Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1976 Ebko Surfmaster, long history and starting a minor restoration

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1976 Ebko Surfmaster, long history and starting a minor restoration

    Hi everyone! Just found this forum after re-acquiring a boat that has been in my family since it was built in 1976. In the late 1960s, my grandparents bought a cabin in a little hamlet called Heeney, on the shores of Green Mountain Reservoir near Silverthorne, Colorado. It's a quirky little place, made up of about 100 small cabins, and was famous in the 70s and 80s for the Heeney Tick Festival, which included a parade, the crowning of the Tick Queen, and the occasional drowning of a drunk person trying to swim across the lake.

    My grandfather purchased this boat from Corbin Marine in Englewood, Colorado in 1976, and it was named after my grandma Dorothy... Dot's Yot. My parents inherited the cabin (and boat) in the 90s, and I've been the caretaker of both ever since. Unfortunately, we had to sell the cabin about 5 years ago, though my grandfather had a gentleman's agreement with a neighbor who had a garage, and the boat remained in that garage up until last week.

    I had always intended on towing the boat home and fixing it up, but hadn't even checked on it in 3 or 4 years. I drove up recently to make sure it was still there, and to my surprise, saw it parked in a neighbor's yard with a for sale sign on it! *gasp* Apparently the gentleman's agreement my grandfather had with the neighbor expired when they both passed away, and the grandchildren of the neighbor who inherited their cabin didn't even know who the boat belonged to, and assumed it was abandoned. Luckily when I called the number on the sign, the "seller" picked up and was more than happy to return it to the original owner.

    The trailer was registered in 1976 when the boat was towed from Englewood to the cabin, but hadn't left Heeney in 42 years. I didn't bother to re-register the trailer before I drove it 60 miles to my house, and just hoped the State Patrol would have a sense of humor that my plates were a wee bit expired (42 years expired). Got lucky though, and wasn't pulled over!

  • #2
    So now the boat is home, and I started digging into it a bit. I put water muffs on it and was surprised that it fired right up, and sounded amazing. I think the guy trying to sell it did some work to make it run, he must have at least charged the battery. The last time I had it on the water about 8 years ago, I came into our dock and threw it in reverse to slow down, but reverse was kaput. A slow speed crash into the dock was how Dot’s Yot ended its run on Green Mountain Reservoir. So I know that needs to be repaired, and here are some of the other things I’m starting to investigate on the forums, and would love any advice, tips, and tricks for how to tackle this mild restoration.
    • Reverse: Talked to a local marine shop, and they said to see if it will go into reverse manually to see if it’s a cable problem, but I’m not quite sure how to do that. I see where there are 2 different rods that the cables engage, and I’m a little bit engine savvy, but just enough to be dangerous.
    • Steering is very tight: I remember my grandfather always fussing with the steering to try and loosen it up, but as far as I know, it’s just always been hard to turn. Maybe that’s normal for vintage outboards?
    • Paint: I remember when I was kid admiring the amount of glitter and sparkle in the baby blue paint, but the boat was probably outside under punishing sun and brutal winters for 20-25 years of its life. The gel coat (or clear coat?) over the sparkle is completely gone, and you can almost pluck out individual pieces of glitter. I’m pretty good with an HVLP spray gun, and have repainted a couple old Schwinn bikes and a 1974 snowmobile to nearly perfect finishes, but I don’t know how to get that much glitter into the paint. I’ve been reading up on gel coats, and it sounds like they can be sprayed as well, but I’d love any advice on how to repaint at least the upper portion and interior that has the blue color. The below water portion of the hull is off-white and has very few dings, seems like the gel coat is still acceptable there. But I’m not against respraying the whole thing.
    • Carpet and upholstery: There’s a long fabric-upholstered trim piece that runs the length of the cabin that I’ve removed and will build new wood backing and foam for, and find a local upholstery shop to recover them. The seats are still really nice, I think my grandfather re-upholstered them in the early 90s. But I still want to re-do them just to have a fresh start. Again, I’d probably have an upholstery shop to redo the seats, unless there’s miraculously a place that sells 70's boat interior kits? The carpet is also in decent shape, but I’m still planning to remove it to clean underneath, and check for cracks or soft spots in the deck. I’ve done a lot of fiberglass work so I can handle any of those repairs that might be needed.
    • The canopy is also in decent shape, but if those are still somewhat universal and available, I might look at replacing the frame and fabric, and if the snap locations have to change, I can fill in the old snap holes and drill in new ones.

    I think that about sums up the story of Dot’s Yot! Looking forward to getting this restoration off the ground/water, and I’m really excited to be back into Yotting!

    I'll post photos soon.

    Comment


    • #3

      Comment


      • #4

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome aboard, Dot's son(?)!!

          What a great boat - is it a re-badged MFG? The interior looks pristine - I like that retro-look, & I bet that if you were to fine sand/compound/polish the hull, it would shine-up looking like new. Spraying gelcoat will require a bunch of buffing afterwards, so if you like to glitter look, I'd say try restoring what you have.

          You're boat's a beauty... Good luck!!
          My 1984 Sea Ray Seville project boat

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks! I'll try restoring part of the existing glitter, but it's pretty rough. It photographs well, but it's very dull and like a 60 grit sandpaper.

            I don't believe it's rebadged, I have a pretty amazing folder of provenance including original Evinrude registration, receipt for the trailer, and all the documents say Ebko Surfmaster 1700. Fairly certain it was purchased new in '76. But I have read up on Ebko a little, and I think they were part of another company called Phillips (maybe?) and were based in Hastings, Nebraska.

            -Dot's grandson, Sam

            Comment


            • #7
              Good News is...She's a Beaut!!! Bad News is...If you want the Blue Sparkles back, you'll need to sand All the old GelCoat Flake off and re-Shoot it. I wouldn't Touch the interior except maybe new Carpet. Those old Evinrudes are tough motors and should be easy to get running like new.
              I'll be tagging along for this one!!!
              1961 Lonestar Flamingo - SPLASHED...Kinda!!
              Fabricating Decks, Stringers, and Transoms
              Paint Your Boat with Tractor Paint...Say What!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                little trick. If it looks good when you get it good and wet, you can lay a few coats of clear coat ( urethane will work ) and it will bring it back to some degree. YMMV
                1961 Custom Craft Sea Ray- 1964 Mercury 650. In family since new.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If there’s room in Dots Yot I’d like to tag along !
                  ‘Welcome aboard !
                  ---------------------------------------------------------------------
                  '64 MFG Rebuild
                  MFG forum thread https://forums.iboats.com/mfg/64-edin...ay-524708.html
                  https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ve-the-manatee
                  https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...at-restoration

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by matt167 View Post
                    little trick. If it looks good when you get it good and wet, you can lay a few coats of clear coat ( urethane will work ) and it will bring it back to some degree. YMMV
                    Great idea, I'll give that a shot. I'm used to, and actually enjoy detailing cars to immaculate condition, maybe a good polish and buff combined with new clear would be all it really needs. And about the right amount of work I want to bite off for this project. When I learned how to wet sand clear coat, it really stepped up my paint spraying game, and that could get rid of the roughness. Then it's also still somewhat original, which I like. If it ain't broke, and still looks sorta good with a nice patina... why fix it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sphelps View Post
                      If there’s room in Dots Yot I’d like to tag along !
                      ‘Welcome aboard !
                      You bet! I don't know what the max capacity is, but there's seating for 9 pretty comfortably.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Woodonglass View Post
                        Bad News is...If you want the Blue Sparkles back, you'll need to sand All the old GelCoat Flake off and re-Shoot it.
                        That's what I was planning, but now I'm rethinking how much work I want to put into the paint. The carpet will be easy, and give me a chance to inspect more, but the seats really aren't that bad. Only problem is the rear seat plywood boxes are trashed under the pretty vinyl. They have a fascinating double hinge system that lets you flip the seat bottom out and up. I can't tell if that's a common thing, or something my grandpa came up with (it looks pretty homemade). And he was certainly a tinker-er and fix-it man. He once decided he didn't need to go to the dentist for a crown that fell out, and super glued it back in himself.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think these are definitely due for re-upholstering though. Just a little fade where the throttle goes!

                          Assuming I should at least be using marine grade plywood for any necessary wood parts? I'm probably making a new dashboard (whatever it's called where the gauges are mounted) and glove box cover, maybe using walnut with an epoxy coating. And just a little danish oil and poly on the wood steering wheel, it has a perfect amount of patina and the chrome REALLY cleaned up.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Steering wheel just needs a little teak oil, good as new. Nice boat!
                            Most times I'm wrong, Most times I stand corrected..But...Sometimes I'm right.
                            1983 SportCraft Deep V OSFF 222 Cuddy Rehab
                            https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ddy-walkaround
                            https://forums.iboats.com/forum/engin...-new-fuel-pump
                            www.flotationfoamsolutions.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              Originally posted by Dot's Yot View Post

                              That's what I was planning, but now I'm rethinking how much work I want to put into the paint. The carpet will be easy, and give me a chance to inspect more, but the seats really aren't that bad. Only problem is the rear seat plywood boxes are trashed under the pretty vinyl. They have a fascinating double hinge system that lets you flip the seat bottom out and up. I can't tell if that's a common thing, or something my grandpa came up with (it looks pretty homemade). And he was certainly a tinker-er and fix-it man. He once decided he didn't need to go to the dentist for a crown that fell out, and super glued it back in himself.
                              Re-doing the seat bases is an easy straight forward job. Build it back like you found it!! Sounds like your Dad would have been a welcome member on this forum
                              1961 Lonestar Flamingo - SPLASHED...Kinda!!
                              Fabricating Decks, Stringers, and Transoms
                              Paint Your Boat with Tractor Paint...Say What!!!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X