Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Special fuel line needed for Marine?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Wow, thanks for all the feedback! I've a lot to learn.

    FYI, I've only had the boat about a month and it is parked in a boat house that is about 30 minutes from me and am not able to get to it very often. I haven't done anything with it yet, its as I got it (so in the case of fuel lines, it is currently as I got it).

    As for the inspection, I paid someone to go through the boat and inspect everything so I can get an idea of its current state and any critical things I need to do before using it this summer.

    This is what he put in the inspection report...

    The rubber hoses in the fuel system have a manufacture date of 1994. This includes the fuel fill hoses, vents, and supply lines.

    Recommendation... These hoses are in good shape for their age. No cracking or leakage sighted. The hoses should be renewed as a form of preventative maintenance. Keep in mind that the average useable life of this type of hose is approximately 10 years. According to the manufacturer after 10 years the rubber has broken down and the hose will not pass the 2 1/2 minute USCG open flame test.
    What do you think? Is he correct and I should replace them?

    As for the J1527 A1, is J1527 A1-15 ok to use? I only ask because it comes up in my searches and some of the descriptions I read almost sound like its a newer version of "A1".
    1995 Bayliner Avanti Express 3255
    Engines: Mercruiser 5.7L 4-57B110HS (0F438410 & 0F438409)
    Drives: 5-220200HS Bravo Two (0F510804 & 0F510645)

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by achris View Post
      I also checked that all the lines on the engine were originally metal, and as long as they aren't all rusted out, there is not 'age limit' on metal lines.
      I've assumed (often dangerous) the metal fuel tubing is stainless steel.
      '96 Larson 174 SEI BR. 4.3LX 4 bbl Weber s/n 0F786604. Alpha One Gen II s/n 0F709315

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by harringtondav View Post
        I've assumed (often dangerous) the metal fuel tubing is stainless steel.
        Ayuh,..... You assumed wrong,.... Factory metal lines are steel,.....

        I build new ones outa 3/8" automotive brake line,.....

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Hossbot View Post
          ...Keep in mind that the average useable life of this type of hose is approximately 10 years....
          Interesting.... And complete BS!

          My boat, 1972, still has original fill and vent lines. The supply line is 1994, as I replaced it when I refurbed the tank, which included a larger pickup, and hence supply line....

          My boat is inspected for insurance every 5 years, and nobody has said 'Boo' about the lines. I have 'double clamped' all fuel fittings, and I inspect them myself every year anyway.

          Chris.....
          xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
          The world takes on a whole new perspective when viewed from 100’ below.
          1972 Bertram ‘Bahia Mar’ 20
          2006 Mercruiser 4.3MPI (0W617679) w/Alpha One Gen II (0W829301)
          (Original - 1972 '165' In-line 6. Previous - 1994 4.3LX)


          Comment


          • #20
            Ayuh,..... I'm with Chris,...... 10 years, if in direct sunlight everyday, maybe,......

            Hidin' in the bilge,...... Many decades,....... 30, 40 years,.....

            Comment


            • #21
              Rubber lines deteriorate from the inside out. E10 fuel speeds this along. A visual of the exterior doesn't mean much
              1999 Powerquest 260 legend
              502 mpi
              B1

              Comment


              • #22
                A1-15 is the fuel line you need to use for lines that always have fuel in them, like the line from the fuel tank to the engine or filter.
                A2 or A1 fuel line should be used for lines that aren’t full of fuel all the time, like the tank fill and tank vent lines.

                Do your fuel lines need to be replaced? That depends on a few variables. It’s a lot like the discussions about fogging and/or using anti-freeze when you store the boat. The conditions that the boat is stored and used in make a big difference. Also where you buy your fuel can have a big effect because of where different refiners get the base stock that is used to make your fuel and many different chemicals are added or removed from the crude oil they start with depending on that and where the fuel is going to be sold.
                Next is how fuel lines fail, as scoflaw correctly points out. Fuel line start failing first on the inside and little pieces will fall off and plug things up. This probably isn’t a big concern of yours, because carburetors are a lot more tolerant of these little pieces than fuel injected engines and the filter will catch some of it.
                Next step is they will start to allow air to be sucked in (because air molecules are much smaller than fuel molecules) once again not as big a deal for carbs because they can get rid of the air much easier than a system like the MerCruiser cool fuel 2.
                The next step is they start to leak, and that can be really bad. It’s very important to not let them get to that point.
                It shocks me that some of the people on this board have fuel lines from the 70’s. They must have much better conditions and/or fuel then we have here in Minnesota. The fuel lines made in the 70’s weren’t designed to handle alcohol and have all been replaced. I have replaced many bad fuel lines on boats as new as the early 2000s. My brother has a 1996 boat that the lines are starting to get stiff and will get replaced this spring if he decides to “keep it one more year”.
                When the manufacturer say’s that their life is 10 years, what they are really saying is that they should last at least 10 years and may last longer.
                I recommend you listen to somebody knowledgeable who has actually seen your fuel lines rather then us internet guys.
                Good Luck Muc

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by muc View Post
                  Next is how fuel lines fail, as scoflaw correctly points out. Fuel line start failing first on the inside and little pieces will fall off and plug things up.
                  Sorry about my typical off-thread story. But on the thread, I use non-ethanol fuel since I had some hot air temp, hot engine throttle up stumbling with E10 with my boat. I've never given my fuel supply hoses a thought in 23 yrs.

                  Off the thread, I've had two disc caliper lock ups in older vehicles resulting from brake hoses deteriorating from the inside and preventing brake piston retraction by blocking reverse fluid flow. Fluid hoses rot from the inside. ...maybe I'm still on the thread.

                  '96 Larson 174 SEI BR. 4.3LX 4 bbl Weber s/n 0F786604. Alpha One Gen II s/n 0F709315

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Sign up today
                    Originally posted by muc View Post
                    A1-15 is the fuel line you need to use for lines that always have fuel in them, like the line from the fuel tank to the engine or filter.
                    A2 or A1 fuel line should be used for lines that aren’t full of fuel all the time, like the tank fill and tank vent lines.

                    Do your fuel lines need to be replaced? That depends on a few variables. It’s a lot like the discussions about fogging and/or using anti-freeze when you store the boat. The conditions that the boat is stored and used in make a big difference. Also where you buy your fuel can have a big effect because of where different refiners get the base stock that is used to make your fuel and many different chemicals are added or removed from the crude oil they start with depending on that and where the fuel is going to be sold.
                    Next is how fuel lines fail, as scoflaw correctly points out. Fuel line start failing first on the inside and little pieces will fall off and plug things up. This probably isn’t a big concern of yours, because carburetors are a lot more tolerant of these little pieces than fuel injected engines and the filter will catch some of it.
                    Next step is they will start to allow air to be sucked in (because air molecules are much smaller than fuel molecules) once again not as big a deal for carbs because they can get rid of the air much easier than a system like the MerCruiser cool fuel 2.
                    The next step is they start to leak, and that can be really bad. It’s very important to not let them get to that point.
                    It shocks me that some of the people on this board have fuel lines from the 70’s. They must have much better conditions and/or fuel then we have here in Minnesota. The fuel lines made in the 70’s weren’t designed to handle alcohol and have all been replaced. I have replaced many bad fuel lines on boats as new as the early 2000s. My brother has a 1996 boat that the lines are starting to get stiff and will get replaced this spring if he decides to “keep it one more year”.
                    When the manufacturer say’s that their life is 10 years, what they are really saying is that they should last at least 10 years and may last longer.
                    I recommend you listen to somebody knowledgeable who has actually seen your fuel lines rather then us internet guys.
                    Thanks for the info! The boat has been stored inside a boat house (in fresh water), and yacht club, its entire life. The club has a marina with ethanol free fuel which I assume is where its gotten its gas 98% of its life.

                    I'll inspect them myself next time I'm at the boat. Maybe open and inspect old fuel filter while replacing it. If they look really good, I'll probably still replace any I can readily access. Otherwise, will replace them all.
                    1995 Bayliner Avanti Express 3255
                    Engines: Mercruiser 5.7L 4-57B110HS (0F438410 & 0F438409)
                    Drives: 5-220200HS Bravo Two (0F510804 & 0F510645)

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X