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I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

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  • I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

    I am looking at purchasing a new boat (hurricane SD237) and I am looking to get soem info on the pros and cons of I/O's vs outboards. My only experiance has been with outboards. I have heard things like i/o are cheaper to work on, initial cost is less, however the require more water to run in.


  • #2
    Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

    SternDrives are far heavier than comparable horsepower outboards. Outboards are generally quicker out of the hole and faster at full throttle. The weight of a stern drive is more centered in the boat rather than hanging off the back. That also reduces the amount of passenger room in the boat. Neither is cheap to work on or purchase. There are much bigger Hp stern drive motors than outboards, and there are much smaller Hp outboards than stern drives. Depending on a lot of factors, outboards can be operated in shallower water at slow speeds. Old stern drive motors are more fuel efficient than old outboards of the same Hp. Nearly all stern drive motors can be operated on lakes that ban carbureted 2-stroke motors. Stern drives must be winterized in your neck of the woods wheras many outboard owners neglect that procedure with far less dire results. There's a few differences for you, and there are exceptions to many of these.
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    • #3
      Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

      The big advantage I see with an outboard is when I pull my boat out of the water in the winter and let it drain for a few seconds I don't have to worry about it freezing up. I fish year 'round and would hate the thoughts of winterizing an I/O after every trip. I would probably quit fishing in the winter if I had to do that everytime.

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      • #4
        Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

        The other thing that I am considering is that the engine options are merc with merc leg or merc with volvo pentara leg or the outboard option is yamaha only................

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        • #5
          Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

          Walleye,I have owned boats with outboards until this year when I purchased a little used Cobalt with Volvo Penta 4.3L GS (205 hp). Always wanted one!After using the boat for 50 hours this summer I have decided to sell the rig and purchase a smaller boat with outboard. I decided to sell because the boat is too big for our lake, it's a pain in shallower areas and really sucks the gas. I love the Cobalt its one of the best built boats on the market, but I'm not as impressed with the engine and stern drive. I thought it would be smother and quieter, but for skiing and tubing an outboard has it beat hands down. Outboards give you much more room inside the boat so a 17' O/B has more room than a 19' I/O.I do all my own maintenance and even though the Volvo Penta is very reliable there is a lot of things that can/will go wrong and it takes a lot more to keep it in tip top conditions. Winterizing is a real pain compared with an outboard and to do it properly it takes about four hours compared to less than two with my outboards.If you are going to use your boat for cruising then the I/O is very nice, but if you use it primarily for water sports, I'd recommend the outboard.

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          • #6
            Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

            http://www.iboats.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ul...c;f=1;t=010241

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            • #7
              Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

              thanks for the input, I primarily use my boat for fishing, very little water sports. The lake that i go to does have some shallow spots around 3ft deep getting from the marina to the open lake, generally how much more water do i/o need to run in than outboards/

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              • #8
                Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                I got my first I/O 3 years ago really like it. I have a f/s openbow that does a little of everything. I think it's good on gas compared to an outboard two stroke anyway, it's quiet and I have no motor to look at or get in the way. The winterization is more work but it's not hard.3ft is a little shallow, are you planning to idle out or are you asking if you can take off in 3 ft of water? You can plane over 3 ft of water but you can't start or stop that shallow with out risking your skeg,prop or outdrive.

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                • #9
                  Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                  Walleye,If you are going to use it primarily for fishing and some water sports then I would go for an EFI 4 stroke outboard. An I/O at trawling speeds will require the bilge blower which can be noisier than the motor!Yamaha, Mercury, Johnson/Suzuki make great 4 strokes.In my case the Volvo I/O required at least 4 to 5 feet of water before you could safely take off with lots of throttle.

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                  • #10
                    Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                    Walleye,I/O's and shallow water do not necessarily get along.Another important question. What is the boat rated for as far as max. horsepower?

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                    • #11
                      Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                      I enjoy my 1986 I/O quite a bit. I bought it over an outboard because in the older used category, it is smoke free, cheaper to run, and quieter than a two stroke.If I would be buying new, a four stroke outboard would be my choice and in an aluminum boat. You need far less horsepower to move this at a good clip as compaired to an I/O in a fiberglass boat and get the same quietness and smoke free operation. This solution translates into gas savings all around. You won't need a large pickup to trailer it and it will be cheaper to operate on the water. It's a win win situation.

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                      • #12
                        Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                        I guess it depends on what you are going to do and what your priorities are.For me, the extra 9 to 12 square feet of deck space in an outboard boat is enough reason to nix an I/O.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                          the marina is about 6.5 feet and once i clear the last boat i have about 200 yards ... lots of space to plane before it becomes about 3 ft for about 25 feet...they didnt dredge far enough. As far as the max hp. they do sell it with i think as large as a 6.2l i am looking at the 5.7l. Its a huge lake, about 75 miles long by about 7 miles accross on average and often i will go about 7-10 miles from the marina ( fishing is always better on the other side) my current boat has a 225 evinrude outboard and it loves to suck the gas especially at wot. The Hurrican sundeck 237 has the same amount of floor space if you go with the i/o or outboard, instead of an engine under the rear compartment you gain some storage, however on a 23.7foot boat the extra stroage isnt that big of a deal. what is invloved in winterizing an i/o vs an outboard

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                          • #14
                            Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                            Walleye,The reason I asked about max hp is that a 23.7 foot boat is going to be a wallowing PIG with anything less than a 225-250 class outboard-no matter what it is.I/O's require you to: pull hoses, dump RV antifreeze into cavities, drain block, service outdrive (including "pulling the drive" for gimbal bearing service, etc. Outboards require a fogging, maybe, drain and service lower unit and tilt them down.All in all, the I/O is maintenance intensive compared to an outboard.With the size and type of that boat, I'd go I/O.If it was a center console (fishing boat) I'd go outboard.As a side note, I'm thinking this boat is a deck boat? Are you sure you want that?

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                            • #15
                              Re: I/O vs Outboard - pros and cons of each

                              ...sorry. Didn't see the initial size of your boat. Are these the two models you are comparing? http://www.boatinginternational.com/.../htm/237io.htm http://www.boatinginternational.com/.../htm/237ob.htm

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