Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Welcome Guest - Sign Up today
Store Links Mobile - Shop Now

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Battery Maintainers and/or Desulphaters

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Battery Maintainers and/or Desulphaters

    We just purchased 3 new Deep Cycle 12v batteries for our boat, mid summer.

    We'll be bringing them into the house, in the basement, and putting a single maintainer on the three batteries connected in parallel. The intent is to connect the positive to #1 while the negative will connect to #3. That will maintain all three, through the winter, correct?

    Anyone use any of those Pulse Tech units, to desulphate the plates, OR to prevent sulphation bulding up on the plates to begin with?

    Or have ya'll any other ideas/suggestions to throw out there? Thank you.

  • #2
    First, donít bring them inside. The warmer the temperature the higher the discharge rate.

    Unless you live in the great white, you might be better off storing them outdoors.

    My batteries get fully charged and stay on the boat to over winter. Might throw a charger on them once or twice during winter if I remember. Usually just charge up and go in the spring.

    Proven technic. Both batteries will be 8 years old in the spring
    Last edited by dingbat; October 9th, 2017, 08:14 PM.
    ....

    Comment


    • #3
      My blue top spent 99 months in the boat .Never came out ,was never put on a charger ever.Sat unused from oct till may .Temps in winter can reach minus 30 plus sometimes.I just make sure theres no drain on the battery such as elect indicator lights.Best bet is to just disconnect the cables.I was very lucky with that battery but like all batteries she finally died.

      Comment


      • #4
        i think a lot depends on your climate, i am in a moderate temp zone, a full charge and wait on spring works fine here
        Bad Dog

        If it aint broke your not having enough fun

        my 1988 Riviera Cruzer pontoon rebuild
        http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=526820

        my pontoon trailer rebuild

        http://forums.iboats.com/forum/boat-...railer-rebuild

        Comment


        • #5
          I take mine out of the boat and keep them on a battery tender when they won't be used for a long time. If there was power available at my storage place I'd leave them in the boat, but unfortunately there's not. The batteries are identical, so I put each one on the tender individually until it switches from Charge to Storage mode, then hook them up together using a Y adapter for long term storage.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20171007_062755.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	60.4 KB
ID:	278714

          Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20171007_062815.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	56.6 KB
ID:	278713

          1995 Cobalt 252 - 502 Mag - Bravo 1

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by theNailer View Post
            We just purchased 3 new Deep Cycle 12v batteries for our boat, mid summer.

            We'll be bringing them into the house, in the basement, and putting a single maintainer on the three batteries connected in parallel. The intent is to connect the positive to #1 while the negative will connect to #3. That will maintain all three, through the winter, correct?

            Anyone use any of those Pulse Tech units, to desulphate the plates, OR to prevent sulphation bulding up on the plates to begin with?

            Or have ya'll any other ideas/suggestions to throw out there? Thank you.
            It really depends a lot, on the type of battery.

            Wet acid, GEL, AGM, or Lithium batteries?


            Some tenders are not compatible with all types of batteries.
            Charge rates and voltage requirements vary.
            Use the wrong type, and battery life will be shortened.
            Last edited by roscoe; October 7th, 2017, 02:40 PM.
            Medford, WI


            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the replies, guys!

              A) yes, I do live in the Great White North. Winterpeg Manisnowba, to be exact. -30 to -45, easy.
              B) These are wet-cells.
              C) I'm planning on simply using a maintainer, on each one. Then I was thinking about hooking them up parallel, with the maintainer positive on #1+ and the maintainer negative on #3-.

              That should work, right?

              Comment


              • #8
                If you're going in parallel you have all of the positive posts connected together and all of the negative posts connected together. At that point it doesn't make any difference which battery you connect either of the charging leads to so long as you match polarity.
                1995 Cobalt 252 - 502 Mag - Bravo 1

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bring them inside and do not lay them directly on concrete. I use a piece of plywood below them. I don't leave them on the battery minder all winter. I charge them to full and let them sit, then charge them fully in April. I may be wrong but never had a problem. going on 7 years on all 3 batteries.
                  Experience is a lifetime of mistakes, wisdom is not making them again.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post
                    Bring them inside and do not lay them directly on concrete. I use a piece of plywood below them. I don't leave them on the battery minder all winter. I charge them to full and let them sit, then charge them fully in April. I may be wrong but never had a problem. going on 7 years on all 3 batteries.
                    Batteries with plastic cases are just fine on concrete. There may have been some merit to the concrete thing when battery cases were made out of rubber or some other porous material but it doesn't matter with plastic shells.
                    1995 Cobalt 252 - 502 Mag - Bravo 1

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My boats are stored in a building with no power, so I bring the batteries into the garage for the winter.
                      I throw them on the charger every 4 or 6 weeks and top them off.
                      I don't leave the charger on all the time as there is no need to keep the battery at 100%, and no need to have electric equipment running all the time.
                      Medford, WI


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Old Ironmaker View Post
                        Bring them inside and do not lay them directly on concrete.
                        Ahhhh...the myth that won't go away.
                        http://www.trojanbattery.com/tech-support/faq/#Myths
                        1998 Wellcraft Eclipse 24 Cuddy
                        Volvo Penta Duo-Prop 7.4L "LK"

                        2006 Sun Tracker Party Barge 21
                        Mercury 90 4-Stroke FI
                        "Common sense is not very common"
                        "Failing to prepare is preparing to fail." -- John Wooden

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sign up today
                          I leave my batteries in the boat with my 2 channel ProMariner Sport charger plugged in - boat is in the garage so it doesn't get as cold as it gets outside here in MN, I'm not really a fan of the idea of putting all the batteries in parallel on a tender unless it is a pretty dumb one that isn't trying to detect the battery state. better to spend a few extra bucks for a 3 channel charger/maintainer.
                          2012 Malibu VTX 5.7 Monsoon 350
                          2009 Ram CC 5.7 Hemi

                          www.oldjeep.com

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X