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strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

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  • strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

    What materials can be applied
    to underside and/or front of PVC inflatable so as to make it more resistant to sharp rocks (when pulling the boat onto shore), fish hooks and such ?

    Fiberglass patches?
    Thick paints?
    Other fabrics?

    Thanks for any help or advice


  • #2
    Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

    http://www.alaskaseries.com/grizzly_...ttom_armor.htm

    Comment



    • #3
      Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

      You can buy bottom protection by the foot at Defender. They offer a few sizes, which are standard on their Defender brand inflatable boats.


      Defender 430 CSM_o by slsyzygy


      Defender 430 CSM_q by slsyzygy

      Hope that helps.

      S-

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      • #4
        Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

        Hi there
        I have an Alaska Series inflatable fitted with their reinforcement. It works really well .. also on the sides for protestion against barnacles etc on pilings.

        Comment



        • #5
          Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

          It shouldn't be necessary to add any material....It's the equivalent of adding an extra sole to the bottom of a shoe.
          Elvin
          My answers are like Zen...It may not be the answer you want, but it is generally the answer you need.

          The 3 Rules:

          1) Look in your service manual first...Then ask me if it is correct.
          2) Understand that your desire to repair your engine does not mean that you have the ability to do so.
          3) If you are confused, take your engine into a dealer..Then let them be confused...At least, in theory, they sent someone to outboard 101.

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          • #6
            Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

            Originally posted by TOHATSU GURU View Post
            It shouldn't be necessary to add any material....It's the equivalent of adding an extra sole to the bottom of a shoe.
            The sole is typically the reinforced part of a shoe. For extra tough applications adding a little more material at the bottom of the pontoons makes sense for inflatables that get tough chores like the Alaska series inflatables. I've used one strangely enough in Alaska. The inflatable got dragged onto barnacle covered rocks with bits of rusted metal, gravely beaches and dragged up onto sharp rocks to get the inflatable out of the surf zone. The failure zone on the Alaska series was not on the reinforced areas, just right above it.

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            • #7
              Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

              Like I said, its the equivalent of adding an extra sole to a shoe. It does not make sense to do so under any kind of normal condition. If you worked in a nail factory and normally walked around on nails that would penetrate one sole, but not two. It would certainly not be completely ridiculous to get a shoe with a thicker sole. Inflatables are a little different. Typically anything that would penetrate one layer would almost certainly go through two layers. That's because it doesn't usually happen even through one layer. Most inflatables are damaged by sharp point objects that are not natural in origin. IE screws and nails. The Alaska inflatable was imported into the U.S. with the double layer bottom as a marketing gimmick rather than as an actual damage preventor( is that a real word? It should be). However, a variety of brands and models are made with additional chaffing pads on the bottom and sold as "heavy duty". They aren't, but that's the power of words used to promote X over Y. In the end, a double layer doesn't hurt anything other than the extra weight so it's a benign lie rather than a hurtful lie.
              Elvin
              My answers are like Zen...It may not be the answer you want, but it is generally the answer you need.

              The 3 Rules:

              1) Look in your service manual first...Then ask me if it is correct.
              2) Understand that your desire to repair your engine does not mean that you have the ability to do so.
              3) If you are confused, take your engine into a dealer..Then let them be confused...At least, in theory, they sent someone to outboard 101.

              Comment



              • #8
                Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

                Your shoe analogy doesn't correlate well to the long-gone OP's posit. If I were walking in a factory with nails on the floor - I would much prefer to get a shoe with a sole that had a higher degree of resistance to penetration vs something that didn't. That, or not walk on the floor or get the nails off the floor.

                If I were dragging inflatables onto a shoreline covered with nails, sharp glass shards, or newly-formed obsidian I would much prefer to have an extra layer on the surface of the pontoon most exposed to these materials. While PVC, Hypalon etc are incredibly tough I can guarantee you that if I used a ice pick I could poke a hole faster through one layer than two.

                At the end of the day - inflatables are not all that fast so the extra hydrodynamic drag of reinforcement probably isn't a huge factor, nor would I be taking a inflatable into those areas where repeated bashing and cutting are everyday events. In Alaska, aluminum craft are norms. Especially for landing craft, or boats which need to be beached every so often.

                If we were to get crazy about actual performance vs. opinion we could always ask for objective information from the Gary King company, or actual users of reinforced bottom inflatables. Note post #4.

                Comment



                • #9
                  Re: strengthen pvc against shore rocks etc

                  And definitely a reinforced 2 layer bottom will hold more sand abrassion if boater is an avid "beaching" user, that is, exiting a boat under power against sand shorelines repetively, some takes this as a "beach sport"

                  Happy Boating
                  Sea Rider 430 Rib Tohatsu 18/30 HP Proud Smokers

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