Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Grinding down tabbing from hull - how much to grind out?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grinding down tabbing from hull - how much to grind out?

    Hey all,

    I have read in other forums/areas about 2 separate disciplines when it comes to replacing stringers... and grinding the old glass out.

    I have seen that it is OK to leave a little glass left (maybe up to an inch) so you know where to align the new stringer...
    I have also seen some people say they have ground out all the old glass right to the hull...

    This may just come down to personal preference as well - as long as your new stringer has good hull contact and the old tabbing does not get in the way?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	glass tabbing 1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	132.6 KB
ID:	10739323Click image for larger version

Name:	glass tabbing 2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	121.8 KB
ID:	10739324

    Thanks!

    ND

  • #2
    You need to grind enough to get good adhesion when you tab in your new stringers so lots more.
    i ground out all the old tabbing when I was at that point on my build.

    Comment


    • #3
      My advice just make it flat enough it doesn't interfere When your doing the new tabbing. There was nothing under the stinger. Tabbing to each side. Once the 2 sides are flat with no valley between them done.
      Dance with the waves,
      move with the sea.
      Let the rhythm of the water
      set your soul free.

      1987 Four Winns 170 Horizon.

      Comment


      • #4
        When you see the ground, you've gone too far.
        I left a "cup" for the new stringers to sit in. Roughed up around it with grinder for tabs. On one boat I filled the cup with peanut butter, bedded the stringers, then used the excess that squeezed out and my finger(gloved) to create the fillet. Then tabbed. On another I did the same but used pl premium instead of peanut butter. Was much faster and easier.

        Comment


        • #5
          In MY opinion, ther is no one way only doing this. There is no right way and wrong way. I ground my entire hull because I had hull breaches that I wanted to remove and then CSM the entire hull before installing any stringers. So I ground every thing basically flat and smooth. Just remember don't cut corners if you plan to make this boat yours for a long time after the rebuild. JMHO
          Tom Boy Boat Project https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat...s-what-trailer
          Rebuilt trailer project https://forums.iboats.com/forum/gener...r-back-to-life
          '76 40 HP Johnson rebuild https://forums.iboats.com/forum/engin...mplete-rebuild
          Minn Kota 599 Project https://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...ta-599-project

          Comment


          • #6
            I could still "see" where the stringers sat and where they were originally on the hull even with all the tabbing ground and gone. For me it would have been better if I had left a little lip where the DECK was tabbed in and then grind that out lastly when needed. I'm sure each boat is different but I've seen many that have a "shadow" of where the stringers were on the hull even when they've been all ground out so no real need to leave a lip imo.
            '89 Campion Allante 185

            Comment


            • #7
              Sign up today
              IMHO when you see a distinct Pink or salmon color your down to good glass. That's far enough
              1961 Lonestar Flamingo - SPLASHED...Kinda!!
              Fabricating Decks, Stringers, and Transoms
              Paint Your Boat with Tractor Paint...Say What!!!

              Comment

              Working...
              X