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Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

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  • #16
    Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

    I have one that snapped off on me in the midsection. It's the one that is under the trim tab. I don't have a welder or equipment to do that, so my only option is a propane torch. I've tried grinding a slot into it with a dremel so I could try my impact driver, but it's not moving. So, what's ya'lls take on using the propane torch, since it's all I have? Just get it glowing red hot and try vice grips?
    I have another one in the engine block all the way at the bottom, but it's got to come off anyways and go to the machine shop for some work, so I'll let them deal with that one.

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    • #17
      Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

      Can you replace the old bolts with Stainless ones..also would it be best to use never sieze on them also or would that cause problems with them loosening later on...

      Also a old timer told me once..on stuck bolts..if you have a air impact gun..turn the air way down and just hit the bolt a few times..the lite impact sometimes loosens them..you just want it to tap it repeatedly..

      Al
      Always check your pisser for water when boating..takes a sec to look back..

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      • #18
        Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

        Originally posted by Al-53 View Post
        Can you replace the old bolts with Stainless ones..also would it be best to use never sieze on them also or would that cause problems with them loosening later on...

        Also a old timer told me once..on stuck bolts..if you have a air impact gun..turn the air way down and just hit the bolt a few times..the lite impact sometimes loosens them..you just want it to tap it repeatedly..

        Al
        The corrosion is cause by the dissimilar metals (aluminum and steel) and you will still get corrosion with stainless bolts. Heli-coils help but are expensive. Some anti-seize products have metal in them which just makes things worse. Use Sealer 1000 on the bolts, but for a saltwater motor, nothing is sure fire except using epoxy on the bolts and the wrong kind are as bad if not worse than the corrosion. Even a 3/8 drive air tool, turned down will break a bolt unless you are very careful.
        Bear 45/70

        sigpic

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        • #19
          Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

          The fasteners should already be SS ... I've never seen anything else.
          Jim

          ===============================
          I don't respond to Private Messages PM's that are motor questions.

          For basic information on a wide range of topics, see Top Secret File
          Link: http://forums.iboats.com/showthread.php?t=299680

          OEM shop manual: outboardbooks.com or Ebay

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          • #20
            Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

            Mine all are, but they still snap. I've got to finish pulling the powerhead off tomorrow, so I'll try the torch on the snapped bolt in the midsection and post how it goes, or doesn't. Wish I had welding equipment/experience.

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            • #21
              Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

              Lots of heat suggestions here but I had a saying that worked for me for many years. Heat 'em and beat 'em. If you can get to the area surrounding the bolt threads where it's frozen beat on it. Use a hammer, or a hammer with a punch, whatever it takes to rap it. The idea is to break up the corrosion and the hold it has on the bolt shank and threads. I've found that the beating it method sometimes works when the heating it method fails, and a combination of the two approaches may work the best.

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              • #22
                Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                Originally posted by wilde1j View Post
                The fasteners should already be SS ... I've never seen anything else.
                First off, most fastners in O/Bs and especially older O/Bs are not stainless.

                Secondly, most stainless bolts are softer than a steel bolt and will break easier.
                Bear 45/70

                sigpic

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                • #23
                  Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                  Originally posted by Al-53 View Post
                  Can you replace the old bolts with Stainless ones..also would it be best to use never sieze on them also or would that cause problems with them loosening later on...


                  Al
                  Some background on galvanic corrosion:

                  http://www.ssina.com/corrosion/galvanic.html

                  Comment



                  • #24
                    Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                    I have questions! (big surprise)

                    I thought that the goal of heating it was to get it to expand and loosen it's grip on the bolt, so anything I have tried this on involved keeping the bolt cool and heating the housing. As you can imagine, since Aluminum conducts heat so well, this is almost impossible.

                    So you guys heat the bolt?!?! Gosh, I wish I had known that...
                    Steve
                    Livin' the Dream
                    The Black Pearl - homemade pontoon boat - 1959 Johnson 18HP
                    On A Whim - 1990 ChrisCraft Concept 198 - 4.3L HO, Cobra outdrive

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                    • #25
                      Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                      The heat disrupts the 'salts' formed on the screw threads due to galvanic corrosion as well as the differential expansion tending to assist breaking the bond.

                      Comment



                      • #26
                        Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                        Well, the score is propane torch 1, broken bolt 0.
                        I did what Boatdood was suggesting, heat it and beat it. My particular bolt was the one in the midsection, right above the trim tab. I was pulling the lower unit and this bolt snapped on me instantly, no warning, barely even got the socket on it. It only snapped the head off, so once the lower unit was removed it had plently of shaft length to get ahold of with some vice grips. I used a propane torch, kept steady heat on it, and every minute or so I'd give it a few good thumps with the vice grips, either side to side or just directly on the bottom of the bolt (where the head used to be before it snapped). Did that for about 5 mins, locked the vice grips on, and although it was a bit stiff, it did come out without needing anything more than the vice grips. I had a 2' steel bar for a breaker bar if I needed it, but I didn't.
                        Just wanted to pass on the info in case others are keeping an eye on this thread also.
                        And thanks to those who replied to the original posters' problem, it helped me.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                          I have found that heating the bolt to red hot glowing, then letting is cool works sometimes. But you have to replace the bolt because you destroyed it's temper.
                          Bear 45/70

                          sigpic

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                          • #28
                            Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                            shock and the blue wrench wins again.!
                            sigpic
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                            Get the genuine factory service manual.
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                            • #29
                              Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                              Interesting. I always heat the aluminum housing around the bolt as it will expand and don't heat the bolt at all (although it gets it indirectly) and it usually works. I guess everyone does it differently just like trying to free up stuck pistons!
                              Steve.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Corroded Bolts in Aluminum

                                Originally posted by samo_ott View Post
                                Interesting. I always heat the aluminum housing around the bolt as it will expand and don't heat the bolt at all (although it gets it indirectly) and it usually works. I guess everyone does it differently just like trying to free up stuck pistons!
                                The guy that showed me the red hot bolt trick had a machine shop and almost all he dealt with was outboards, sterndrives and inboards. Usually by the time he got them, everything else had been tried. He did have an EDM machine for the broke off even with the surface bolts in non-replaceable castings.
                                Bear 45/70

                                sigpic

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