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Brazing Aluminum Gone Wrong | 14' Gregor Hull Repair **HELP**

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  • Brazing Aluminum Gone Wrong | 14' Gregor Hull Repair **HELP**

    Recently purchased a 14' gregor for a great deal with a running 15hp evinrude. After further inspection i found a hairline crack that didn't leak, but im weird and wanted seal it. I mistakenly tried brazing that hairline crack and BLEW a fat whole through the hull using too high of heat, after research there are plenty of products to seal such tiny cracks. RIp. But now im here. After speaking with a local welder with lots of experience in aluminum welding he suggested i patch the hole with another piece of the same aluminum and just rivet and seal it instead of welding. So here are some photos as well as a "mockup" if you will. Nothing has been done yet other than me shaping the patch piece of aluminum to fit the keel.

    I have a .025 11x18" aluminum sheet that i want to rivet with aluminum closed end 3/16" rivets w/ washers spaced 1" apart. I want to seal each rivet and fill the cavity between the hull and patch with 3m 5200. The boat with be used in the socal bays and lakes. Note: the aluminum is thin enough to shape with a rubber mallet, lots of elbow grease tho.

    Is this the best solution for such a crappy problem? If the hull lasted 3 years, id be stoked

  • #2
    Yes that will work fine.

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    • #3
      take the boat to a competent welder and spend the $50. if you cant find a welder, go to your local radiator repair shop (they weld aluminum)
      Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

      1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

      Past Boats
      1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
      2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
      1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

      What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

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      • #4
        They actually sell some welding rods for aluminum that you can use with a propane torch and seal that up. While I have never used such rods, that would be a good try to fill in the hole. Also, if you do try to weld it with those rods, place a piece of steel sheet behind it so the filling effort won't go any further. The steel will not weld to the aluminum and help keep the aluminum in place as you fill it in. JMHO
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        • #5
          I've done a fair amount of welding structural aluminum. Argon gas shielding is the only workable method. TIG or spool gun MIG. I'm not skilled enough to weld something this thin w/o burning a larger wound.

          Perl Scott D, a prop shop is also equipped to weld this.
          '96 Larson 174 SEI BR. 4.3LX 4 bbl Weber s/n 0F786604. Alpha One Gen II s/n 0F709315

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gm280 View Post
            They actually sell some welding rods for aluminum that you can use with a propane torch and seal that up. While I have never used such rods, that would be a good try to fill in the hole. Also, if you do try to weld it with those rods, place a piece of steel sheet behind it so the filling effort won't go any further. The steel will not weld to the aluminum and help keep the aluminum in place as you fill it in. JMHO
            I tried those. On thin aluminum, even that amount of heat was enough to warp it badly. I will never use them again on a boat.
            - Eric

            Somers, WI

            Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

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            • #7
              I agree with Scott Danforth ... If a welder recommended you don't repair the aluminum, then I'd hesitate to call him a welder. Should be a fairly easy fix by a competent welder. Get it fixed right and never worry about it leaking.
              1996 Bayliner Capri 2050 40th Anniv Edition - 5.7 Merc - UNDER CONSTRUCTION

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              • #8
                Originally posted by oldrem View Post

                I tried those. On thin aluminum, even that amount of heat was enough to warp it badly. I will never use them again on a boat.
                you have to hammer and dolly the warpage out. just like doing body work.

                a good welder will leave it ready to paint without needing fairing (putty)
                Cheesehead boating the Gulf Coast of FLA 27.51° N, 82.53° W

                1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - https://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                Past Boats
                1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheeseheads in Paradise"
                1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scott Danforth View Post

                  you have to hammer and dolly the warpage out. just like doing body work.

                  a good welder will leave it ready to paint without needing fairing (putty)
                  Yes, that's what I ended up doing. For the tough stuff I took it to a pro.
                  - Eric

                  Somers, WI

                  Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you all so much for replying! If I were to rivet instead of weld, what gauge aluminum sheet should I use?

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                    • #11
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                      I think most aluminum boats are 16 gauge, so should be good enough for the patch.
                      - Eric

                      Somers, WI

                      Old enough to know better - but crazy enough to try anyway

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