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1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

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  • 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

    New to me. Went out first time and alarm sounded and hot light lit on the tach. Changed out the water pump and tstats and still does the same. Motor runs fine, only alarms above about 3800 RPM. Plenty of water from the telltale. Even after the alarm sounds the water from the telltale is not hot,and there is plenty of flow, it is barely warm. I ran today with the cowl off so as to feel the heads. I could keep my hand on them for a while before they got hot to me. I even unhooked the wires from the temp senders and the alarm still sounds.When I changed out the tstats last week I pulled a small peice of silicone from the opening. Previous owner perhaps had the same problem and changed out the water pump also( it appeard in good condition) I figured that that was the problem but nothing has changed. With a hose hooked up to the wash out and the tstats out I ran the hose at full pressure. I put a 5 gallon bucket to catch the water coming out under each stream of water from each tstat. One bucket filled a bit faster but only by about a 1/2 gallon of water. Before replacing the senders is there a way to test them. Suggestions eagerly awaited and appreciated. I am not so sure that the engine is in fact overheating. I can only test when in the water Because it runs and pumps water fine at low RPM's .

  • #2
    Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

    Way, If you disconnected the wires from the temp senders, and the alarm still sounds, the sender wire is shorting to gound, somewhere. I would trace the wire thru the engine harness and then into the boat wiring harness, until you find it. On my '98 150HP Ocean Runner, I found that hte motor had some kind of short in the boat wiring harness, where it plugged into the engine (port side of motor). A lot of the wires had melted together. In addition, I found a wire that melted off its insulation, where it connected to the trim gauge in the dashboard.

    You might put an ohmmeter on the sendeer wire (battery disconnected), and see if it has a few ohms resistance to ground. Disconnect the Tacho plug before testing.

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    • #3
      Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

      Fuel Restriction ?
      Regards,

      jimmy

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      • #4
        Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

        those motors have also a vacuum switch witch will trigger the same alarm.

        check the temp on the cylinderhead when the alarm go's off. if its above 165 you are overheating.

        if not check for fuel restriction.

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        • #5
          Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

          If pumping the fuel bulb vigorously when the alarm sounds while on plane makes the alarm go away, you are experiencing a fuel restriction. If you are unable to pump the fuel bulb because it's flat, you are experiencing a fuel restriction. If you use an auxiliary fuel supply tank and hose and the alarm goes away, you have a fuel restriction. Are the new stats oriented correctly? Have you backflushed using the telltale adaptor and garden hose?
          ACTA NON VERBA​

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          • #6
            Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

            Love those Giants. What do you mean oriented on the Tstats?Backflushed for quite a while full hose pressure.
            Last edited by w2much; March 3rd, 2008, 07:42 PM. Reason: Additional info

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            • #7
              Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

              I dont believe you are overheating, yet you have a fuel restriction, or your temp sender wire is shorting to ground. The overheat isnt RPM biased, and would sound no matter what RPM you were at. If it kicked into SLOW, you would have to shut down and re start. Will backing off the RPMs kick the warning buzzer off?

              I would start at the built in tanks vent, ensuring it is free of debris, then look into the anti syphon valve, they are known for sticking in a semi closed position. If those both check out, look into all connections and lengths of fuel line. I would also follow the advice of Chris1956 in testing the temp senders.
              Chris

              Johnson - Evinrude Top Secret Files:

              Proudly Dedicating My Time To Antique And Vintage Style Outboards!

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              • #8
                Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                I can keep it running and the alarm will go off by itself. This only occurs at higher RPM's. The motor does not slow automatically when the alarm sounds, I back off on the throttle. The temp light on the tach goes on though. I too am now leaning toward fuel restriction, except that the temp light and alarm go on. Again the motor does not slow down by itself.

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                • #9
                  Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                  Did you follow Chris1956's advice by unplugging the temp senders?
                  Chris

                  Johnson - Evinrude Top Secret Files:

                  Proudly Dedicating My Time To Antique And Vintage Style Outboards!

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                  • #10
                    Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                    I did unplug them then ran the engine again to about 3800RPM, the alarm went off again. I did not unplug both of them at the same time though. I was hoping it would be one or the other of the senders, .

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                    • #11
                      Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                      The next time the horn sounds off, take a quick look at the primer bulb to see if it looks a liitle soft. That is usually a good indication of where the fuel restriction is. If the bulb is normal, give it a steady squeeze to see if the alarm shuts off.

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                      • #12
                        Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                        I will be checking for fuel restrictions. This motor squirts like a cow on a flat rock. Even when the alarm has gone off the water at the telltale was only warm,never hot. Isn't this motor supposed to slow down then be be shut down and restarted after overheating? It has not slowed nor needed to be restarted. In answer to Hightrim: Backing off the throttle and letting it idle will turn of the alarm. In reply to Reeldutch, what vacuum switch and where is it?

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                        • #13
                          Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                          Vacuum switch is under the airbox. The vacuum switch should light the "Check Engine" light on the System Check Tach. Since you have the "Hot" light, I would think the issue is in the temp alarm wiring.

                          It makes sense to test all four sensors, and assure the alarm sounds and the proper light comes on!

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                          • #14
                            Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                            Just got back from work and took out my anti siphon valve. How hard should it be to blow or suck air through. From the tank end it is really difficult to blow. From the engine end really difficult to suck. Suck and push round bearing thing with a pointed object(screwdriver in this case) and nice easy airflow. Can I do without this valve? Thanks for all of your replies.

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                            • #15
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                              Re: 1995 Evinrude 150 HP Ocean Pro Overheat Alarm

                              The anti-siphon valve is tested by the ability to hold a column of liquid at a certain length. If you think it might be bad, you can knock out the ball bearing and spring if all of the fuel lines and the engine are above the level of the fuel tank.

                              Or, if any of the fuel components are below that level, just replace it. The older valves were designed for straight gasoline, plus, they are very much subject to fouling.

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