Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Store Links Mobile - Shop Now

Announcement

Collapse

SITE MAINTENANCE

The iBoats Forums will be down for maintenance starting at 10 AM MST on 12/16/2017. The estimated amount of downtime is 3 hours (we are expected to be back up at 1:00 PM MST). Thanks for being a part of the iBoats community!
See more
See less

New pontoon deck covering

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New pontoon deck covering

    I have done a lot of research on this subject. And I found an old post from a commercial roofer saying he wanted to use rubber roofing material for his decking. He was pretty much ridiculed for this idea , and there was reference made to a rubber door mat on a deck that rotted. I am thinking of doing the same thing, and I fail to realize how this would not work as good or better than Marine vinyl flooring. They both still have to be put down with adhesive, and the argument was that the plywood could not breathe. I am assuming that since both have to be adhered to ?the deck how would the Marine vinyl breathe more than rubber roofing

  • #2
    Assuming we're not sealing the bottom side, how could one material be considered acceptable by industry standards, yet another material applied in the exact same manner is not acceptable, and even ridiculed?

    Comment


    • #3
      By the way, Commercial Rubber Roofing is warranted for 30 years. How could that not be acceptable as a floor covering for a pontoon boat?

      Comment


      • #4
        Also to the naysayers... It has a slick white side intended for exposure to weather as a roof. Flip side is textured, intended to "grab" the glue. It can be installed upside down, with the correct low VOC adhesive and will last as long as a 30-year roof, just installed upside down.

        Comment


        • #5
          Have already tested it, the right adhesive will hold the slick side as well. Not to mention furniture and the side rails will help to hold it down. I welcome any arguments against this, but I have tested this and I know that it will work as well as Marine vinyl, if not better

          Comment


          • #6
            Nothing stays dry when on the water, so the deck covering will prevent any water in the plywood form escaping easily, this can be a problem with many of the vinyl products because some aren't that durable and end up with nicks and cuts after a while. These nicks and cuts allow even more water to get to the wood, then the wood stays wet for a very long time, or just never dries out.

            A thicker more durable coating would hold up better, but any unsealed screw holes or penetrations would still be an issue.

            ​There is no perfect answer for deck coatings, well, at least none that are easily affordable.
            Last edited by ondarvr; August 26th, 2017, 10:31 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Roofs are not intended to be walked on.....they wouldnt survive
              1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - http://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

              Past Boats
              1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
              2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheasheads in Paradise"
              1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

              What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

              Comment


              • #8
                Foot traffic was my first thought as well.

                Second thought, is the "rubber" roofing used on RV roofs is not holding up near as well as advertised - without foot traffic on it.

                Last, after a lot of research, I just used this for my project, mostly due to it's warranty. I wanted vinyl, but I didn't want to have to replace it any time soon. It was the only thing with a warranty to back up it's durability claims. It wasn't cheap by any imagination, but so far, we love it!
                http://www.restorepontoon.com/pontoo...&idcategory=88

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bad idea. Whats missing here is the bottom and edges of the plywood are NOT SEALED. Water will be absorbed into the wood from underneath with no way for it to escape. Heat and sunlight will dry out a carpeted deck. IMHO, with decks lasting 15 to 20 years there is no need to try something different.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bigdee View Post
                    , with decks lasting 15 to 20 years there is no need to try something different.
                    Longer if the carpet is covered in wine, beer and fish slime ....... Based on experience
                    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - http://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                    Past Boats
                    1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                    2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheasheads in Paradise"
                    1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                    What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      An adjuster from my homeowners insurance company and my roofer left a bit ago after inspecting my roof for hail damage. While waiting for the adjuster I questioned the roofer about the use of rubber roofing for the deck of a pontoon. His thoughts were that it would work very well. It is available in 30, 60, and 90 mil and suggested the 90 mil material would be best and definitely NOT the 30 mil.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        To bigdee, EVERYONE recommends not sealing completely...water has to get out somewhere, the bottom side

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Silvertip you are spot on... This material is made by Goodyear and is every bit of 3/32". Really tough stuff. To whoever said roofs are not made to walk on, this material is. It is made to withstand the absolute worst that Mother Nature can dish out for 30 years. And we're worried that it can't stand up to bare feet for 10 or 20 years for the life of the plywood???

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Marine vinyl is Maybe, what, 3/64 of an inch? It may very well hold up for 5 to 10 years however the roofing material that I'm talking about is made to hold up to 30 years. Under the worst of Mother Nature's conditions, people walking on it or not, also, it is every bit of 3/32" thick and will resist punctures scratches and abrasions. It may not be the industry-standard but it is better than anything that is offered for pontoons as of now. Just think about it. It is made to last 30 years under all kinds of conditions

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              Sounds promising.
                              It's your boat and your $$.
                              Go for it and let the naysayers know how well it works.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X