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draining logs

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  • draining logs

    how would you get the water out of logs that have no drain in the bottom of them? i was thinking about that while reading the post of whats in your logs?
    maybe modified shop vac hose?


  • #2
    Re: draining logs

    i mean the pontoons not logs or tubes,
    shew i hope no one sees that

    Comment



    • #3
      Re: draining logs

      Do they have water in them?

      Really the only way is to drill holes in the bottom then find the leak and seal them back up which of coarse calls for a welder.

      That is the only way I have ever found to do it, I have never understood the drains in the tubes, it is like they expect them to leak.

      I have heard of sticking a hose in the tube and using a pump but the bung is so small it would have to be a pretty tiny hose.

      You could have the bungs welded on the tubes but it is better to have the leaks fixxed.
      GO IRISH!!!!

      Comment



      • #4
        Re: draining logs

        Originally posted by 5150abf View Post
        That is the only way I have ever found to do it, I have never understood the drains in the tubes, it is like they expect them to leak.
        Guess that's why my Suntracker has them. NYUK NYUK NYUK. Joking aside, the PO had them welded on, and I'd like to punch the welder in the nose. One of the first things I did when I got 'er home was take 'er to my welder. Of the several leaks he fixed some of the worst were around the drains. She still leaks a tiny bit. After a long weekend in the water (docked) I'll drain a cup or so out of each tube, but that doesn't bother me since she lives on a trailer.
        Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
        21' Suntracker(for my girls), 16' Polarkraft MV w/ 25 HP Merc(for me), 14' Odyssey bucket raft, Square stern Ouachita canoe (finally confessed to the admiral) Cute little 2.5 Merc, 16' Purple Mad River Explorer; vice-admiral's boat, but she lets me use it as long as I don't forget it's hers. Blue Hole Sunburst; a piece of history (or a piece of something else if you ask the admiral)

        Comment



        • #5
          Re: draining logs

          On my older toon the plug at the top at the rear was large enough to insert a 3/8" copper tube. I attached it to a small 12v pump for easy water extraction.
          Ray

          Never take instruction from a guy with missing fingers.

          Comment



          • #6
            Re: draining logs

            well this what i am up against, i am assuming the tabs where the molding bolts on is where it is leaking, (when under pressure it whistles) in the front, where it looks like the toons were torpedoed. the air fitting is so you can check for leaks right? and the round plugs on top is how you would drain them? the starboard toon is bone dry, but i siphoned roughly 2 cups of water out of the front drain (as the front is the lowest point)no telling how much more is in there in ice form. now if the toon is bafffled i would still need to drain the back correct

            Comment



            • #7
              Re: draining logs

              The air fitting are multi purpose. They can release pressure, as pressure can build up in hot weather. They also provide a method of pressurizing the tubes for testing after manufacturing. Most tubes are tested at approximately 6 lbs. More can cause catastrophic damage. As to the baffles, they are not always completely sealed between the compartments. In the event of a major puncture they will prevent water from immediately filling the entire tube, allowing you to get to shore. Water will slowly enter the other compartments. On my previous pontoon which had a leak, with a raised bow, I would pump out the water at the rear, wait for more to drain to the rear and pump again, and repeat the procedure 3 or 4 times to get it all out.
              Ray

              Never take instruction from a guy with missing fingers.

              Comment



              • #8
                Re: draining logs

                Some are sealed between compartment and some aren't, Benningtons have sealed compartments so if you get a hole only that section will take water and it always take awhile to convice my new air checkers of this but a hole in the top is worse than a hole in the bottom because it will give air a place to go if there ever is a bottom leak.

                Same as putting a glass in water upside down, no water can get in unless there is a hole at the top.

                Vergil, we use regular dish soap in a spray bottle, Polmolive I think, get a couple 2-3 psi in there and start spraying before long you will see bubbles and know where your leak is.

                You cna get to the front one so I would try to drain it that way if the baffles aren't sealed and once it melt of coarse.
                GO IRISH!!!!

                Comment



                • #9
                  Re: draining logs

                  Vergil, I understand if you want to take this on yourself. That's often the iboater way. However, if cost is the major factor behind your DIY approach I'd just like to point out that you'd be surprised how little a good aluminum welder will charge to pressure test your toons and repair any leaks. Just wanted to throw that out there. Good luck.
                  Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
                  21' Suntracker(for my girls), 16' Polarkraft MV w/ 25 HP Merc(for me), 14' Odyssey bucket raft, Square stern Ouachita canoe (finally confessed to the admiral) Cute little 2.5 Merc, 16' Purple Mad River Explorer; vice-admiral's boat, but she lets me use it as long as I don't forget it's hers. Blue Hole Sunburst; a piece of history (or a piece of something else if you ask the admiral)

                  Comment



                  • #10
                    Re: draining logs

                    Originally posted by lncoop View Post
                    Vergil, I understand if you want to take this on yourself. That's often the iboater way. However, if cost is the major factor behind your DIY approach I'd just like to point out that you'd be surprised how little a good aluminum welder will charge to pressure test your toons and repair any leaks. Just wanted to throw that out there. Good luck.
                    i have found a welder that welds alum. but i dont know if he is skilled enough to tig weld the pontoons i am going to let him repair some of the hand rail pieces and then go from there. (see if he does a good enough job on them)

                    Comment



                    • #11
                      Re: draining logs

                      oh yea ,

                      how would remove jb weld? 1 of the tabs has a little on it, and if i am gonna have it welded it would need removed

                      Comment

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