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Using a tablet for a GPS and Chartplotter. Has anyone tried this.

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  • Using a tablet for a GPS and Chartplotter. Has anyone tried this.

    Just bought a boat that we are converting to a open fisherman. of course living on the florida gulf we have to go a ways out to actually catch decent size fish. I was looking at GPS/ chart-plotters and bout fell out of the seat when i seen the prices. My question is, has anyone used the apps. available for android systems. I know I would have to buy other stuff like transducer and GPS antenna to make it work but would like to here from people that has used these systems and learn what all i would need to make it work. just trying to cut the cost and have a larger screen in the process. I know most apps. would have a yearly subscription cost so lets hear your input and experience on this subject. my ting is finding cost efficiency. ***Picture for attention***

  • #2
    Many ppl do,... you can purchase and download the charts for your area very reasonably priced through Navionics,.. your gps signal is then overlaid on your already loaded maps. Works great till you loose gps signal,...then break out the compass.
    1990 SeaRay 280 Sundancer w/twin 5.0 Mercruisers
    1988 SeaRay 230 Weekender w/ 5.7 Mercruiser
    1969 Starcraft Suncruiser 20V (project in works)
    1992 Winner 180 w/ 5.7 Mercruiser (like new w/cracked block)
    1989 SeaRay 290 Amber Jack w/ twin 5.7 Mercruisers (parts boat)
    1981 Thompson Sportsman 20' hardtop w/165hp Mercruiser (sold)
    1978 SeaRay 190 SRV w/ 160hp Mercruiser (sold)
    1975 Silverline 18' w/ 115hp Mercury O/B (sold)
    1960 Thompson 18' woody w/ 90hp Evinrude (dads boat, sold)

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    • #3
      works great until the sun is out. most tablets are intended for indoors and are not sunlight readable. so it becomes useless on the dash of your boat during the day. especially in the florida sun while gulf. you need a sunlight readable GPS to navigate most ICW channels.
      1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - http://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

      Past Boats
      1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
      2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheasheads in Paradise"
      1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

      What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

      Comment


      • #4
        I was more wandering how it worked when you loose cell signal. which where i like to fish has none. so would the add on hardware for the gps and fish finder boost the signal or am i going to get about the same result as trying to make a call with no signal.

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        • #5
          A gps signal is more likely than cell service,..thats why i said to download the maps to your device before heading out.
          1990 SeaRay 280 Sundancer w/twin 5.0 Mercruisers
          1988 SeaRay 230 Weekender w/ 5.7 Mercruiser
          1969 Starcraft Suncruiser 20V (project in works)
          1992 Winner 180 w/ 5.7 Mercruiser (like new w/cracked block)
          1989 SeaRay 290 Amber Jack w/ twin 5.7 Mercruisers (parts boat)
          1981 Thompson Sportsman 20' hardtop w/165hp Mercruiser (sold)
          1978 SeaRay 190 SRV w/ 160hp Mercruiser (sold)
          1975 Silverline 18' w/ 115hp Mercury O/B (sold)
          1960 Thompson 18' woody w/ 90hp Evinrude (dads boat, sold)

          Comment


          • #6
            I like Navionics and use it quite a bit. I've used it between my phone, tablet and computer - but I only take my phone with me out on the water. I use it here in TN mostly, and I've never been without signal. I have used it on the ICW in Florida, but again, I've never been outside of the cell signal.

            I do like that I can pre-program routes on the computer and load them into my phone. I have to look and see if the maps load locally or not - I've never needed to know.

            I will say - that app eats battery power!
            [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_270443_1499813187632_202[/ATTACH]

            Comment


            • #7
              I understand you had a specific question about tablets and I haven't a clue about how or what the cost of the addition of your tablet app, xduce and GPS anteni and associated interface and not to mention the table isn't necessarily a good outdoor device but, check out these..........All of the selected units include coastal charts, xducr and have built in GPS.

              My guess is you'd spend close to the same given the prices of this Garmin line and have a tad bit more robust system designed for your needs.
              Last edited by sam am I; September 20th, 2017, 10:11 AM.

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              • #8
                I have this exact unit aboard my boat and Im very impressed for the price, ( I got it cheaper than the listed price),..and I will eventually I will move up to one of the higher end models.
                1990 SeaRay 280 Sundancer w/twin 5.0 Mercruisers
                1988 SeaRay 230 Weekender w/ 5.7 Mercruiser
                1969 Starcraft Suncruiser 20V (project in works)
                1992 Winner 180 w/ 5.7 Mercruiser (like new w/cracked block)
                1989 SeaRay 290 Amber Jack w/ twin 5.7 Mercruisers (parts boat)
                1981 Thompson Sportsman 20' hardtop w/165hp Mercruiser (sold)
                1978 SeaRay 190 SRV w/ 160hp Mercruiser (sold)
                1975 Silverline 18' w/ 115hp Mercury O/B (sold)
                1960 Thompson 18' woody w/ 90hp Evinrude (dads boat, sold)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was more wandering how it worked when you loose cell signal.
                  You don't need a cell signal for the GPS to work.
                  Screen brightness depends on the tablet but you could always make up a little cover to shade it.
                  One thing I should point out, some tablets go 'black' if you turn the screen 90 degrees while wearing polaroid sunglasses so check that out before cutting any holes in your boat. Navionics is a very good thing, check their website for tablet/phone compatibility.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shaw520 View Post
                    I have this exact unit aboard my boat and Im very impressed for the price, ( I got it cheaper than the listed price),..and I will eventually I will move up to one of the higher end models.
                    and it comes factory in a sun-light readable LCD display and has sonar......the correct tool for the job
                    1988 Cruisers Rogue 2420 -VP 290 DP now powered by custom 468 - http://forums.iboats.com/forum/owner...988-rogue-2420

                    Past Boats
                    1970 Wooster Hellion - Merc 9.8
                    2002 SeaRay 190BR - 5.0 - A1G2 - "Cheasheads in Paradise"
                    1984 Avanti 170DLI -3.0 stringer- "Ship Happens"

                    What’s behind you doesn’t matter.Enzo Ferrari

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Something else to keep in mind - tablets and phones aren't designed to handle the heat when in the sunlight. I use my iPhone for music on the boat, and if I put it on the dashboard on a sunny day, I get about 30 mins before it overheats and shuts down.

                      While I don't have experience using phones/tablets for navigation purposes on the boat, I have been playing with various Android devices for offroad/4x4 navigation since the first Android phone, the G1, back in 2008, and also have went through many Windows and Linux based mini computer systems with 8 to 10" monitors. Like anything else, they have their pros and cons. Screen readability outside of some the earlier devices was pretty poor, but like any modern cell phone, the screens now are pretty decent outside. I have no problem seeing the screen on the iPhone 6 outside, but it's nowhere even remotely close to the brightness and clarity of a screen on the chart plotters/GPS/fish finders/etc intended for a boat. I find the GPS antennas built into many of the less expensive devices are also poor compared to other dedicated devices. If you try to mount one inside a dash, you're likely going to be disappointed quick. The bigger name brands do seem to work pretty well though - Google phones, iPhones/iPads, HTC, Samsung, etc.

                      I've also found that mounting them can be a real bear. If your device of choice falls into what Ram mounts cover, you're golden. ProClip also makes a decent selection of bolt down mounts that work well, but also is a bit pricey.

                      What I'm now currently running is a radio head unit made by Joying that is a lot like an Android tablet permanently mounted into a double DIN radio chassis. It runs Android natively, has a capacitive touch screen, as well as a small radio amp built in as well as supports having an external GPS antenna connection. So I can push it down into the dash to block the sunlight from hitting the screen, and mount the GPS antenna on the roof for better signal. I'm likely going to end up putting this one in my boat, and buy a newer model for the truck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a Garmin Montana that I run in Marine Mode when on the boat. It works okay. The nice thing about it is I can take it in the woods, put it in road mode and get my driving directions, and I can download the Navionics maps to it if I want to be even more precise on the water. It is not GREAT at any one of the uses listed, but for $500 it is good at all three.

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                        • #13
                          I tried using my tablet to log my catches and mark on a map. The glare was just too much and became more frustrating. I ended up fishing less because of the hassle.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by aspeck View Post
                            I have a Garmin Montana that I run in Marine Mode when on the boat. nice thing about it is I can take it in the woods, put it in road mode and get my driving directions, and I can download the Navionics maps to it if I want to be even more precise on the water.
                            interesting....I know of no other Garmin unit that supports third party (navionics) maps.

                            I prefer and run Garmin Bluechart G2 and Vision (auto routing) charts on both chart plotters.
                            ....

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                            • #15
                              Sign up today
                              Thanks for everyones advice. I think i will just get the combo finder/ gps due to the glare that would be involved with the pad.

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