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Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

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  • Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

    Hello all. Have a 1995 Johnson 70 HP outboard that needs lower end rebuilt. My brother, who is a pretty decent mechanic, has rebuilt a couple Mercury lower units, and offered to do the job for me. (He hasn't repaired a Johnson yet.) Anyhow, in the service manual, it references maybe a dozen special tools in doing the lower unit job. (ie: driveshaft holding socket, shaft puller and backing plate, pinion bearing remover, bearing housing guide pins, shift rod height gauge, etc.) Thought I'd purchase any tools that are absolutely required to save time and aggravation. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Thanks.


  • #2
    Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

    Welcome aboard Donald and Walter . . . ehh dan??

    I am going to move this to our JohnnyRude section, you'll get more help over there for this . . . Good luck.
    Keep the faith!!! We'll be back stronger than ever

    Comment



    • #3
      Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

      I am in the process of resealing my 85 120hp johnson. Here's my take on it. I was able to make my own puller using an automotive harmonic balancer puller and thread-all. This was to remove the bearing housing.

      You don't need the drive shaft holding socket. You can hold the end of the drive shaft by the splines with a pipe wrench. Be sure it's adjusted properly so it won't slip - it will not do any damage to the splines. I watched a mechanic take one apart using this method and I'm using it on mine with no problems.

      I was able to get an 11/16" wrench on the pinon nut so the prop shaft holding tool wasn't needed. Put wrench on nut and break nut free by turning drive shaft with pipe wrench.

      Shift rod height tool is not needed. Once the lower unit is off, screw the shift rod in until it stops and count the amount of turns. Later when you install it, back it out this many turns and you have the same setting.

      Didn't need any special bearing tools on mine because it had the V6 commercial gearcase and all the rollers just fall out and require sticking back into the runners with wheel bearing grease so they don't fall out upon assemble. Your lower unit might be different.

      Out of all the fancy tools, the only one I had to borrow was the large set of snap ring pliers. These things were a must. No store in town had suitable ones for me to purchase to complete the snap ring installation. Make sure you get ones that will fit into your gearcase housing because they make some really large bulky ones.

      Hopefully someone else will follow up with more knowledge on your particular gear case.

      Comment



      • #4
        Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

        Originally posted by tal View Post
        I am in the process of resealing my 85 120hp johnson. Here's my take on it. I was able to make my own puller using an automotive harmonic balancer puller and thread-all. This was to remove the bearing housing.

        You don't need the drive shaft holding socket. You can hold the end of the drive shaft by the splines with a pipe wrench. Be sure it's adjusted properly so it won't slip - it will not do any damage to the splines. I watched a mechanic take one apart using this method and I'm using it on mine with no problems.

        I was able to get an 11/16" wrench on the pinon nut so the prop shaft holding tool wasn't needed. Put wrench on nut and break nut free by turning drive shaft with pipe wrench.

        Shift rod height tool is not needed. Once the lower unit is off, screw the shift rod in until it stops and count the amount of turns. Later when you install it, back it out this many turns and you have the same setting.

        Didn't need any special bearing tools on mine because it had the V6 commercial gearcase and all the rollers just fall out and require sticking back into the runners with wheel bearing grease so they don't fall out upon assemble. Your lower unit might be different.

        Out of all the fancy tools, the only one I had to borrow was the large set of snap ring pliers. These things were a must. No store in town had suitable ones for me to purchase to complete the snap ring installation. Make sure you get ones that will fit into your gearcase housing because they make some really large bulky ones.

        Hopefully someone else will follow up with more knowledge on your particular gear case.
        While I don't have experience on that exact gearcase, I feel a rebuttal is in order. You need a drive shaft socket and torque wrench to properly tighten the nut on the bottom. Ok, go ahead and fake it if you want, the worst things that can happen is the nut come off and wipe out everything. Or the shaft break from over torque. Besides, the bearing height is set with a known torque on the nut, which relates to how far the tapered shaft is pressed into the pinion.

        If the manual specifies a pinion bearing gauge, it is mandatory if you replace any of those parts. Or fake it and risk stripping the teeth off all the gears.

        Shift rod height is able to be set back to where it is now--if you know it is right. Read some of the threads here concerning improper shifting and clutch dog wear.

        The guide pins are necessary to reinstall the bearing carrier. In this case, you can make your own out of all-thread.

        On most, you need the bearing removers and installers if the bearings have to be replaced. There is more to the bearing than the rollers.

        Agreed, you won't get past first base without those honkin' big snap ring pliers.

        Comment



        • #5
          Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

          As a Certified Master Tech by J/E I can give you a few hints.
          As the previous posted said a driveshaft holding tool is a necessity. No good mechanic would use a pipe wrench. They are available for some engines aftermarket, I don't know about yours, never looked or order one from the dealer.
          You don't need a shift shaft height tool a measuring tape will work fine. Measure it in neutral, don't rely on the turns out from seated BS, long term damage can occur.
          You will need the snap ring pliers. You may be able to talk to a local transmission shop into letting you borrow or even taking the gearcase to then to remove and re-install the snap rings.
          If you are not replacing bearings you are OK. If you are then special tools make it much easier and done correctly, Particularly the pinion bearing.
          Shimming the gearcase is very important. Aftermarket tools are available but are expensive. It must be shimmed correctly. If you are not replacing the DS bearing housing or pinion bearing you MIGHT get away with not shimming, but I would not send a customer's lower out the door without checking.
          You must use a good service manual, trying to do it without a service manual is a waste of time.
          Good luck
          You let the factory smoke out of it. All products have smoke installed in them from the factory. You can not purchase this smoke. The problem is, when you let the smoke out of it, the part is ruined and you have to get a new one. I wish I could find a place that sold the factory smoke.

          Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.

          3 X APBA Formula V Nat'l Champion
          APBA Formula V US-1
          It took me 29 years to become an overnight success.

          Comment



          • #6
            Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

            The drive shaft socket is easily made from a scrap crankshaft of the same size with good splines ... cut off the bottom end of the crank and weld to a socket or short extension. My dad's shop had a few of the home made special tools.
            Jim

            ===============================
            I don't respond to Private Messages PM's that are motor questions.

            For basic information on a wide range of topics, see Top Secret File
            Link: http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=299680

            OEM shop manual: outboardbooks.com or Ebay

            Comment



            • #7
              Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

              Harbor Freight has some long snap ring pliers that worked on my V6.

              My Clymer manual recommends a special tool for the pinion nut. I used a 7/8" wrench. To reinstall I used a piece of masking tape on the wrench to hold the nut to get it started. I have since bought an OEM manual and lo and behold that's what it says to use.

              A 3' steel rule worked for the shift rod gauge.

              I cheated and used a 3/4" wrench on the flat area that drives the impeller. I will probably pull it apart and rent a driveshaft socket and re-torque it.

              I didn't realize I needed guide pins but you can cut the heads off some long bolts for those.

              I am lucky that a local independent repair shop where I buy most of my parts will rent out some of the special tools. They even installed my new seals for me when I took the two bearing carriers to them. They would probably let me use the driveshaft socket in the parking lot if I asked.

              I didn't have to replace any of the bearings.

              Comment



              • #8
                Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                Originally posted by Ken G View Post
                Harbor Freight has some long snap ring pliers that worked on my V6.

                My Clymer manual recommends a special tool for the pinion nut. I used a 7/8" wrench. To reinstall I used a piece of masking tape on the wrench to hold the nut to get it started. I have since bought an OEM manual and lo and behold that's what it says to use.

                A 3' steel rule worked for the shift rod gauge.

                I cheated and used a 3/4" wrench on the flat area that drives the impeller. I will probably pull it apart and rent a driveshaft socket and re-torque it.

                I didn't realize I needed guide pins but you can cut the heads off some long bolts for those.

                I am lucky that a local independent repair shop where I buy most of my parts will rent out some of the special tools. They even installed my new seals for me when I took the two bearing carriers to them. They would probably let me use the driveshaft socket in the parking lot if I asked.

                I didn't have to replace any of the bearings.
                I don't think you'll find a driveshaft socket in any rental place ... it's unique to BRP/OMC outboards and the alternative to buying one from BRP is to make one.
                Jim

                ===============================
                I don't respond to Private Messages PM's that are motor questions.

                For basic information on a wide range of topics, see Top Secret File
                Link: http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=299680

                OEM shop manual: outboardbooks.com or Ebay

                Comment



                • #9
                  Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                  Thanks to all for the advice. The motor is for a 16' Sylvan I bought that is solid, but somewhat neglected and motor missing. (Price was right.) I thought the whole thing would be a great winter project for me and my teenage son to tackle in the off season. Probably will be hearing more from me. Really appreciate the friendly atmosphere and knowledge found here.

                  Comment



                  • #10
                    Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                    If I wasn't clear enough it is an independent MARINE repair shop that also sells parts. They also rent out some of the special tools needed for repairing the beasts.

                    Comment



                    • #11
                      Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                      I agree with everything said. I would have used the shaft holding tool too if I had one, but I was able to manage since my pinon nut only calls for 30-32 ft lbs. With caution and common sense you can get the torque to what you need. I did this by setting my pipe wrench to required torque and applying pressure to stationary bolt, then replicating this with my pipe wrench. I can see this being difficult if it were more torque.

                      You might want to look at harbor freight. They do have sets of spline shaft sockets, however, none of them would fit my driveshaft as 3/4" was the largest they had. Perhaps one of the mechanics here know what the size of the shaft is on your particular gearcase. One of the SAE sizes might work for you.

                      Marking the shift rod with tape is a good idea just in case you lose count.

                      Good luck with your case.

                      Comment



                      • #12
                        Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                        Originally posted by tal View Post
                        I agree with everything said. I would have used the shaft holding tool too if I had one, but I was able to manage since my pinon nut only calls for 30-32 ft lbs. With caution and common sense you can get the torque to what you need. I did this by setting my pipe wrench to required torque and applying pressure to stationary bolt, then replicating this with my pipe wrench.

                        Marking the shift rod with tape is a good idea just in case you lose count.
                        Could you please explain how you set torque on a pipe wrench?

                        The shift rod height is a very precise height, usually within 1/32" tolerance. Taping or counting turns doesn't cut it. What is so hard about measuring with a tape measure?
                        You let the factory smoke out of it. All products have smoke installed in them from the factory. You can not purchase this smoke. The problem is, when you let the smoke out of it, the part is ruined and you have to get a new one. I wish I could find a place that sold the factory smoke.

                        Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.

                        3 X APBA Formula V Nat'l Champion
                        APBA Formula V US-1
                        It took me 29 years to become an overnight success.

                        Comment



                        • #13
                          Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                          A calibrated pipe wrench ... and I thought I had everything!
                          Jim

                          ===============================
                          I don't respond to Private Messages PM's that are motor questions.

                          For basic information on a wide range of topics, see Top Secret File
                          Link: http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=299680

                          OEM shop manual: outboardbooks.com or Ebay

                          Comment



                          • #14
                            Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                            YES! A torque pipe wrench, you guys don't have one?

                            What I intended to say was I set my 3/8" torque wrench to 30-32 lbs and torqued a bolt I had on an old 350ci sitting on an engine stand. I then did the pipe wrench and replicated the torque on the drive shaft to tighten down the pinon nut. I know it isn't perfect but I'm sure I got it close.

                            Jeff, I misread your post earlier this morning. For some reason I thought you had said marking the rod with masking tape. I don't think there's anything wrong with using a measuring tape. Nor do I see anything wrong with the screwing in and counting out method. I'm sure the mechanic I borrowed the snap ring pliers from wouldn't have guided me in the wrong direction if there was something so terribly wrong with the count method. I suppose this will only work if the gearcase was in the correct position to start though.

                            Sorry for any confusion, only trying to help another in need.

                            Comment



                            • #15
                              Re: Special tools for OMC/Johnson repair.

                              Originally posted by tal View Post
                              YES! A torque pipe wrench, you guys don't have one?

                              What I intended to say was I set my 3/8" torque wrench to 30-32 lbs and torqued a bolt I had on an old 350ci sitting on an engine stand. I then did the pipe wrench and replicated the torque on the drive shaft to tighten down the pinon nut. I know it isn't perfect but I'm sure I got it close.

                              Jeff, I misread your post earlier this morning. For some reason I thought you had said marking the rod with masking tape. I don't think there's anything wrong with using a measuring tape. Nor do I see anything wrong with the screwing in and counting out method. I'm sure the mechanic I borrowed the snap ring pliers from wouldn't have guided me in the wrong direction if there was something so terribly wrong with the count method. I suppose this will only work if the gearcase was in the correct position to start though.

                              Sorry for any confusion, only trying to help another in need.
                              In other words, you guessed at the torque. My hat's off to you if you got it anywhere within 10-15 pounds. They do give you 2 pounds for error though.

                              Comment

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