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Single Ski w/adjustable bindings - beginner level

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  • Single Ski w/adjustable bindings - beginner level

    I recently purchased a boat, and me and my kids (young adults) want to wake board and ski. I have not skied for 5+ years, and was never advanced. My kids 19 yr old son / 21 yr old daughter have never skied. But have wake boarded. My son wants to learn to single ski.
    So I would like to find a decent entry level ski, with adjustable bindings. I like the strap in type on both feet. But need to fit mens 10 to 12 at least. Maybe even go smaller, but my son and I are about a size 11.

    Any advise on where to get, and what type? None of us will compete or anything. Just want some water fun!!
    thx
    Frank

  • #2
    Connelly Outlaw, Radar P6 and HO Freeride are good skis these days for what you want. I would do an adjustable rear toe plate if you just learning. An easy up rope (deep V) will help too.
    2003 Malibu Sunsetter LXI, Acme 525, Radar P6 ski

    (I still like to help with Force outboards !)

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    • #3
      How great a weight range do you cover? That would indicate ski length but 67-68" are pretty standard. Agree with above options.

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      • #4
        Me and my son, so 160lbs to 180lbs and about 6foot tall for both of us. So large size bindings and I am guessing 67" ski.

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        • #5
          Another vote for the Deep-V, easy up rope. I couldn't pry that outta the other halfs hands if she was asleep, passed out etc. She loves that thing!
          2007 Tahoe Q6, Mercruiser 4.3L MPI

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          • #6
            Originally posted by malibu3105 View Post
            Me and my son, so 160lbs to 180lbs and about 6foot tall for both of us. So large size bindings and I am guessing 67" ski.
            67 may be OK, but your 160lb kid may bob around a bit on a wider ski like a P6. I've got a 67 Senate and a 67 P6. I bought the P6 for my 6ft 1" kid and he weighs around 165, which is really a bit light for his 67 P6. (I'm 6ft 175lbs and the 67 Senate is about perfect)
            2012 Malibu VTX 5.7 Monsoon 350
            2009 Ram CC 5.7 Hemi

            www.oldjeep.com

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            • #7
              I have that deep V rope, I love them.

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              • #8
                Sign up today
                Last year was my return to slalom skiing. I started with a 67" HO combo set... slip in bindings.

                Could not get up.

                Purchased a Connelly MidSX... a wide ski designed for old big guys like me (5'10, 200+ lbs).

                Could not get up.

                Spent most of the season messing with my technique (all documented in my "middle age" thread - but one night switched back to the combo, and tried and easy up rope, and suddenly I was up. It was definitely a technique thing, compounded by the short ski for a big guy.

                I did get bored quickly with the combo, so I went to a local shop, and bought a lightly used HO Mach 1 on a swap day... had about $50 in it, but had to put bindings on it. I bought nice, well fitting HO bindings (and I did use an adjustable toe plate). I figured that I could always move the bindings to a new ski if the HO didnt work out, but it has been a ton of fun.

                For what it is worth, my thoughts are:
                1. Dont overthink the equipment (ski, and bindings) except for sizing based upon size and weight. It matters, but in the bigger scheme of things the ski didnt matter as much for me as technique. Get a good ski with bindings that are easy to get on and off. You will wear yourself out struggling with a harder core competition ski on a deepwater start.

                2. Get the easy up rope. Just do it. It really does help

                3. Have an experienced driver. A rookie driver will try hard, but when you are working to find your correct technique, it doesnt help to have someone learning to drive at the same time.

                4. Be. Patient. It will come. I spent almost a year relearning slalom after a 30 year layoff. Almost gave up a few times, but stayed persistent. It finally paid off.

                Cant wait for the season to start.

                Jeff
                1997 Crownline 182 BR
                5.7L Mercruiser Alpha 1

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