huh?.... Vortec heads are less prone to pre-detonation, so you can run more timing
                          Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                          1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                          Past Boats
                          1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                          2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                          1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                          What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Scott Danforth View Post

                            Huh?.... Vortec heads are less prone to pre-detonation, so you can run more timing
                            No. High turbulence chamber design enables faster flame front spread, and requires less timing lead. Quench helps, but dished pistons do not provide adequate quench clearance (0.040 or so). This is also why the "high swirl" intake ports on some 4.3 V6's require less total advance.

                            You only run enough timing advance so peak cylinder pressure is essentially at, or slightly after, TDC. Too much advance, and the pressure peak will try to push the piston down on the upstroke. This leads to power loss, possible detonation and damage.

                            On a race engine, or even a boat, which runs at pretty heavy throttle settings, it's better to be conservative on total timing.

                            Vacuum advance is used on street engines because at part throttle, the "effective" compression ratio is way less than the mechanical ratio, and additional advance is required to optimize the slower flame front spread and achieve peak cylinder pressure at the correct time.

                            Look at older restrictor plate NASCAR engines. If they accelerated too hard at low rpms, the 14:1 compression wil detonate the engine. However, at high rpms, the limited breathing reduces the effective compression ratio to a manageable level.

                            They run a methanol rich fuel now, and ethanol has a much higher effective "octane" and will support higher compression. There just isn't as much energy in the fuel itself.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              yet for some reason both Mercruiser and Volvo increased timing from 8 degrees BTDC to 10 degrees BTDC with the vortec heads (while still running the junk flat-top 4-relief pistons from GM) to help get the power from the motors that the vortec heads help extract.

                              Engine temp has more to do with timing than any amount of quench, even with properly built vortec motors with d-shapped (LCQ style) pistons.
                              Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                              1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                              Past Boats
                              1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                              2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                              1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                              What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                              Comment

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