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transom replacement on jet boat

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  • transom replacement on jet boat

    Hi,I am new to the forums and am new to boating.I recently purchased a 75 Wriedt, it has a 460 with a Berkely Jet on it. Unfortunatley I bought this boat off of ebay, and the seller failed to mention that the transom is in dire need of replacment(the guy is even a marine mechanic)So, here are a few questions:I am confused as to what people mean by aluminum or fiberglass boats, my boat is firberglass but how do I know if the frame is aluminum or wood? The transom is wood but it looks like there is some metal towards the base of the boat.when I read on this website and it says to cut the top of the boat to get to the wood, do they literally mean to take a saw and cut across the top of the boat?What are the inner and outter "skins" on the transom?What is my first step after removing the jet drive and engine?Why dont they just make these wood pieces "bolt in?" to make replacment easier? thanksJoshua


  • #2
    Re: transom replacement on jet boat

    I am confused as to what people mean by aluminum or fiberglass boats, my boat is fiberglass but how do I know if the frame is aluminum or wood? Chances are the majority of the hull (the actual boat) will be a wooden framework (stringers)with a composite (combination of fiberglass and resin) structure built to, around, and connecting that.I am assuming the boat is a mostly fiberglass type boat and not mostly fiberglass over wood.The transom is wood but it looks like there is some metal toward the base of the boat.The transom is probably built up of plywood layers then covered with the composite fiberglass, topped off with gelcoat (paintlike stuff)The metal you are seeing is perhaps a framework used to support the motor and jet unit, and may, or may not actually be a component of the initial basic hull.when I read on this website and it says to cut the top of the boat to get to the wood, do they literally mean to take a saw and cut across the top of the boat?Many fiberglass boats are made in two giant parts, a top and bottom half. And then seamed together around the very edge under some sort of rubber trim. On those the top half is removed so as to allow easier access to the area of the transom so as not to have to work around the top layer of the boat. Sometimes a saw device might be used to remove a section of the top half to allow this access, but on many boats, if the transom is rotted, the damage will continue up under the flooring. So to strip out all the rotten wood, allowing new wood to be affixed to the plastic "shell" of a boat that's left, a lot of room is needed and removal of the top of boat can be best.What are the inner and outer "skins" on the transom?As mentioned before the transom may be two or more thick pieces of plywood glued together and covered with fiberglass, resin, and gelcoat, or paint. (actually the outer skin may have been formed in a mold where the mold is lined with gel coat then fiberglass and resin)What is my first step after removing the jet drive and engine?Poke around and find all the soft wood. I think in your case you need to search the web and find illustrated explanations of transom replacement. I've seen it a number of times but the exact sites I don't recall.Why don't they just make these wood pieces "bolt in?" to make replacement easier? Because by putting it all together with fiberglass and resin it becomes a light, stiff and strong monolithic structure.

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