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  1. #1
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Liquid in tractor tires

    Whatever the liquid they use in tractor tires for weight is seeping out around my rim.
    What can be done to stop this?


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  2. #2
    Moderator JB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    That's just water in my tractor, Spinner.

    I get mesquite thorns in them sometimes and they lose some. I just put an adapter I made on the outdoor faucet and blow 'em up again. Gotta be careful not to overinflate.

    Of course, maybe up thea in the frozen nawth of Kanetucky they use antifreeze.

  3. #3
    Admiral
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I got tired of fixing leaks due to mesquite thorns and such and had the fronts on our Kubota foam filled.Added some weight as well as solved the frequent flat problems.Not real cheap though.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Most of the time the fluid in tractor tires is a calcium chloride mix. Calcium chloride is a salt just like sodium chloride and the addition of it to the water not only lowers it's freezing point, but makes any leak corrosive. Most older rims that I have seen that had fluid filles tubes on them for any length of time were either very rusty or rusted out.

    Most all of those who run fluid in my part of the country has seepage due to tiny thorn or wiregrass cuts.

    Sometimes wheelweights are not feasible and the tires will need to be fluid filled, but I would recommend wheel weights if they can be found. One local has made them from Quickcrete and pieces of pipe and they work well.

    My father forgot to put the calcium chloride back into one tire one year after he had "teporarily" filled it with straight water. Can you imagine his surprise when he went to use the tractor after the first hard freeze only to discover that the water in the tube had frozen?

  5. #5
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    This one is coming out around the rim.
    I might check the foam stuff.
    Do tractor dealers handle that also?


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  6. #6
    Moderator aspeck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Most around here do. It is not cheap, will make for a rougher ride, but it saves a lot in flat repair time!
    Rules of Repair:
    1. If it ain't broke, give me a hammer, it will be!
    2. You only need 2 tools in life - WD-40 and Duct Tape. If it doesn't move, and it should, use WD-40. If it moves, and it shouldn't, use Duct Tape!
    3. If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem.


  7. #7
    Admiral SS MAYFLOAT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    If its leaking around the bead, its a good indication that the calcium has deterioted the rubber and rim. On tires that use calcium for weight, sometimes it will seep into to bead and corrode the wire to.

    We used the stuff a lot on the farm I worked at as a kid. I had an 1948 Bolens Husky made by FMC. It had fluid in them. One of the rear tires had a leak on the bead like yours. It was so bad we had to cut the tire off the rim. The bead area on the rim was corroded and had pits going thru and thru. We couldn't find a rim, so we cut the center out of the old rim and welded it into a good rim of the same size. We found painting the inside of the rim with epoxy paint helped reduce the corrosion. Sometimes around the valve stem is areas that usually show leakeage and corrosion also.

    If it is a full size rear tire and full, be very careful. Had one farm worker who dropped on on my foot one time. One of the most painful things that can happen to a person. Probably like having your foot in a bear trap. A wrecker boom is the way to go to handle the big tires. Good luck Lester and please be careful.

    BTW, I think Tractor Supply carries the fluid you need to put back in. Calcium won't freeze and has a heavier content than that of water.
    BEER........Helping ugly people find true Love since 1862

  8. #8
    Chief Petty Officer newbie4life's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Just bought a tractor last year (Case DX45). Ordered dual rear weights (4 - 125 lb), and single fronts(2 -45 lb). Still too light in the rear, so took it to the tire shop to have fluid put in (480lbs -- A SIDE!!!!) Makes a huge difference, but having restored several tractors (Farmall M, H, and 2 cubs), I know what happens to the rims if there's ever a leak. Just destroys them.

    That being said, when we took it to the tire shop, we learned that there wasn't a tube installed in the new tractor's tires. In fact, most of them are that way. Get this... tire shop guy 'recommended' that we install a tube -- after making fun of him, he says 'you'd be surprised how many idiots don't want a tube because it's an extra $35 a tire.'

    Ever buy a rim?

  9. #9
    Moderator Bob_VT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    You probably have a leak in the tube. 90% + use tubes inside tires even if they are tubeless when they are filled. Regardless..... it will have to be broken down and refilled. Calcium Chloride is the common additive and it is highly corrosive so make sure the wheel/tire are washed (and scrubbed) completely before it is refilled. If the leak is in a front wheel have both sides refilled. The fronts are usually stressed just by turning and cornering...... if it is a rear wheeel just have the fill checked on the other side.

    Chances are if the reason you have a leak is from the age of the initial fill ..... the others might be soon to follow.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I don't know about the Tractor Supply here, but the Farmers Co-Op only uses methanol/water mix in tires. It's not as heavy, but not as corrosive either.

  11. #11
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I don't need the weight as such cause I don't use a front end loader or anything.
    Just wondering the best route to go.
    Put tubes in them, they are tubeless right now.
    And it is the rear tire.


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  12. #12
    Moderator Bondo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Just wondering the best route to go.
    Ayuh,..... The Absolute Best way to go is with Tubes,+ an Antifreeze mix......

    I'd probaly Not go with just air in the tires,....
    Even without a frontend loader, tractors are notoriously unstable,+ tractionless without some sort of Weight at the rear tires.......

    Around here,... The Tire Shops will still do the Calcium fills, or if you're willing to spend the extra cash,...
    Antifreeze is Better,..... No Rotten rims with it......
    Any Grease is Better,..... Than No Grease at All.......

  13. #13
    Captain Kenneth Brown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I have a Mahindra 5500 (54 hp) that has 14.9X28's on the rear. They are filled with water and antifreeze even though we get very little freezing our way. Its more for corrosion protection than freezing. Weight on a tractors drive tires are one of the best things you can do, the more weight the better.
    It is a sign of strength, not of weakness, to admit you don't have all the answers. John P. Loughbrane

  14. #14
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Anyone heard of rim guard?
    Says it's better than the calcium stuff and won't hurt the rims/tires.
    "rimguard.biz"


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  15. #15
    Lieutenant Commander bjcsc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Yeah, rimguard is what most people use around here. It's beet juice. Non-corrosive (unlike calcium chloride, but just as heavy), non-polluting/deadly to critters (unlike antifreeze). Many people also use windshield washing fluid (methanol/water). If you get a leak in a CaCL filled tire nothing (I mean nothing) will grow on that ground for a long time...

    Whether or not to load the tires really depends on your tractor(?) and what you're doing with it. If you're plowing, or otherwise engaging the earth, you may need the weight. If not, you may just be wasting fuel and putting more stress on the driveline components. So, what do you have and what do you use it for?
    Full Gallop
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  16. #16
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Kubota 7510 and the most I do with it is put a tiller on and a bush hog 2 times a season for each.


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  17. #17
    Captain Kenneth Brown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I guess for those applications the fluid fill is not necc, maybe for the tiller though... That tractor is about 20-22 hp and 4 wd right? Its a subcompact used in golf courses, nurserys, and by rednecks who just gotta have mo powwwwwer!! I would say pull the tire and have a tube installed. Your looking at less than 20 for the tube and probably about 10 to have it put in. Just pull the tire and take it to the local yokal.
    It is a sign of strength, not of weakness, to admit you don't have all the answers. John P. Loughbrane

  18. #18
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Yea, mow about 12 acres and like I said, hook the tiller 2 times a year and the bush hog also 2 times a year so I don't think I need the extra weight but the dealer put that stuff in before I bought it new.


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  19. #19
    Lieutenant Commander bjcsc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Considering your use, I wouldn't run loaded tires if I were you. Save some diesel and have it taken out. Shop around for some front suitcase weights (or make some) and use those if you need front weight to pick up the cutter or tiller. Then you can take them off when you don't need them and save fuel/wear and tear.

    My tractor had to go in for warranty work today. The radiator sprang a leak in the middle of mowing ~10acres. Gotta love machines!
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  20. #20
    Captain Kenneth Brown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    How odd. Yesterday I pulled the FEL off my baby cuz its gonna be going to the shop too. 6 months out of warrenty and my ps pump is going bad. If I keep the revs up it will work fine. Drop to idle and king kong couldn't turn it. I've bleed it several times hoping there was air in the lines but no luck...
    It is a sign of strength, not of weakness, to admit you don't have all the answers. John P. Loughbrane

  21. #21
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Yep, dealer said that it needed to be taken apart and cleaned up real good and insert a tube in it.
    I do have the suitcase weights for the front that I use with the tiller sometimes.


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  22. #22
    Chief Petty Officer Caveman Charlie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Although there not as easy to find as they used to be you can add weights to your rear rims. A lot of older tractors had them. They were round and bolted to the hub part of the rim. Much better to use them then that D*mmed calcium chloride that rusts out the rims. Leave that stuff out and add weight some other way. It's expensive anyway.

  23. #23
    Lieutenant Commander wildmaninal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    We put a front end loader on my father's tractor and needed a counter weight for the 3 point hitch so we built a weight using a 55 gallon plastic drum, 2 steel plates, re-barb rod, cement and a category 2 tow bar. We cut the barrel down a little bit drilled 1" holes in each side of the barrel and managed to get the category 2 bar down in the barrel were the pins stuck out of the 1" holes. Drilled holes in 2 steel plates 2 to slide the rods through and 1 to attach the adjustment arm to. We stood the plates on the tow bar and welded them to it. With the rods and all in place we poored the cement in the barrel and let it sit of course. This turned out to be a pretty good counter weight.

    The wheel weights can be hard to find just depends on your make and model of tractor. We tried to find some for my father's 2150 John Deere and lord they were high priced. You might be able to find the weights at you local tractor dealer.

  24. #24
    Honorary Moderator Emeritus SpinnerBait_Nut's Avatar
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    I am getting the CC out and putting tubes in.
    Like I said, I do have some suitcase weights for the front and I don't need any weight for the rear cause when I am on it there is plenty there.


    "JUST KEEP ON, KEEPING ON"
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Liquid in tractor tires

    Don't tell nobody but guess where the used motor oil on the farm went?
    Yep, right into the tractor tires. No freezing and no corrosion, EVER.
    I can't ever recall a gushing leak however.

    Also in the late 60's my Dad had weight installed inside the tubeless tires of his new garden tractor. Get this....powdered LEAD. Looked like pink flour, the guy broke the bead and shoveled it in all the while the wind blowing thru the shop and no masks, etc. anywhere.

    Probaly can't find any now at any price.

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