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Rope dry rot

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  • Rope dry rot

    I have some rope that I bought last year. It stays in the weather all the time. I don't know what it is made of, but it is completely dryrotted and comming apart. What type of rope is the best at resisting rot? Thanks all.
    sigpic
    1978 Glastron V173 Bayflite
    1979 Evinrude 150


  • #2
    Re: Rope dry rot

    I've always been partial to natural fibers like good ole sissel, Let's face it, though, for boating, you just need the poly's. Nylon is great, so is polyester. Nylon being stronger, but less static. static being stretch. Don't know whether or not you've been following my friend sasto's thread, "New job Constellation 501 good/bad". He taught us all an old seamans method of protecting and keeping ropes plyable. Coat/soak with fabric softener. Once damage is done, it's done. The fabric softener coats the individual strands and makes them slide across one another and cut into one another less. It prolongs the life of your rope. Never heard of this technique until this past week. Sounds like a complete winner to me. I'll be using it in the future. If you try it, please keep us all posted with results.

    Best of luck; hope this helps.
    Safe and happy boating always!!!,

    Veritas Honus
    1992 Chaparral 2050 SLC: 205HP 4.3L Yamaha I/O
    ShoreLand'r tandem axle trailer
    T/V: 2001 Dodge Ram 1500Sport 5.9L 4X4 Off Road Package Dana 410 rear

    Fear is only a state of mind. Gravity is a fact of life...
    No fall, however high, ever hurt anyone... It's that sudden stop at the end...

    Comment



    • #3
      Re: Rope dry rot

      When you get new ropes, keep them clean by putting them in a 5-gal buscket of soap and water and clean/rinse by hand. After than, a 5-gal bucket of water with fabric softner will keep them plyable (VH beat me to it!).

      Dirt and salt and sun are the ropes enemies.
      2001 Carver Voyager 374 'Stick's Competition'

      Something tells me I should be on the water....

      If I answer your upholstery questions, it's only because I've been doing it 20+ years...

      Comment



      • #4
        Re: Rope dry rot

        My guess is rib9844 used polypropylene line because of his description of the damage after only 1 year. Not exactly dry-rot, but UV-rot.

        Polypropylene line is the least expensive of the synthetic lines, however, it deteriorates quickly from ultra-violet rays and wear. It is not a good line for dock line because its hard surface tends to slip from cleats and can cause cuts if it runs free through your hands. It floats, so it is good for rescue lines. It is also appropriate for ski lines, dinghy painters, short mooring pendants or other applications where you want to be able to see the line on top of the water. Not for use as dock, anchor or towing lines.

        Now, as far as what's best to use, read this:
        There are many materials used today to make rope; synthetic fiber, natural fiber and wire. The most popular is nylon, a synthetic. It is strong, holds up well to the weather and stress, and coils without kinking. Line is also made from natural fibers like cotton and hemp (manila), and other synthetic fibers such as dacron, kevlar, and polypropylene.

        Nylon rope has a lot of stretch (up to 40%) and is very strong for its size, allowing it to absorb shock loads well. However, when it is wet it can lose up to 25% of its strength. It wears well, resists mildew and rot, and does not float. Nylon three-strand is the preferred line for dock lines since it stretches sufficiently to dampen the shock of wave action and wind against your cleats. Just make sure it does not stretch too much for the situation in which you use it.

        Polyester rope wears better than polypropylene, is almost as strong as Nylon, and retains its strength when wet. It does not stretch as much as Nylon and does not float. Polyester (such as Dacron) is used for sailboat running rigging, anchor rode, towing lines and other applications where you don't want line stretch to interfere. It will, however, chafe easily so check it often and protect as necessary.

        When cutting synthetic rope, prevent the ends from fraying with a temporary binding or whipping. Synthetic rope ends can be sealed by melting, either with a special heat tool for the purpose of cutting and sealing (as shown in photo), or by melting over a flame to fuse the fibers. Adhesive tape wound around the ends can be a temporary binding. Small line ends can be dipped into acetate glue or a commercial "liquid whipping" material. Plastic heat-shrink tubing is also available.

        Synthetic lines are lighter and stronger and more rot-resistant, generally, than natural fiber ropes. Synthetic lines are slipperier than natural fiber ropes so be sure to check your knots to make sure they are secure. Synthetic lines should be cleaned with fresh water and detergent, kept out of sunlight, inspected frequently for chafe, and stored dry.

        Natural fibers such as manila, sisal, hemp and cotton will shrink when they get wet and also tend to rot or become brittle. Manila is still used today on large ships and is the best natural fiber for mooring lines, anchor lines and as running rigging. Manila has a minimum of stretch and is very strong. However, it has only about one-half the strength of a comparable-sized synthetic line.

        Natural fiber line should be uncoiled from the inside of a new coil in order to prevent kinks. Always whip or tape the ends of natural fibers to keep them from unraveling. When natural fiber lines have been in salt water you should rinse them in fresh water and allow to dry thoroughly. They should then be properly coiled and stored on grates above deck in a dry, well-ventilated place to help prevent mildew and rot.

        Comment



        • #5
          Re: Rope dry rot

          Originally posted by FunInDuhSun View Post
          [I]Polypropylene line is the least expensive of the synthetic lines, It is also appropriate for ski lines, dinghy painters, short mooring pendants or other applications where you want to be able to see the line on top of the water.
          Cheap poly is only appropriate for pulling beginners on skis, and even then I prefer not to use it. It stretches, which causes two problems. If someone falls and doesn't let go right away, the rope will snap back so hard it will pass the boat, or worst case, come back straight at the driver. Also, a stretchy rope will cause all kinds of weird things for the rider as someone gets more experience.

          spectra (or amsteel) rope is a high end poly that is vastly better for watersports, but does cost more. It starts around $60 for a 75 ft line.

          Comment



          • #6
            Re: Rope dry rot

            I'll get a little more specific. The rope isn't on my boat, it around my pool. I just figured you guys would know rope better that most. The rope goes around the bottom of the legs to keep them from moving so it never gets taken off or moved. The above info is great and really apreciated.
            sigpic
            1978 Glastron V173 Bayflite
            1979 Evinrude 150

            Comment



            • #7
              Re: Rope dry rot

              Originally posted by rlb9844 View Post
              I'll get a little more specific. The rope isn't on my boat, it around my pool. I just figured you guys would know rope better that most. The rope goes around the bottom of the legs to keep them from moving so it never gets taken off or moved. The above info is great and really apreciated.
              Sorry... All of the above info applies to boating use. If you try any of the above mentioned methods for your above ground pool, it will start to leak, and probably collapse within 24 hours.... Good luck!!!
              Safe and happy boating always!!!,

              Veritas Honus
              1992 Chaparral 2050 SLC: 205HP 4.3L Yamaha I/O
              ShoreLand'r tandem axle trailer
              T/V: 2001 Dodge Ram 1500Sport 5.9L 4X4 Off Road Package Dana 410 rear

              Fear is only a state of mind. Gravity is a fact of life...
              No fall, however high, ever hurt anyone... It's that sudden stop at the end...

              Comment



              • #8
                Re: Rope dry rot

                Originally posted by Fireman431 View Post
                When you get new ropes, keep them clean by putting them in a 5-gal buscket of soap and water and clean/rinse by hand. After than, a 5-gal bucket of water with fabric softner will keep them plyable (VH beat me to it!).

                Dirt and salt and sun are the ropes enemies.
                "Here's 500 dollars. go get yourself a room, a shower, buy yourself some new clothes, and get a JOB!!!. I ever see you on the street with a BUSCKET again, I'll blow your f***ing head off!"

                What was the name of that movie with Dennis Leary? can't remember the name, but I guess I'll never forget that line!!!
                Safe and happy boating always!!!,

                Veritas Honus
                1992 Chaparral 2050 SLC: 205HP 4.3L Yamaha I/O
                ShoreLand'r tandem axle trailer
                T/V: 2001 Dodge Ram 1500Sport 5.9L 4X4 Off Road Package Dana 410 rear

                Fear is only a state of mind. Gravity is a fact of life...
                No fall, however high, ever hurt anyone... It's that sudden stop at the end...

                Comment

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