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  • #16
    Originally posted by Slayze View Post
    Thanks for the replys. I know some would question why? Well I like to do it that's the why. It just makes it that much more enjoyable to me sitting out there fishing while looking at the boat and saying "I did this".
    I have restored a few boats.... not to mention dozens of vehicles, hot-rods, street rods, trucks, etc.

    boats are 3x the work, and 3x the cost

    I would start with a better brand of boat than a mid 80's bayliner.

    Originally posted by Slayze View Post
    Rot seems to be the worst up front. Further back it seems to get better. .
    that is because someone most likely did a deck-over on the boat. trust me, the transom, foam, stringers, bulkheads all long ago rotted. just use the search function on bayliner capri here and you will find about 4 active threads.


    Originally posted by Slayze View Post
    . Seats do need new wood under, but that's the easy part. .
    your seat foam is most likely crumbling and the seat vinyl has long since past the "sell by" date once you start pulling the seats apart, you will realize this.

    Originally posted by Slayze View Post
    I also picked up a 71 C10 I will be restoring to haul it with. Already have a nice tri-coat Red that I will be eventually painting the truck with. Maybe I can get them done around the same time 😉.
    focus on the truck, unlike the boat, that will have resale value when you are done...... then buy a boat for $10k when the truck is done and you will be ahead.


    Originally posted by Slayze View Post

    I will see if I can get a few photos uploaded, but the size limit on uploads is pretty small.
    look at the photo upload tutorial. you need to reduce your photo size to about 25% of its current size to about 400kb

    Originally posted by Slayze View Post
    Again thanks for any and all the help. I have been watching a ton of videos and reading as much as I can. I'm definitely trying to research as much as I can and will be looking at the post you are recommending. I haven't seen a lot of videos of people removing panels under consoles. Usually they are already out or the are doing it without taking them out.

    What about the seat boxes? What's the best way to get those out of there? Can I do so with them being reusable? Also once I get stuff out of the way I will be removing all the wet foam. Already have access to 2lb 2 component foam when it comes time to put it back in.
    not sure of the construction on your particular bayliner. if the console is part of the cap, then so is the front bow seating. if not, you will end up rebuilding most of it. I was lucky with my Avanti where the consoles, bow seating, windshield, etc. was all left intact.

    I know the seat bases in the cockpit are part of the floor. you must document, then destroy all that to get the floor up, then tear out all the foam, stringers, etc. then build all the hull structure, then the floor, then for the seat bases..... build it all back.

    I say this because I want you to have your eyes wide open..... your 80's bayliner was the entry level boat brand with a design life of 15 years max. they were designed to be cheap, get people on the water easily, and to make bayliner profit... https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...at-design-life

    if you intend to rebuild the bayliner, it can be done....and we will all give great advice...... however first understand the costs (I may be light in my estimate). understand the time.... (my simple re-power and gel coat change is coming up on 4 years.)...... and most importantly, get the approval of your wife/GF/significant other.
    Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

    Past Boats
    1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
    2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
    1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

    What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

    Comment


    • #17
      that is the ski locker..... as stated in the other thread.... https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...or-replacement you have a long road ahead of you for the restoration.

      I suggest vs starting multiple threads that you PM a mod to have these threads combined.
      Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

      1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

      Past Boats
      1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
      2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
      1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

      What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Slayze View Post
        So I am taking on a project that I know some of you will think I would be better off getting rid of and buying a newer boat, but i like putting in the work. It makes it that much more enjoyable once it's done. I picked up an 85 bayliner capri 18' at some point someone half *** patched the floor. Over time it worsened. I have been a big car guy over the years. Done body work/painted for 15 years. Never done a floor on a boat though. Anyway I started ripping out the old wood. My question is what is the best way to get the panels out from where the steering wheel is and on the opposite side? Once panels are out dies the upper part just hang there?
        I'm going to go against the tide and say do what makes you happy.
        I'm in the midst of restoring a 80's Campion that, from everything I've seen, was built much like Bayliners and almost any other boat built in the same time period. Will it ever be worth what I put into restoring it?? Never... but that's not why I started the project. I did it because I'd never worked with fiberglass and never owned a boat and wanted to learn from ground up. It has fulfilled all my expectations. If you're doing it to learn, you'll totally enjoy the process. I'd agree that if you're in it to try and make a profit, you'll probably not come close. I don't see many rebuilds going on now that expect to ever sell them for a profit. Do it because you enjoy it and you won't ever be disappointed.
        Good luck, enjoy the process, and I'll be following along your rebuild!
        '89 Campion Allante 185

        Comment


        • #19
          Fwiw too, I'm reusing most of my existing seats and interior. They're not in great shape but good enough for me. I have no visions of a brand new boat... just a much safer one that will last many years. I replaced just the wood in the seats that was very simple and cost less than $50.
          '89 Campion Allante 185

          Comment


          • #20
            Thanks for the replies. I do look at it as some would feel as if its a waste of money, but to me its about the accomplishment of getting it done.I also wanted to give a short update. I have pulled out/cut out most of the floor. Also cut out and removed the two forward and rear facing seat bases. I also removed most of the foam and I am still working on getting all of that out. I have been enjoying the process so far. I also checked the transom with a hammer tap as well as drilling a few small holes to check for rot that I will fill with resin and gelcoat later. Transom seems to me in good shape and I dont think at this time needs to be replaced. I do have a question though as to the foam. When I took the bases out for the seats the base was full of foam. When rebuilding it do I need to make sure that area has foam again? Reason I ask is because I see they sell replacement seats with a plastic base. I plan on redoing all the foam, but wasnt sure if the foam inside of the seat bases was a must or not. Thanks for the input and I have been taking pictures. I just have not had the time to post any as of yet. I will as soon as I can.

            Comment


            • #21
              a hammer tap is not an accurate test. Statistically, the transom is gone as is the stringers.. when you get below the floor you will end up finding mush. Those years Bayliner Capri were built slightly better than those after 1986, but still sub par.

              Put all the flotation you took out back in
              1961 Custom Craft Sea Ray- 1964 Mercury 650. In family since new.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Slayze View Post
                Thanks for the replies. I do look at it as some would feel as if its a waste of money, but to me its about the accomplishment of getting it done.I also wanted to give a short update. I have pulled out/cut out most of the floor. Also cut out and removed the two forward and rear facing seat bases. I also removed most of the foam and I am still working on getting all of that out. I have been enjoying the process so far. I also checked the transom with a hammer tap as well as drilling a few small holes to check for rot that I will fill with resin and gelcoat later. Transom seems to me in good shape and I dont think at this time needs to be replaced. I do have a question though as to the foam. When I took the bases out for the seats the base was full of foam. When rebuilding it do I need to make sure that area has foam again? Reason I ask is because I see they sell replacement seats with a plastic base. I plan on redoing all the foam, but wasnt sure if the foam inside of the seat bases was a must or not. Thanks for the input and I have been taking pictures. I just have not had the time to post any as of yet. I will as soon as I can.
                Hammer test means nothing other than you own a hammer

                if the floor is rotten, 99.999999% chance the stringers and transom is rotten. if yours isnt, buy a lottery ticket as you would have the only bayliner in history with a rotten floor and the stringers and transom were not rotten. Seriously, it would be the only one.

                the foam on a bayliner is structural as well as providing flotation. so yes, you would want to re-foam

                the new plastic bases are taller than what you have, and if I remember correctly from various bayliner capri threads, wont fit. maybe you get lucky.
                Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                Past Boats
                1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                Comment


                • #23
                  I wasn't going to buy the plastic bases. I just knew they sold them and I questioned that people were actually filling them with foam or not. Yes Stringers need replaced and we plan on doing so. As far as the transom I still feel it is not bad. So the hammer test I looked at others doing is a waste of time? I honestly didn't think it would be a true test to check it, but I tried it out anyways. That is also the reason why I drilled some holes. I do still however feel that it is in a good operable condition, but you never know once I work my way back to that area maybe I will find some sort of issues that I will end up redoing the transom as well. Thanks for the info.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Slayze,
                    Go for it and go for the whole enchilada. While you're doing the work replace the transom. You'll be happier with the call.
                    Lots of good advise here. Not easy for sure but VERY doable.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      There is another member here (nolomike) and about a year or so ago did deck and stringers only because his transom "was good" now he has to cut out his work to go back in to fix a wet transom. It's not that much more work now vrs going back in next year

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                      • #26
                        and NOLA is working on a Glastron...... about 400 miles above a bayliner in initial build quality.

                        then again wet transoms and rotten floors happen to all boats with wood and foam. and if there is no wood, its failed fiberglass, failed plexus, and other failings within a production boat hull.
                        Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                        1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                        Past Boats
                        1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                        2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                        1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                        What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          So upon further inspection the transom will need replaced/fixed. So I will do that as well at some point.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Yes yes...it's the right thing to do. Cool!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Slayze View Post
                              So upon further inspection the transom will need replaced/fixed. So I will do that as well at some point.
                              I also hoped that my transom was spared even though my floor and stringers were mush. A lot of the first part that I chiseled was actually pretty dry I wondered if I'd wish I hadn't started the process... but the other half, and mostly the inner center towards the outer hull, was wet and rotted. You won't be sorry that since you've gone to all the trouble to replace the other wood in the boat, you know the transom is new as well.
                              '89 Campion Allante 185

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Sign up today
                                I can't believe the person I got it from was actually using the boat still. Thanks for the positive replies. Now to research on how to get this motor out lol.

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