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Hey, watch this...

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  • Hey, watch this...

    When I was in Junior High we loved on lake Belton. My dad had a big ol' 'toon and we fished out of it regularly. One of his favorite spots was one he called the tree. It was just a big dead tree off the shore of Military Mountain (more of a hill really). We would tie up to the tree and fish all night, you never knew what you were going to catch; whites, crappie, catfish, they all cam through there.

    On one side we were bordered by the shore of Military Mountain and jutting off was a large sand bar, everyone just called it The Sand Bar. During the day people would beach their boats on the sand bar and swim and stuff, but the sand bar wasn't out of the water, it was probably 12-18 inches under the surface.

    One night while tied up to the tree a boat showed up in the area having a little fun. It sounded like a boat full of kids (although older than me at the time), skiing, laughing and playing music. They had been out there long enough to loose my attention, I was fishing after all.

    A little bit later, dad snaps me out of my zen-like fishing state and says:
    Hey, watch this!
    He grabs the Q-Beam spot light and points it towards the boat in the lake (but didn't turn it on yet), it sounds like it is heading our way pretty fast. And that's about the time they hit the sand bar.

    I will never forget the sound that boat made striking the sand bar that night. The night was still and quiet, with this boat being the only one under power for what seemed like miles. It sounded like the boat let out a warning scream and then a massive shudder and then a death groan; all at the same time.

    Dad flicked on the Q-Beam. At least two of them were in the water, standing in about 2 feet of water actually. There was a lot of confusion, cursing and cranking. After a few minutes it was painfully obvious that they were in need of help, the boat would not start, it might be taking on water and they were at their wits end.

    So we hauled anchor and idled over to see if we could give them a hand.

    They were going so fast they actually made it across the sand bar, the hull did anyway, the outdrive was completely shot and the transom was in pieces, but they weren't taking on water. So they agreed to a tow in from Dad.

    Turns out this was a brand new deck boat. They guy driving, really a kid, but older than me, had taken it off the show room floor of his Dad's boat dealership in Belton for a weekend (or night) of fun on the lake. I don't know if his Dad knew or not, I don't think that came up. Anyway, Dad hooked them up and we towed them all the way to Cedar Ridge Park where they were camped for the weekend.

    We went back to the tree and fished all night. In the morning we walked the sand bar to see where they hit. Let me tell you this, it was scary the damage that was done by that boat to the sand bar, I was amazed really. As a 13 or 14 year old kid it really burned into my brain the damage a boat can do at speed. It seemed like there was a ditch that had been dug across about a 10 foot section of sand bar, at least 20 inches wide. We didn't find any parts of the boat, but that damage stuck with me forever.

    I learned a lot from my Dad about helping people on the water, or in general really. He was always ready to stop what he was doing to help those in need, especially on the water though.

    He died a few years ago, but he lives on in me and my son. The lessons and skills he taught me will go on for generations. And I guess, that is the true legacy of a man; passing on what you know to the next generation.
    Who is John Galt?

  • #2
    "He died a few years ago, but he lives on in me and my son. The lessons and skills he taught me will go on for generations. And I guess, that is the true legacy of a man; passing on what you know to the next generation."

    Salute!
    _

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Maclin View Post
      "He died a few years ago, but he lives on in me and my son. The lessons and skills he taught me will go on for generations. And I guess, that is the true legacy of a man; passing on what you know to the next generation."

      Salute!
      ^^+1

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      • #4
        Good stories and awesome that your dad passed those characteristics down

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        • #5
          I learned that helping spirit on the waterways with my Grandfather. Your story just brought back so many memories, Thank You!
          '47 18' CC Utility "Knock On Wood"
          Various Evinrude powered Pontoons all named "Floosy"

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          • #6
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            I learned a lot from my Dad about helping people on the water, or in general really. He was always ready to stop what he was doing to help those in need, especially on the water though.

            He died a few years ago, but he lives on in me and my son. The lessons and skills he taught me will go on for generations. And I guess, that is the true legacy of a man; passing on what you know to the next generation.[/QUOTE]

            Great story. Not everyone was or is blessed enough to have a Father like you did. Yes it's your turn to pass it on, you go my Man.
            Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

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